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Would moving the inner function outside of this one so that its not created everytime the function is called be a micro-optimisation?

In this particular case the doMoreStuff function is only used inside doStuff. Should I worry about having local functions like these?

function doStuff() {
    var doMoreStuff = function(val) {
         // do some stuff
    }

    // do something
    for (var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
         doMoreStuff(list[i]);
         for (var  j = 0; j < list[i].children.length; j++) {
              doMoreStuff(list[i].children[j]);
         }
    }
    // do some other stuff

}

An actaul example would be say :

function sendDataToServer(data) {
    var callback = function(incoming) {
         // handle incoming
    }

    ajaxCall("url", data, callback);

} 
share|improve this question
    
probably. but there are other considerations as well - in this example, the closure you create by the function being inside is invaluable, it allows you to encapsulate all other local variables you have without having to pass them as parameters or reprocess something. –  davin Jan 20 '11 at 13:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not sure if this falls under the category "micro-optimization". I would say no.

But it depends on how often you call doStuff. If you call it often, then creating the function over and over again is just unnecessary and will definitely add overhead.

If you don't want to have the "helper function" in global scope but avoid recreating it, you can wrap it like so:

var doStuff = (function() {
    var doMoreStuff = function(val) {
         // do some stuff
    }
    return function() {
        // do something
        for (var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
            doMoreStuff(list[i]);
        }
        // do some other stuff 
    }
}());

As the function which is returned is a closure, it has access to doMoreStuff. Note that the outer function is immediately executed ( (function(){...}()) ).

Or you create an object that holds references to the functions:

var stuff = {
    doMoreStuff: function() {...},
    doStuff: function() {...}
};

More information about encapsulation, object creation patterns and other concepts can be found in the book JavaScript Patterns.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a very interesting concept. Using closures to make it act like it's static and private. –  Raynos Jan 20 '11 at 13:24
    
@Raynos: Yes, it is often used to encapsulate data, define private members of objects, etc. Depending on how familiar you are with JavaScript, I recommend the book JavaScript Patterns. –  Felix Kling Jan 20 '11 at 13:28
    
I'm familiar with the second one but "inlining" functions by using closures like that is something new to me. –  Raynos Jan 20 '11 at 13:58

It completely depends on how often the function is called. If it's a OnUpdate function that is called 10 times per second it is a decent optimalisation. If it's called three times per page, it is a micro optimalisation.

Though handy, nested function definitions are never needed (they can be replaced by extra arguments for the function).

Example with nested function:

function somefunc() {
    var localvar = 5

    var otherfunc = function() {
         alert(localvar);
    }

    otherfunc();
}

Same thing, now with argument instead:

function otherfunc(localvar) {
    alert(localvar);
}

function somefunc() {
    var localvar = 5

    otherfunc(localvar);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain how I can avoid nested functions. I mainly use them to keep the code DRY and because having them outside of that particular function just adds more to global namespace where it really aught to be local. Ideally I want a static function but that's not possible. –  Raynos Jan 20 '11 at 13:24
    
Sure, hang on :) –  orlp Jan 20 '11 at 13:25
    
The reason I want the local functions is mainly to contain otherfunc inside somefunc because it's only used there and inlining it gets a bit ugly. –  Raynos Jan 20 '11 at 13:57

It is absolutely a micro-optimization. The whole reason for having functions in the first place is so that you make your code cleaner, more maintainable and more readable. Functions add a semantic boundary to sections of code. Each function should only do one thing, and it should do it cleanly. So if you find your functions performing multiple things at the same time, you've got a candidate for refactoring it into multiple routines.

Only optimize when you've got something working that's too slow (If it's not working yet, it's too early to optimize. Period). Remember, nobody ever paid extra for a program that was faster than their needs/requirements...

Edit: Considering that the program isn't finished yet, it's also a premature optimization. Why is that bad? Well, first you're spending time working on something that may not matter in the long run. Second, you don't have a baseline to see if your optimizations improved anything in a realistic sense. Third, you're reducing maintainability and readability before you've even got it running, so it'll be harder to get running than if you went with clean concise code. Fourth, you don't know if you'll need doMoreStuff somewhere else in the program until you've finished it and understand all your needs (perhaps a longshot depending on the exact details, but not outside the realm of possibility).

There's a reason that Donnald Knuth said Premature optimization is the root of all evil...

share|improve this answer
    
*ever :) 15 char –  orlp Jan 20 '11 at 13:24
    
Thanks @nightcracker. fixed... –  ircmaxell Jan 20 '11 at 13:26

A quick "benchmark" run on an average PC (i know there are lots of unaccounted-for variables, so dont comment on the obvious, but it's interesting in any case):

count = 0;
t1 = +new Date();
while(count < 1000000) {
  p = function(){};
  ++count;
}
t2 = +new Date();
console.log(t2-t1); // milliseconds

It could be optimised by moving the increment to the condition for example (brings running time down by about 100 milliseconds, although it doesn't affect the difference between with and without function creation, so it isn't really relevant)

Running 3 times gave:

913
878
890

Then comment out the function creation line, 3 runs gave:

462
458
464

So purely on 1000,000 empty function creations you add about half a second. Even assuming your original code is running 10 times a second on a handheld device (let's say that devices overall performance is 1/100 of this laptop, which is exaggerated - it's probably closer to 1/10, although will provide a nice upper bound), that's equivalent to 1000 function creations/sec on this computer, which happens in 1/2000 of a second. So every second the handheld device is adding overhead of 1/2000 second of processing... half a millisecond every second isn't very much.

From this primitive test I would conclude that on a PC this is definitely a micro-optimisation, and if you're developing for weaker devices, it is almost certainly as well.

share|improve this answer
    
And if you compare it with a function body or loop body that does meaningful computation the difference lies in the boundary of statistical error on the dates. –  Raynos Jan 20 '11 at 13:56
    
@Raynos, i dont know how much benchmarking you've done, although testing with a larger loop body would defeat the purpose. if you keep the loop body minimal you can more accurately measure the effect of function creation, thereby_minimising_ the effect of date errors. that plus the fact that you run the test many times and you get an accurate measure. my point is that the loop body doesnt matter, your question is essentially, how much can i save by changing my code, and the answer lies in how much time creating the functions cost, which is best measured as i described. –  davin Jan 20 '11 at 14:03
    
What I was trying to say was that I thought it was a slightly meaningful optimisation. I doesn't really save much. I always thought it was bad practice. –  Raynos Jan 20 '11 at 14:32

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