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Let's say I have something like the following method in my container class:

Datatype& operator[](const unsigned int Index) // I know this should use size_t instead.
{
    return *(BasePointer + Index); // Where BasePointer is the start of the array.
}

I'd like to implement some sort of bounds-checking for the MyInstance[Index] = Value usage so the container resizes automatically if the user tries to change a value outside its range. However, I want something else to happen if the user tries to access a value outside the container's range, e.g. MyVariable = MyInstance[Index]. How can I detect how operator[] is being used?

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1  
You mean (for example) throw an exception for going out of bounds? –  Zac Howland Jan 20 '11 at 13:33
2  
Maxpm: You can't. operator[] doesn't know what's being done with its result. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 13:37
2  
@Tomalak: That's most certainly wrong. –  sbi Jan 20 '11 at 13:43
3  
@sbi: Care to provide a longer explanation? I agree (in what I understood from @Tomalak's comment): When the compiler sees the call to the operator[] and resolves the call, it does not consider what the operator is being used for, only the types of the argument. Nor does it pass information into the operator[] about the context of the call. How is "operator[] doesn't know what's being done with its result" most certainly wrong? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 20 '11 at 13:47
2  
@sbi: It's a fact that the function operator[] does not know what's being done with its result. "That's most certainly wrong" is a bizarre thing to say to it. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 13:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Sketch:

return a proxy object instead of the actual data entry. The proxy object then defines operator = to handle the assignment case, and an implicit conversion operator for the reading-out case.

template <typename T>
class AccessorProxy {
  friend class Container<T>;
public:
    AccessorProxy(Container<T>& data, unsigned index)
        : data(data), index(index) { }
    void operator =(T const& new_value) {
        // Expand array.
    }
    operator const T&() const {
        // Do bounds check.
        return *(data.inner_array + index);
    }
private:
    AccessorProxy(const AccessorProxy& rhs)
     : data(rhs.data), index(rhs.index) {}
    AccessorProxy& operator=(const AccessorProxy&);
    Container<T>& data;
    unsigned index;
};

template <typename T>
class ConstAccessorProxy {
  friend class Container<T>;
public:
    ConstAccessorProxy(const Container<T>& data, unsigned index)
        : data(data), index(index) { }
    operator const T&() const {
        // Do bounds check.
        return *(data.inner_array + index);
    }
private:
    ConstAccessorProxy(const ConstAccessorProxy& rhs)
     : data(rhs.data), index(rhs.index) {}
    ConstAccessorProxy& operator=(const ConstAccessorProxy&);
    const Container<T>& data;
    unsigned index;
};

AccessorProxy<Datatype> operator[](const unsigned int Index)
{
    return AccessorProxy<Datatype>(*this, Index);
}
ConstAccessorProxy<Datatype> operator[] const (const unsigned int Index)
{
    return ConstAccessorProxy<Datatype>(*this, Index);
}

The accessor classes will likely need to be be friends of the container class.

Finding ways to avoid the code duplication is left as an exercise to the reader. :)

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Damn, I was still writing mine! :) –  sbi Jan 20 '11 at 13:46
    
You might want to make this operator const T&(), no? And this one cannot be instantiated with a const container. –  sbi Jan 20 '11 at 13:47
    
+1 I forgot about this. deleting mine. point of reference: std::auto_ptr does something similar. –  John Dibling Jan 20 '11 at 13:48
    
@sbi: Correct on both counts. This is why I wrote “sketch”. I’m actually somewhat very busy right now and have no business writing Stack Overflow answers (oh yes, but answer sketches are completely fine :D). Feel free to write a production-ready code ;-) … I’ll most definitely upvote it. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 20 '11 at 13:49
1  
On AccessorProxy copy constructor: That's why I used a private nested class with public copy constructor. This protects incorrect usage of the proxy type from Murphy, though not from Machiavelli. (There's template argument deduction, and in C++0x auto and decltype.) Also, the copy assignment operator for the proxy should be public and should assign one element of the container, to support c[i] = c[j]. –  aschepler Jan 20 '11 at 16:37

This is not a perfect answer to "how to detect", but, if the user is accessing the operator[] via a const instance, then throw an exception if the index is out of bounds. i.e.

Datatype const& operator[]() const { .. // don't modify here, throw exception

However, if the user is accessing the instance via a non const instance, then by all means expand if the index is out of bounds (and within your acceptable ranges)

Datatype& operator[]() { .. // modify here

Basically, you are using the const attribute of the instance to determine what your semantics would be (as done in std::map - i.e. trying to call operator[] on a const instance of a map results in a compiler error - i.e. there is no const qualified operator[] for map, because the function is guaranteed to create a mapping if the key does not exist already.)

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This won’t work. const isn’t enough to disambiguate between rvalue and lvalue usage. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 20 '11 at 13:42
1  
-1 This is wrong, the decision on which overload is used depends only on the type of the variable that the operator is applied to, not on what is done with the result. MyInstance[0] will call the non-const overload if MyInstance is not constant (or a non-const reference), and it will call the const version if MyInstance is a constant object or a constant reference; regardless of whether the operation appears at the left or right hand side of an assignment. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 20 '11 at 13:42
1  
@David/@Konrad, I understand that, the point I'm not getting then is, why on earth would you want to expand the array if MyInstance is const, and if MyInstance that is being used is non const, then why isn't it fair game to expand on access? So surely the fact that the user is using either a const/non-const version is guarantee enough as to whether the container should be expanded or not? rather than whether it's rvalue or lvalue? –  Nim Jan 20 '11 at 14:02
1  
@Nim: the rationale you offer is acceptable but the OP wants to have different semantics and his choice can also be justified (like this: reading access shouldn’t modify the object, even if it’s not const). –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 20 '11 at 14:16
    
@Konrad, fair enough, I'll change my answer to reflect my thinking... –  Nim Jan 20 '11 at 14:32

Use a dummy class type to represent expressions like MyInstance[Index] and delay figuring out what to do until that expression is used.

class MyContainer {
private:
    class IndexExpr {
    public:
        // Get data from container:
        operator const Datatype&() const;
        // Expand container if necessary, then store data:
        Datatype& operator=(const Datatype& value);

        // Treat MyInstance[i] = MyInstance[j]; as expected:
        Datatype& operator=(const IndexExpr& rhs)
        { return *this = static_cast<const Datatype&>(rhs); }
    private:
        IndexExpr(MyContainer& cont, unsigned int ind);
        MyContainer& container_;
        unsigned int index_;
        friend class MyContainer;
    };

public:
    IndexExpr operator[](unsigned int Index)
    { return IndexExpr(*this, Index); }

    // No IndexExpr needed when container is const:
    const Datatype& operator[](unsigned int Index) const;

    // ...
};
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Could you please explain why operator const Datatype&() const works? –  Maxpm Jan 20 '11 at 16:26
1  
@Maxpm: What about it? It is an implicit conversion operator. When an expression of type MyContainer::IndexExpr, such as MyInstance[Index] is used in a context where a const Datatype& would make sense, C++ will automatically call that conversion function. –  aschepler Jan 20 '11 at 16:49

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