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Is there any situation where it makes sense for a class to implement its equals() and hashCode() methods using a different set of the class fields?

I'm asking because I am puzzled by the Netbeans equals() and hashCode() generator, where you are asked to choose the fields to include in each method separately. I always end up selecting the same fields for both methods, but is there a situation where this is not the correct choice?

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1  
With the implication that the Netbeans code generator is wrong to give the choice if there is never a good reason to choose diferent fields. –  Raedwald Jan 20 '11 at 14:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Well, equals() must use all the fields used by hashCode(), as otherwise you could get different hash codes for equal objects. The reverse isn't true though - you could choose not to take account of one particular field when choosing the hash code. That way you could end up with the same hash code for two unequal objects which only differed by that "unused" field (as opposed to through natural collisions). You'd only want that in a situation where you knew collisions would be unlikely but where you were going to be hashing a lot. I imagine it's extremely rare :)

Another case would be where you had some sort of custom equality comparison - such as case insensitive string comparisons - where it's tricky or expensive to generate a hash code for the field. Again, this would lead to more likelihood of collision but would be valid.

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"you could choose not to take account of [some fields]", for example, if those fields merely hold a cached value computed from other fields. –  Raedwald Jan 20 '11 at 14:25
    
@Raedwald: But why would you include those fields for equality in that case? Maybe I've misunderstood your suggestion... but you're right that precomputed fields could be relevant. –  Jon Skeet Jan 20 '11 at 14:26
    
You would exclude fields that held cached values. –  Raedwald Jan 20 '11 at 14:27
    
@Raedwald: From the hash, or from equality? –  Jon Skeet Jan 20 '11 at 14:29
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I've done this in cases where collections contribute to equality. –  sfussenegger Jan 20 '11 at 14:31

Jon Skeet did a good job answering this question (as he always does). However, I'd like to add that this is a valid implementation for any implementation of equals

public int hashCode() {
  return 42;
}

Naturally, performance of hashed data structures will degrade dramatically. Nevertheless, it's better to kill performance than breaking them. So if you ever decide to override equals but don't see any need to provide a sane hashCode implementation, that's the lazy man's way to go.

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I don't think there is. I blogged about this topic previously - I think it's a UI flaw in NetBeans that they let you pick them independently of each other. From my blog post:

This post from bytes.com does a good job of explaining this:

Overriding the hashCode method.

The contract for the equals method should really have another line saying you must proceed to override the hashCode method after overriding the equals method. The hashCode method is supported for the benefit of hash based collections.

The contract

Again from the specs:

Whenever it is invoked on the same object more than once during an execution of an application, the hashCode method must consistently return the same integer, provided no information used in equals comparisons on the object is modified. This integer need not remain consistent from one execution of an application to another execution of the same application. If two objects are equal according to the equals(Object) method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce the same integer result. It is not required that if two objects are unequal according to the equals method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce distinct integer results. However, the programmer should be aware that producing distinct integer results for unequal objects may improve the performance of hash tables. So equal objects must have equal hashCodes. An easy way to ensure that this condition is always satisfied is to use the same attributes used in determining equality in determining the hashCode. You should now see why it is important to override hashCode every time you override equals.

That sentence from the last paragraph sums it up: “An easy way to ensure that this condition is always satisfied is to use the same attributes used in determining equality in determining the hashCode”.

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Generally, you should use the same fields. From the equals() documentation:

Note that it is generally necessary to override the hashCode method whenever this method is overridden, so as to maintain the general contract for the hashCode method, which states that equal objects must have equal hash codes.

From the hashCode() documentation:

If two objects are equal according to the equals(Object) method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce the same integer result.

Note that the reverse is not true - you can have two objects with the same hashcode which are not equal (This is how some data structures resolve collisions)

So theoretically it is possible to use a subset of the equals(..) method fields for the hashCode() method, but I can't think if a practical reason to do so.

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1  
This is wrong. Two objects with equal hash code needn't be equal, so it's sufficient to use a subset of fields used for equals to compute a hash code. See Jon Skeet's answer. –  sfussenegger Jan 20 '11 at 14:28
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@sfussenegger thanks, corrected my statement. –  Bozho Jan 20 '11 at 14:44
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the only practical reasons I can think of are laziness - c'mon, it's a lotta typing ;) - and performance, e.g. if a collection contributes to equality. Additionally, there could be one or two fields that are close to being unique. btw, the downvote wasn't mine though ;) –  sfussenegger Jan 20 '11 at 14:53

As a follow up to Jon Skeet's answer I recently ran into a case where I needed to implement the hashCode method with only a subset of the fields used in the equals method. The (simplified) scenario is this:

I have two classes A and B that each contain a reference to the other in addition to having a String key defined. Using the automatic hashCode and equals generator in Eclipse (which, unlike Netbeans, only gives the option to use the same fields in both methods) I end up with the following classes:

public class A {

    public B b;
    public String bKey;

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + ((b == null) ? 0 : b.hashCode());
        result = prime * result + ((bKey == null) ? 0 : bKey.hashCode());
        return result;
    }
    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (!(obj instanceof A))
            return false;
        A other = (A) obj;
        if (b == null) {
            if (other.b != null)
                return false;
        } else if (!b.equals(other.b))
            return false;
        if (bKey == null) {
            if (other.bKey != null)
                return false;
        } else if (!bKey.equals(other.bKey))
            return false;
        return true;
    }
}

public class B {

    public A a;
    public String aKey;

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + ((a == null) ? 0 : a.hashCode());
        result = prime * result + ((aKey == null) ? 0 : aKey.hashCode());
        return result;
    }
    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (!(obj instanceof B))
            return false;
        B other = (B) obj;
        if (a == null) {
            if (other.a != null)
                return false;
        } else if (!a.equals(other.a))
            return false;
        if (aKey == null) {
            if (other.aKey != null)
                return false;
        } else if (!aKey.equals(other.aKey))
            return false;
        return true;
    }
}

The problem came about when I tried to add class A to a HashSet in the following way:

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        A a = new A();
        B b = new B();
        a.b = b;
        b.a = a;

        Set<A> aSet = new HashSet<A>();
        aSet.add(a);
    }

This will end in a StackOverflowError since adding a to aSet will result in a's hashCode method being called, which will result in b's hashCode being called, which will result in a's hashCode being called, etc, etc, etc. The only way to get around this is to either remove the reference to A from B's hashCode and equals OR only include the String bKey in B's hashCode method. Since I wanted the B.equals method to include the reference A in checking for equality the only thing I could do was to make B.hashCode use only a subset of the fields that were used in B.equals i.e. only use the B.bKey in B.hashCode. I could see no other way around this.

Possibly my design is flawed and I welcome someone to point that out but this is essentially the way my domain objects are structured in my actual program.

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Read Effective Java at chapter 3: "Always override hashCode when you override equals".

And I think if your object will never be put into hash-based collection, you don't have to override hashCode.

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