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How can I expose a List<T> so that it is readonly but can be set privately?

This doesnt work:

public List<string> myList {readonly get; private set; }

Even if you do:

public List<string> myList {get; private set; }

You can still do this:

myList.Add("TEST"); //This should not be allowed

I guess you could have:

public List<string> myList {get{ return otherList;}}
private List<string> otherList {get;set;}
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15 Answers 15

up vote 63 down vote accepted

I think you are mixing concepts.

public List<string> myList {get; private set;}

is already "read-only". That is, outside this class, nothing can set myList to a different instance of List<string>

However, if you want a readonly list as in "I don't want people to be able to modify the list contents", then you need to expose a ReadOnlyCollection<string>. You can do this via:

private List<string> actualList = new List<string>();
public ReadOnlyCollection<string> myList
{
  get{ return actualList.AsReadOnly();}
}

Note that in the first code snippet, others can manipulate the List, but can not change what list you have. In the second snippet, others will get a read-only list that they can not modify.

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2  
great point. A lot of people miss the concept of reference types and setting the reference to readonly. +1 –  DustinDavis Jan 20 '11 at 16:01
3  
Even better would be to the ReadOnlyCollection as IList<string>. –  Joe Jan 20 '11 at 16:12
    
+1. Returning a public System.Collections.ObjectModel.ReadOnlyCollection is better than using a "private set" on a public-property because it gives you compile-time-checking. Meaning it will throw compile errors when using Add() or RemoveAt() on your read-only collection, whereas the "private set" will not. –  MikeTeeVee Aug 29 '12 at 15:57
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If you want readonly collection use ReadOnlyCollection<T>, not List<T>:

public ReadOnlyCollection<string> MyList { get; private set; }
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Return a ReadOnlyCollection, which implements IList<>

private List<string> myList;

public IList<string> MyList
{
  get{return myList.AsReadOnly();}
}
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I prefer to use IEnumerable

private readonly List<string> _list = new List<string>();

public IEnumerable<string> Values // Adding is not allowed - only iteration
{
   get { return _list; }
}
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8  
This is a good approach except that it's flawed: MyClass m = new MyClass(); List<string> x = m.Values as List<string>; x.Add("test"); foreach (string s in m.Values) { Console.WriteLine(s); } //This allows me to add values to it just by casting. –  DustinDavis Jan 20 '11 at 15:43
4  
Well, thats a hack :) You can also use reflection to add elements to inner collection. IEnumerable hides implementation from MyClass clients. Will you be sure that I'm not using LinkedList inside? –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 20 '11 at 15:52
3  
You can always reflect to find the collection type so i'll always be sure. If you're going to do it, do it right. Sure anyone can use reflection to "hack" the object to add items but there isn't much you can do about that. Practicing proper techniques and using the framework propertly is all you can do. –  DustinDavis Jan 20 '11 at 15:55
6  
1) Trying to cast interface to some class - is incorrect usage of interface and you should kick one who do this 2) What's wrong with yield statement? –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 20 '11 at 16:21
3  
It is a hack to cast from ICollection<T> to List<T> if the API provides an ICollection<T>. –  tster Jan 20 '11 at 18:34
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There's a collection called ReadOnlyCollection<T> - is that what you're looking for?

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You can use List's AsReadOnly() method to return a read-only wrapper.

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private List<string> my_list;

public ReadOnlyCollection<string> myList
{
    get { return my_list.AsReadOnly(); }
    private set { my_list = value; }
}
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    private List<string> _items = new List<string>();         

    public ReadOnlyCollection<string> Items

    {

        get { return _items.AsReadOnly(); }

        private set { _items = value }

    }
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Here is one way

public class MyClass
    {
        private List<string> _myList;
        public ReadOnlyCollection<string> PublicReadOnlyList { get { return _myList.AsReadOnly(); } }

        public MyClass()
        {
            _myList = new List<string>();
            _myList.Add("tesT");
            _myList.Add("tesT1");
            _myList.Add("tesT2");

            //(_myList.AsReadOnly() as List<string>).Add("test 5");
        }

    }
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1  
Mmm... I think you can just use PublicReadOnlyList with getter new ReadOnlyCollection<string>(_myList) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 20 '11 at 15:56
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private List<string> myList;

public string this[int i]
{
    get { return myList[i]; }
    set { myList[i] = value; }
}
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Why are you using a List. Sounds like what you really want to expose is IEnumerable

public IEnumerable<string> myList { get; private set; }

Now users of the class can read the items but not chagnge the list.

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1  
flawed! you can cast it as List<> and add values: MyClass m = new MyClass(); List<string> x = m.Values as List<string>; x.Add("test"); foreach (string s in m.Values) { Console.WriteLine(s); } –  DustinDavis Jan 20 '11 at 15:47
3  
Yes, you CAN do a lot of things. Of course you could always set myList to something other than a List<T> in which case that code would break. I usually don't worry about problems caused by people purposefully ignoring encapsulation. –  tster Jan 20 '11 at 15:56
1  
you shouldn't have to worry about people "ignoring encapsulation". Encapsulation is encapsulation and being able to cast one type to another has nothing to do with encapsulation. If you're going to do it, do it right. –  DustinDavis Jan 20 '11 at 16:00
3  
@DustinDavis, casting an exposed type to another type that you know the implementation actually used is the definition of breaking encapsulation. –  tster Jan 20 '11 at 16:01
2  
@DustinDavis, Consumers certainly can break encapsulation. Them ignoring what your API provides won't hurt you in any way. It's like if I sell you a car with a warranty and you go and replace the tires with huge doughnuts. You can do it, but I won't guarantee the results. –  tster Jan 20 '11 at 16:42
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You could also create your normal list, but expose it through a property of type IEnumerable

private List<int> _list = new List<int>();

public IEnumerable<int> publicCollection{
   get { return _list; }
}
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flawed! you can cast it as List<> and add values: MyClass m = new MyClass(); List<string> x = m.Values as List<string>; x.Add("test"); foreach (string s in m.Values) { Console.WriteLine(s); } –  DustinDavis Jan 20 '11 at 15:48
1  
Indeed - even _list.AsEnumerable() would be castable to List, to my surprise. –  Adam Rackis Jan 20 '11 at 19:39
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A bit late, but nevertheless: I don't like using the ReadOnlyCollection wrapper because it still exposes all the methods for modifying the collection, which all throw a NotSupportedException when accessed in run-time. In other words, it implements the IList interface, but then violates this same contract in run-time.

To express that I am really exposing an immutable list, I usually resort to a custom IIndexable interface, which adds Length and an indexer to an IEnumerable (described in this CodeProject article). It is a wrapper as it should have been done in the first place IMHO.

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I didn't see this option mentioned yet:

private List<string> myList;

public List<string> MyList
{
    get { return myList.AsReadOnly().ToList(); }
}

This should allow you to expose a read-only List.

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In the .NET 4.5 framework you can expose only the IReadOnlyList interface. Something like:

private List<string> _mylist;
public IReadOnlyList<string> myList { get {return _myList;} }

or if you want to prevent unwanted casting to IList

private List<string> _mylist;
public IReadOnlyList<string> myList { get {return new List<string>(_myList);} }
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