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I have a file that contains directory names:

my_list.txt :

/tmp
/var/tmp

I'd like to check in Bash before I'll add a directory name if that name already exists in the file.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 208 down vote accepted
grep -Fxq "$FILENAME" my_list.txt

The exit status is 0 (true) if the name was found, 1 (false) if not, so:

if grep -Fxq "$FILENAME" my_list.txt
then
    # code if found
else
    # code if not found
fi

Here are the relevant sections of the man page for grep:

grep [options] PATTERN [FILE...]

-F, --fixed-strings
       Interpret PATTERN as a list of fixed strings, separated by  new-
       lines, any of which is to be matched.

-x, --line-regexp
       Select only those matches that exactly match the whole line.

-q, --quiet, --silent
       Quiet; do not write anything to standard output.  Exit  immedi-
       ately  with  zero status if any match is found, even if an error
       was detected.  Also see the -s or --no-messages option.
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If I execute this command from bash script how to catch 0 or 1 into a variable ? –  Toren Jan 20 '11 at 16:06
1  
@Toren Most recent exit status can be accessed using $?. you can also use the grep command alongside the if statement (as shown in updated answer). –  Shawn Chin Jan 20 '11 at 16:08
    
Updated with something that is hopefully closer to the mark. –  Thomas Jan 20 '11 at 16:08
3  
You can use grep -Fqx "$FILENAME" and you don't have to worry about regex characters in the variable contents and you won't have to use them in the search string. –  Dennis Williamson Jan 20 '11 at 16:49
    
Ah, good one! Didn't know about -x (and -F by itself was obviously not enough). Edited. –  Thomas Jan 20 '11 at 16:51

Regarding the following solution:

grep -Fxq "$FILENAME" my_list.txt

In case you are wondering (as I did) what -Fxq means in plain English F affects how PATTERN is interpreted (fixed string instead of a regex), x match whole line, q shhhhh... minimal printing

From the man file:

-F, --fixed-strings

          Interpret  PATTERN  as  a  list of fixed strings, separated by newlines, any of which is to be matched.
          (-F is specified by POSIX.)
-x, --line-regexp
          Select only those matches that exactly match the whole line.  (-x is specified by POSIX.)
-q, --quiet, --silent
          Quiet; do not write anything to standard output.  Exit immediately with zero status  if  any  match  is
          found,  even  if  an error was detected.  Also see the -s or --no-messages option.  (-q is specified by
          POSIX.)
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2  
-F does not affect the file processing, it affects how PATTERN is interpreted. Typically, PATTERN is interpreted as a regex, but with -F it will be interpreted as a fixed string. –  Adam S Mar 12 '13 at 19:57
    
Thanks for your comment, error corrected. –  Kuf Mar 12 '13 at 21:06

Three methods in my mind:

1) Short test for a name in a path (I'm not sure this might be your case)

ls -a "path" | grep "name"


2) Short test for a string in a file

grep -R "string" "filepath"


3) Longer bash script using regex:

#!/bin/bash

declare file="content.txt"
declare regex="\s+string\s+"

declare file_content=$( cat "${file}" )
if [[ " $file_content " =~ $regex ]] # please note the space before and after the file content
    then
        echo "found"
    else
        echo "not found"
fi

exit

This should be quicker if you have to test multiple string on a file content using a loop for example changing the regex at any cicle.

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Why are the spaces necessary before and after the $file_contenet? –  EminezArtus Feb 3 at 21:38

Simpler way:

if grep "$filename" my_list.txt > /dev/null
then
   ... found
else
   ... not found
fi

Tip: send to /dev/null if you want command's exit status, but not outputs.

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If I understood your question correctly, this should do what you need.

  1. you can specifiy the directory you would like to add through $check variable
  2. if the directory is already in the list, the output is "dir already listed"
  3. if the directory is not yet in the list, it is appended to my_list.txt

In one line: check="/tmp/newdirectory"; [[ -n $(grep "^$check\$" my_list.txt) ]] && echo "dir already listed" || echo "$check" >> my_list.txt

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You don't need to test the output of grep, you can just use grep -q and call grep directly from if as Thomas does in his answer. In addition, the question didn't include checking whether the directory exists before adding it to the list (it could be a list of deleted directories, after all). –  Sorpigal Jan 20 '11 at 17:26
    
I removed the example script, it didn't add anything to the answer given by Thomas. –  lecodesportif Jan 25 '11 at 13:38
if grep -q "$Filename$" my_list.txt
   then
     echo "exist"
else 
     echo "not exist"
fi
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