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I created an inherited attribute like this in ASP.NET MVC3:

public sealed class RequiredFromResourceAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{
    public RequiredFromResourceAttribute(string errorResourceName, string errorResourceTypeName)
    {
        this.ErrorMessageResourceName = errorResourceName;
        this.ErrorMessageResourceType = Type.GetType(errorResourceTypeName);
    }
}

And use it like this:

[RequiredFromResource("Title", "Resources.Resource, MyProject.Mvc, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null")]
public string Title { get; set; }

It didn't work and the MVC ignored it. Then I create a simpler class which just inherited from RequiredAttribute like this:

public class MyRequiredAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{
}

I use it like that I said. But it didn't work again.

Although, all these ways work on "DisplayNameAtrribute" perfectly.

What is the problem?

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In my opinion, marcind's answer handles this better than SkipHarris'. The RequiredAttributeAdapter in Skip's seems to cause the client side validation to use the regular Required attribute instead of the RequiredFromResourceAttribute. –  Keerigan Jan 3 '13 at 22:04
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can fix this by adding the following code in Global.asax: (found the answer here)

DataAnnotationsModelValidatorProvider.RegisterAdapter(typeof(RequiredLocalizableAttribute), typeof(RequiredAttributeAdapter));

Alternatively, using marcind's solution, I found that the constructor for ModelClientValidationRequiredRule requires an error message. Here is an updated version that includes the display name for the field:

    public IEnumerable<ModelClientValidationRule> GetClientValidationRules(ModelMetadata metadata, ControllerContext context)
    {
        string msg = FormatErrorMessage(metadata.GetDisplayName());
        yield return new ModelClientValidationRequiredRule(msg);
    }
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@marcind's answer seems to handle this much better. Using the RequiredAttributeAdapter seems to call the regular Required attribute instead of the custom one. –  Keerigan Jan 3 '13 at 22:02
    
Skip's answer seems to work just fine for me. Thanks Skip. –  Steven Rogers Mar 22 '13 at 15:46
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It's only client-side validation that does not work with inherited attributes. The reason for that is that MVC uses strict type equality when mapping server-side attributes to client validation behaviors.

To work around this you will need your custom attribute to implement IClientValidatable:

public class MyRequiredAttribute : IClientValidatable {
    public IEnumerable<ModelClientValidationRule> GetClientValidationRules(ModelMetadata metadata, ControllerContext context) {
         yield return new ModelClientValidationRequiredRule();
    }
}
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1  
So, why the same way works on MVC2 !? –  A. Karimi Jan 22 '11 at 7:54
1  
This is a much better way to handle this than @SkipHarris'. Using the RequiredAttributeAdapter seems to call the regular Required attribute instead of the custom one. –  Keerigan Jan 3 '13 at 22:01
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