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Consider this minimal example:

template <typename T, typename U>
struct foo {};

template <template <typename...> class Bar>
struct converter
{
     template <typename... Args>
     converter(const Bar<Args...> &);
};

int main()
{
    converter<foo> c(foo<int,double>()); // This works.
    // converter<foo> c = foo<int,double>(); This fails
}

The commented-out line fails with both GCC 4.5 and 4.6, with a message like:

main.cpp:10:2: error: wrong number of template arguments (1, should be 2)
main.cpp:4:8: error: provided for template<class T, class U> struct foo
main.cpp: In function int main():
main.cpp:15:37: error: conversion from foo<int, double> to non-scalar type converter<foo> requested

If, instead of using variadic templates, the specific number of template parameters is used (i.e., 2 in this case) there are no errors. I'm a bit confused since I expected the two lines to be exactly equivalent: is this an expected behaviour?

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Would converter<foo> c = converter<foo>(foo<int,double>()); work? –  Tomek Jan 20 '11 at 16:58
    
Nope, as pointed out by Johannes below it was my mistake in implying that the first line of the main() actually initializes anything. Your suggestion produces the same error as the commented line. –  bluescarni Jan 20 '11 at 18:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, this is supposed to work. It's a GCC error. GCC doesn't support C++0x variadic templates to the fullest yet (and to be fair, the specification is still constantly changing in details).

What you say "This works" is really declaring a function; it doesn't initialize an object, which was what you intended.

For what you intended, see 14.3.3p3 which describes how template<typename...> class Bar can match foo, and 14.8.2.5p9 which describes how foo<Args...> can match foo<int, double>.

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Doh, my bad.. Of course you are right about not actually initialising anything. Thanks for the pointers :) –  bluescarni Jan 20 '11 at 17:49
template <typename T, typename U>
struct foo {};


struct converter
{
 template <template <typename...> class Bar, class ...Args>
     converter(const Bar<Args...> &){}
};

int main()
{
    converter c1((foo<int,double>())); // This works.
    converter c2 = foo<int,double>();// This works
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works around the problem indeed... Unfortunately it does not translate readily to the real-world usage I had in mind for the class :( –  bluescarni Apr 4 '11 at 17:33

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