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i would like to have a query that will solve my problem in native sql.

i have a table named "synonym" which holds words and the words' synonyms.

id, word, synonym
1, abandon, forsaken
2, abandon, desolate
...

As you can see words are repeated in this table lots of times and this makes the table unnecessarily big. i would like to have a table named "words" which doesn't have duplicate words like:

id, word, synonyms
1, abandon, 234|90
...

note: "234" and "90" here are the id's of forsaken and desolate in newly created words table.

so i already created a new "words" table with unique words from word field at synonym table. what i need is an sql query that will look at the synonym table for each word's synonyms then find their id's from words table and update the "synonyms" field with vertical line seperated ids. then i will just drop the synonym table.

just like:

UPDATE words SET synonyms= ( vertical line seperated id's (id's from words table) of the words at the synonyms at synonym table )

i know i must use group_concat but i couldn't achieved this.

hope this is clear enough. thanks for the help!

share|improve this question
    
Just a note - it may be somewhat difficult to identify if 2 words are synonyms with the structure you're proposing. –  Sam Dufel Jan 20 '11 at 17:46
    
i thought about the difficulties but with this structure i will use explode to get the id's and the implode them within a query like "or id='1' or id='2'..." to get each synonym. it is better for me. –  Conrad Warhol Jan 20 '11 at 18:23
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can avoid using update and do it using the queries below:

TRUNCATE TABLE words;

INSERT INTO words
SELECT (@rowNum := @rowNum+1), 
                a.word, 
                SUBSTRING(REPLACE(a.syns, a.id + '|', ''), 2) syns
FROM (
            SELECT a.*,group_concat(id SEPARATOR '|') syns
            FROM synonyms a
            GROUP BY word
         ) a,  
         (SELECT @rowNum := 0) b

Test Script:

CREATE TABLE `ts_synonyms` (
    `id` INT(11) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
    `word` VARCHAR(20) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
    `synonym` VARCHAR(2000) NULL DEFAULT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE `ts_words` (
    `id` INT(11) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
    `word` VARCHAR(20) NULL DEFAULT NULL,
    `synonym` VARCHAR(2000) NULL DEFAULT NULL
);

INSERT INTO ts_synonyms
VALUES ('1','abandon','forsaken'),
('2','abandon','desolate'),
('3','test','tester'),
('4','test','tester4'),
('5','ChadName','Chad'),
('6','Charles','Chuck'),
('8','abandon','something');


INSERT INTO ts_words
SELECT (@rowNum := @rowNum+1), 
                a.word, 
                SUBSTRING(REPLACE(a.syns, a.id + '|', ''), 2) syns
    FROM (
                    SELECT a.*, 
                                    GROUP_CONCAT(id SEPARATOR '|') syns
                        FROM ts_synonyms a
                        GROUP BY word
              ) a, 
                (SELECT @rowNum := 0) b;
SELECT * FROM ts_synonyms;              
SELECT * FROM ts_words;             
share|improve this answer
    
sorry this is a bit hard for me to understand. so if possible can you replace the field and table names with the ones i wrote at the question? thanks. –  Conrad Warhol Jan 20 '11 at 18:27
    
Updated the query. Try noe.. Make sure you take backup of the tables –  Chandu Jan 20 '11 at 18:32
    
thanks! will try now.. –  Conrad Warhol Jan 20 '11 at 18:41
    
this gave an error and left me with an empty words table. (db was backed up so no problem) –  Conrad Warhol Jan 20 '11 at 21:48
    
Added the script I tried and it works fine. I have changed the table names so that you can run it and see the results. –  Chandu Jan 20 '11 at 22:09
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Your proposed schema is plain horrible.

Why not use a many-to-many relationship ?

Table words

id     word
1      abandon
234    forsaken

Table synonyms

wid    sid
1      234
1      90
share|improve this answer
    
yeah i know the schema is horrible. but i really want to know how i can sort this out in one table. even if i decide to go with a two table solution, i would even want to learn how to do something like this. thanks a lot for your oppinion. –  Conrad Warhol Jan 20 '11 at 19:01
1  
the many-to-many is the ONLY way to go. You won't have to store data twice and you will have the relation between words both ways. Very fast way to find your data any way you want. –  patrick Feb 17 at 10:21
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