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Please consider the following code:

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function a(){
    var v = 9;
    var w = 2;
    var x = 7;
    var template = '{w} + {x} = {v}';
    var func = eval('(' + c.toString() + ')');
    func(template);
}

function b(){
    var v = 1;
    var y = 'hello';
    var z = 'world';
    var template = '{v}. {y} {z}';
    var func = eval('(' + c.toString() + ')');
    func(template);
}

function c(template){
    var re = /{(.+?)}/;
    var match = template.match(re);
    while (match != null){
        template = template.replace(re, eval(match[1]));
        match = template.match(re);
    }
    alert(template);
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<input type="button" value="a" onclick="a()"/><br/>
<input type="button" value="b" onclick="b()"/><br/>
</body>
</html>

This code has two functions (a and b) and a parsing function c that receives a string template as parameter and parses it, using variables that are scoped in the calling function (a or b).

This means that function c has to 'know' all the variables that are known to whichever function was calling it.

What I want is for c to 'know' all the variables in the scope of its caller.

My solution was this line of code in a and b:

var func = eval('(' + c.toString() + ')');

What this does is redefine c as func inside the calling function, so in effect making it a sub function of the caller and thus bringing it into the same scope.

This solution works great, but the problem with it is that it's ugly. I have to turn c into a string and re-eval it to a function every time I want to use it. I'm hoping someone can suggest a better solution, if such exists.

I don't want to pass all the variables as parameters to c because:

  1. The template to parse can be very big and include anywhere from1 to dozens of variables.
  2. If I pass all the variables as parameters to c and access them using the arguments array in c it means I have to use array notation inside the template which is bad practice for obvious reasons.
  3. Putting all the variables into a hash map object and passing that object as parameter to c is possible, but makes for a huge coding overhead to create this hash map from the caller's variables before any call to c.

Note: Please don't bother pointing out to me that the parsing function is not perfect, it's just a simplified example of my actual code.

share|improve this question
    
The simple answer is that there must be a better way. –  Pointy Jan 20 '11 at 17:59
2  
This code looks so wrong... –  delnan Jan 20 '11 at 17:59
    
Hmm... so you want to associate a particular set of data with a set of functions to operate on it? That sounds suspiciously like object oriented code. –  Sam Dufel Jan 20 '11 at 18:00
1  
Oh, and no, there is no way to "bring all scoped variables of one function into another." –  Pointy Jan 20 '11 at 18:02
    
...The code uses private variables, but are they needed? Your point 3 suggests that the values are passed in by the caller. Will all the values be passed in? If so, it could be as simple as passing on the Arguments object. –  user113716 Jan 20 '11 at 18:26

6 Answers 6

You're overcomplicating things. You can eliminate the need to cross scopes by packing your replacement values as an object rather than as individual variables, and using the g flag and a replacement function allow you to greatly simplify c(). Give this a try:

function a(){
    var values = {
        v: 9,
        w: 2,
        x: 7
    };

    func(c('{w} + {x} = {v}', values));
}

function b(){
    var values = {
        v: 1,
        y: 'hello',
        z: 'world'
    };

    func(c('{v}. {y} {z}', values));
}

function c(template, values) {
    return template.replace(/{(.*?)}/g, function(match) {
        return values[match[1]];
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
From OP's Point 3, it seems he doesn't want to do this because the values will be passed in and an object will need to be constructed each time. Good solution otherwise. –  user113716 Jan 20 '11 at 19:14
    
rather values should be new function (global object) and reassign v,y,z. Thumbs up for this solution. –  hungryMind Jan 20 '11 at 19:19
    
Ben, thanks for the answer, but like patrick pointed out, I need a solution that doesn't involve packing all the variables into an object. I have big templates that will parse variables from different objects and assorted places in my app. It will simply be impractical to pack them all into an object for every template. –  Orr Siloni Jan 20 '11 at 20:42
    
@Orr — Ultimately, I suspect you'll have to choose between eval() and some form of variable packing. Javascript, sadly, simply doesn't allow you to access the local scope directly (a la Python's locals() or Lua's getfenv()). –  Ben Blank Jan 20 '11 at 21:58

After playing with it for a while, this is the closest I've been able to come to passing the local scope into another function. It's seriously hacky, involves a fair bit of code duplication, and still needs eval() (though not as much), but it may be what you're looking for.

Basically, this involves declaring all of your local variables as function parameters (instead of using var statements) so that their names can be extracted by converting the function back to source via .toString(). These parameters are not supplied when calling a() and b()!

(Note that the c() function here is identical to the one in my other answer.)

rxArgs = /^[^(]+\(([^)]+)\)/;

function a(v, w, x){
    v = 9;
    w = 2;
    x = 7;

    var args = rxArgs.exec(arguments.callee.toString())[1].split(", ");
    var i = args.length, values = {};

    while (i--) values[args[i]] = eval(args[i]);

    func(c('{w} + {x} = {v}', values));
}

function b(v, y, z){
    v = 1;
    y = 'hello';
    z = 'world';

    var args = rxArgs.exec(arguments.callee.toString())[1].split(", ");
    var i = args.length, values = {};

    while (i--) values[args[i]] = eval(args[i]);

    func(c('{v}. {y} {z}', values));
}

function c(template, values) {
    return template.replace(/{(.*?)}/g, function(match) {
        return values[match[1]];
    });
}

At this point, however, you're introducing so much boilerplate into each function that you're probably better off simply inlining c() instead.

function a(){
    var v = 9;
    var w = 2;
    var x = 7;

    func('{w} + {x} = {v}'.replace(/{(.*?)}/g, function(match) {
        return eval(match[1]);
    }));
}

function b(){
    var v = 1;
    var y = 'hello';
    var z = 'world';

    func('{v}. {y} {z}'.replace(/{(.*?)}/g, function(match) {
        return eval(match[1]);
    }));
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's interesting what you did there. It's possible to take this approach one step further and pass the arguments object into c(), and let c() build the values object from it the way you did before parsing the template. –  Orr Siloni Jan 21 '11 at 8:02
    
@Orr — I'm not sure I follow. When (mis)using the function parameters this way, the new values do not find their way into arguments (at least, not on Firefox). i.e. (function(a, b) { a = 5; b = 7; console.log(arguments); })() produces an empty array. –  Ben Blank Jan 22 '11 at 21:38
    
I have to say, though, this is an absolutely fascinating problem! :-) –  Ben Blank Jan 22 '11 at 21:40

I would strongly suggest having your code really parse the templates and interpret the "{foo}" references explicitly in your own code, instead of using eval() for everything.

It's not really clear why code like your "a()" and "b()" examples even need a template mechanism. In a language with first-class function objects like Javascript, what your code seems suspiciously desirous of achieving can be done much better by just programming functionally.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer Pointy. Like I stated, the example I've given in the question is very simplified. In effect I have very long templates that parse many different variables and attributes from different objects. I want a single mechanism to patch it all together into a single string, rather than functionally build that output manually for each instance. –  Orr Siloni Jan 20 '11 at 20:48
    
@Orr Siloni well eval() is seriously a deprecated way of doing things. It's your software so of course you should do whatever you think is best, but my experience suggests that this is a really bad idea, and that there's definitely a better, more maintainable way to achieve what you want. –  Pointy Jan 20 '11 at 21:17

EDIT:

Your question seems to imply that the values will be coming from the caller. If they're all coming that way, you could just pass along the arguments object to c.

Then in the c function, grab the next item in the arguments object you passed for each match in the template.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/u99Bj/1/

function a(){
    var template = '{w} + {x} = {v}';
    c(template,arguments);
}

function b(){
    var template = '{v}. {y} {z}';
    c(template,arguments);
}

function c( template, args ){
    var re = /{(.+?)}/;
    var i = 0;
    var match = template.match(re);
    while (match != null){
        template = template.replace(re, args[i++]);
        match = template.match(re);
    }
    alert(template);
}

If some of the functions will have some static values, then you would need to convert the arguments into an Array, and supplement the Array as needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Because he wants to be able to write the templates such that local-scope variables are directly referenced. –  Pointy Jan 20 '11 at 18:01
    
@Pointy: Yes, you're right. I didn't look at what c was attempting to do. –  user113716 Jan 20 '11 at 18:05
    
Updated my answer. –  user113716 Jan 20 '11 at 18:12
    
Thanks patrick. There are two major problems with passing the arguments (pseudo) array: 1. the templates will need to be "{args[0]} + {args[1} = {args[2]}" instead of the readable form "{w} + {x} = {v}"; 2. imagine a template with dozens of variables references. Now I add/remove a variable - all the indexes of {args[x]} need to be changed. It would be a nightmare to maintain. –  Orr Siloni Jan 20 '11 at 20:51
    
@Orr Siloni: I see, you're saying that some of the values may be reused at more than one point in the template? –  user113716 Jan 20 '11 at 21:06

Can't you do that :

function c(template,caller)
{ ... 
}

and call

c(template,this)

then you could just get the variables as members of this (passing the function as an object instead of passing its scope)

EDIT

What about this approach?

function a(){
    this.v = 9;
    this.w = 2;
    this.x = 7;
    this.template = '{w} + {x} = {v}';
}

function c(obj){
    var template = obj.template;
    var re = /{(.+?)}/;
    var match = template.match(re);
    while (match != null){
        template = template.replace(re, obj[match[1]]);
        match = template.match(re);
    }
    alert(template);
}

<input type="button" value="a" onclick="c(new a())"/><br/>
share|improve this answer
1  
Because that won't work. The local variables of a function scope are not properties of the function object. There is no way to obtain a reference to the scope "object" for a function invocation. –  Pointy Jan 20 '11 at 18:18
    
@Pointy edited my answer to suggest another approach –  Damp Jan 20 '11 at 18:48
    
Pointy, Damp - this is pretty much the same as hungryMind's idea. See my reply to him above. –  Orr Siloni Jan 20 '11 at 21:08

What about this, using simply this keyword

<script type="text/javascript">
function a(){
    this.v = 9;
    this.w = 2;
    this.x = 7;
    var template = '{w} + {x} = {v}';
    c(template);
}

function b(){
    this.v = 1;
    this.y = 'hello';
    this.z = 'world';
    var template = '{v}. {y} {z}';
    c(template);
}

function c(template){
    var re = /{(.+?)}/;
    var match = template.match(re);
    while (match != null){
        template = template.replace(re, eval(match[1]));
        match = template.match(re);
    }
    alert(template);
}
</script>

All variables will be initialized in document by default. You can encapsulate in other objects. Be careful about optional variables, as they may not be cleared on method call, and may interfere with parsing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks hungryMind. Again, this is similar to the approach of packing all the variables into an object, which is impractical to me when I have dozens of data points, some of them calculated local variables, others are attributes from several different object in my app. What I need is for the parsing function c to somehow have the same scope as the caller function. –  Orr Siloni Jan 20 '11 at 21:05

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