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private int bitToIntParser
(byte[] recordData, int byteOffset, int byteLength, int bitOffset, int bitLength)
        {
            //step1:Byte[] selectedBytes = recordData[byteOffset to byteOffset + Length]  
            //step2:BitArray selectedBits=selectdBytes.bits[bitOffset to bitOffset+bitLength]
            //step3:convert selectedBit to Int          
        }

The above function should be able to extract bytes[byteOffset] to bytes[byteOffset+length] from recordData and then extract bit[bitOffset] to bit[bitOffset+BitLength] from the previous result and convert it to int.

Can any one please help me with this?

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2  
what have you tried so far? –  BrokenGlass Jan 20 '11 at 18:46
    
for step1 I have used byte[] workingSet = new byte[4]; Buffer.BlockCopy(recordData, byteOffset, workingSet, 0, length); but then I'm not sure how to extract requested bits from it , I tried shifting but couldn't get result –  Asha Jan 20 '11 at 18:51
    
Any constraints on the bitOffset and bitLength parameters? –  Henk Holterman Jan 20 '11 at 18:51
    
@Henk : it should not be more than 32 bits so we can use BitVector32 –  Asha Jan 20 '11 at 18:53
    
What the correct result for such input? recordData: {00001111b 11110000b} byteOffset:0 byteLength:2 bitOffset:4 bitLength:8 –  Alex Jan 20 '11 at 18:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Wow, this has turned into some very messy code. We'll have to do the bit shifting manually, since you could potentially involve more than four bytes in this operation depending upon your bit location. Assuming little endian byte order (LSB first):

// No need for byte length, since you're passing in a bit count
private int ParseByteArray(byte[] recordData, int offset, int bitOffset, 
       int bitCount)
{
    if(bitCount < 1 || bitCount > 32) 
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("bitCount must be between 1 and 32");
    }

     int output = 0;
    int byteCount = 0;

    byte rightMask = (byte)(((1 << bitOffset) - 1) << (8 - bitOffset));
    byte leftMask = (byte)(255 ^ rightMask);

    while (bitCount > 0)
    {
        byte data = (byte)(((recordData[offset] & leftMask) << bitOffset) + 
                    ((bitCount > 8 - bitOffset ? 
                    ((recordData[offset + 1] & rightMask) >> (8 - bitOffset)) 
                    : 0)));

        if (bitCount < 8)
        {
            byte mask = (byte)(255^((1 << (8 - bitCount)) - 1));

            data = (byte)((data & mask) >> (8 - bitCount));
        }

        offset++;

        output += data << (byteCount * 8);

        byteCount++;

        bitCount -= Math.Min(bitCount, 8);
    }

    return output;
}
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ParseByteArray(new byte[]{0xFF, 0xA},1,4,3) // fail ( –  Alex Jan 20 '11 at 19:22
    
@Alex: Good catch; corrected –  Adam Robinson Jan 20 '11 at 19:28

It seems to me that the byteLength and bitLength are redundant (the offsets too).

But as it stands, I would say:

  • make an 8 byte intermediate array
  • copy byteLength bytes (1..4) to that array, probably from offset 7-byteLength
  • use BitConvertor.ToInt64() to turn it into a long
  • value = (int) (longValue >> bitOffset)

This still has open ends (do you expect signed or unsigned int32's ? )

I didn't test this, you may have endian issues as well.

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byteLength is redundant, but not necessarily bitOffset. While you could represent the entire offset in bits (making it genuinely redundant), I took it as the bit offset within a byte where the number starts, meaning that the final 8-bitOffset bits come from the first 8-bitOffset bits of the following byte. –  Adam Robinson Jan 20 '11 at 19:29
    
@Adam: byteOffset and bitOffset could be easily combined. The lengths are more strongly related. It would be a 'nicer' interface with just a bit-range –  Henk Holterman Jan 20 '11 at 19:35
    
I need the byte length because of performance, the recordData might be a large array . and I also need BitLength because we may just want bit 2 and 3 from a byte so we will call the function with bitoffset = 2 and bitLength = 2 , i think the way you explained won't work in case like what I just explained –  Asha Jan 20 '11 at 20:31
    
@Asna: You will always need to have byteLength == (bitLength+7) / 8. But you're right, my solution doesn't mask of the left bits. I'll leave it at this. –  Henk Holterman Jan 20 '11 at 21:46

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