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I am learning WCF and one of the challenges I am faced with today is to implement this design:

[DataContract]
public class MyOwnFaultException : FaultException<MyResult> 
{
   public MyOwnFaultException(MyResult result) : base(result) {}
}

[DataContract]
public class MyResult 
{
    readonly DefinedResults dres;

    public MyResult(DefinedResults res) {
        dres = res;
    }

    [DataMember]
    public DefinedResults DRes 
    {
        get { return this.dres; }
        //do not want to have the setter for this, but w.o it .net throws exception
    }
}

[DataContract]
public enum DefinedResults 
{ 
    Success = 0,
    Fail = 1,
}

Service

[OperationContract]
[FaultContract(typeof(MyOwnFaultException))]
void TestRemoteException();

So, naturally when I try to create a reference to my 'faulty' service I get the "No Set For DRes member" exception which is understood. But how to I implement the readonly field pattern to the value object used for result indicator?

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2 Answers 2

This is because services share schema and contract, not class.

Having said that, you could hack it by doing:

[DataMember]
public DefinedResults DRes 
{
    get { return this.dres; }
    private set { /* NOOP */ }
}
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It is late at night, so perhaps I'm already tired but I don't see the point of this solution. It is clever solution but how will this help to solve the whole thing? Yes you will get a value object on the server side BUT - creating proxy as service reference will generate new object with public get and set. Reusing same type on a client will not work because property will never be set. So as I understand it, it solves Value object dilema on the server but client will be able to modify the value or will not be able to get the value. –  Ladislav Mrnka Jan 20 '11 at 23:13

There is no value object when using WCF. All object received and send by operation must be serializable - must have parameterless constructor (as marc pointed in comment this is not necessary for DataContractSerializer) and all serialized field must be writable. If you want to send object which is not serializable you can implement IDataContractSurrogate or just implement your own Data transfer object (DTO).

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3  
Actually, for the DataContractSerializer, classes do not need any parameterless constructor (that's only for the XmlSerializer).... see danrigsby.com/blog/index.php/2008/03/07/… for explanation –  marc_s Jan 20 '11 at 20:45
    
@marc: Thanks, I didn't know about that but by reading the article it makes sense. –  Ladislav Mrnka Jan 20 '11 at 23:01

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