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Lets say I have a polymorphic class Structure like that

class Base
{
//some implementation
};

class Deriv: public Base
{
//implementation
}

class Case1
{
  boost::scoped_ptr<A> a_ //polymorphic data member owned by C
public:
  Case1(A* a):a_(a)
  {

  }
};
class Case2
{
  boost::scoped_ptr<A> a_ //polymorphic data member owned by C
public:
  Case2(std::auto_ptr<A> a):a_( a.release() )
  {

  }
};

And I've got a third class case1/2 which owns one of those polymorphic object described above. Now I need to pass a pointer to a Base/Deriv object to the constructor of the case1/2 class which takes ownership of this object. Should I pass this object as a smart pointer e.g. auto_ptr to make it clear I'm takin care of this object, or allow raw pointers( case 1 ) to allow a much simpler syntax like

Case1 c(new Deriv);
//compared to 
Case2 c(std::auto_ptr<Base>(new Deriv));
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to pass a smart pointer and you need to name that smart pointer (e.g., it can't be a temporary):

std::auto_ptr<Base> p(new Deriv);
Case2 c(p); // this constructor would need to take the `auto_ptr` by reference 
            // so that it can steal ownership.

In your first example, Case1 c(new Deriv);, the object could be leaked if an exception is thrown between when new Deriv is executed and when the Case1 object takes ownership of it in its constructor.

In your second example, where you don't name the smart pointer, the object could be leaked in some circumstances. Notably, this can happen if you have more than one argument to a function.

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You mean in the exactly zero code that occurs in between? I also don't get why it can't be temporary. –  Puppy Jan 20 '11 at 21:16
    
@DeadMG: Zero code in between where? If the Case1 constructor does anything that could throw an exception before it assigns the raw pointer argument to a smart pointer, the object will be leaked. I've added a link to Herb Sutter's GOTW article on the subject. It's not an issue if the constructor takes only one argument, but even so, most good coding styles (including the Boost guidelines) recommend naming all smart pointers for this reason. –  James McNellis Jan 20 '11 at 21:17
    
@James: When he calls Case1 c(new Deriv); then first Deriv is constructed, and then Case1 takes ownership of it. There is no code in the middle that could possibly throw. Edit: That loophole is talking about C++98. You will have to find another article to demonstrate that it still exists in C++03, which as far as I know, mainly existed to fix defects like this. –  Puppy Jan 20 '11 at 21:18
1  
@DeadMG: I think in this particular case there's no risk of leak, but @James is trying to explain a good rule of thumb: Never pass a new-ed pointer to a temporary smart pointer. If you don't always follow that rule, subtle changes later can cause leaks for reasons not obvious. –  aschepler Jan 20 '11 at 21:22
1  
@DeadMG: Basically what @aschepler said. The OP said that his code is like what he showed in the question. As soon as we are dealing with example code and not real code, the question becomes about best practices. The best practice here is always to name your smart pointers and avoid passing raw pointers to unowned dynamically allocated objects. –  James McNellis Jan 20 '11 at 21:28

If your class totally owns the object passed to it, then you are best to make that explicit via the use of auto_ptr in all applicable cases. Having to construct the auto_ptr explicitly is the best case because it enforces that the API user knows that you own that object and reduces the likelyhood of ownership mixups.

If your class has variable ownership, then typically, the way that it's done is to provide a raw pointer and a destruction function.

class best_practices {
    std::function<void(A*)> destructor;
    A* ptr;
public:
    best_practices(A* a, std::function<void(A*)> destructfunc)
        : ptr(a), destructor(destructfunc) {}
    ~best_practices() {
        destructor(ptr);
    }
};
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Your example code exemplifies the issue I describe in my answer: the copy constructor of std::function<void(A*)> can throw an exception (and it may very well do so; for example, a dynamic allocation may fail). If it does throw, then you've leaked the A object passed to the constructor. –  James McNellis Jan 20 '11 at 21:23
    
(On an only tangentially related note, your example class is missing a copy constructor and copy assignment operator.) –  James McNellis Jan 20 '11 at 21:25
    
If dynamic allocation fails, I've got much bigger problems than a leaked object. –  Puppy Jan 20 '11 at 21:28
    
"If that exception happens I don't care because I can't do anything about it" is no excuse for writing incorrect, unsafe code. In this case, std::bad_alloc is just one exception that could be thrown; it's the only one I can think of off the top of my head, but I would guess other exceptions could potentially be thrown. Do you know for sure that no other exception could be thrown? –  James McNellis Jan 20 '11 at 21:31

I don't have a source for this being a best practice, but in general if you're going to store a resource in some way, I find it's best to acquire that resource in the same way.

The reason for this is that in C++0x, the copying/moving is done when the argument is given, then you just move it into storage, such as:

struct store_string
{
    store_string(std::string s) : // potentially free, copy if not
    s(std::move(s)) // free
    {}

    std::string s;
};

Or in C++03, if your type can be cheaply default constructed:

struct store_string
{
    store_string(std::string ss) // make necessary copy
    {
        s.swap(ss); // free
    }

    std::string s;
};

So for you, I would do:

class Case2
{
    boost::scoped_ptr<A> a_ //polymorphic data member owned by C
public:
    Case2(boost::scoped_ptr<A>& aa)
    {
        a.swap(aa); // take resource
    }
};

This makes things simple for you, and lets the client know exactly how the resource is going to be managed.

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