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I need a class that redirects one ostream to another ostream during the lifetime of its object. After some tinkering I came up with this:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>


class ScopedRedirect
{
public:
    ScopedRedirect(std::ostream & inOriginal, std::ostream & inRedirect) :
        mOriginal(inOriginal),
        mRedirect(inRedirect)
    {
        mOriginal.rdbuf(mRedirect.rdbuf(mOriginal.rdbuf()));
    }

    ~ScopedRedirect()
    {
        mOriginal.rdbuf(mRedirect.rdbuf(mOriginal.rdbuf()));
    }    

private:
    ScopedRedirect(const ScopedRedirect&);
    ScopedRedirect& operator=(const ScopedRedirect&);

    std::ostream & mOriginal;
    std::ostream & mRedirect;
};


int main()
{
    std::cout << "Before redirect." << std::endl;
    std::ofstream filestream("redirected.txt");
    {
        ScopedRedirect redirect(std::cout, filestream);
        std::cout << "During redirect." << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << "After redirect." << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

It seems to work fine. However, it's weird that the following line is repeated in both the constructor and destructor:

mOriginal.rdbuf(mRedirect.rdbuf(mOriginal.rdbuf()));

I think it's correct, but I would like to verify with the SO community. Can you find any errors or dangers in this code?

Edit

Make non-copyable.

share|improve this question
4  
+1 - It should be correct -- but it would be better if you implemented your logic in terms of a generic std::ostream rather than calling std::cout directly. – Billy ONeal Jan 20 '11 at 22:06
1  
@Billy ONeal: Isn't ScopedRedirect implemented in terms of a generic ostream already? The std::cout is only used in the sample. – StackedCrooked Jan 20 '11 at 22:11
    
I'm not saying your class is bad or incorrect. I'm just saying it'd be better to send output to where you want it to actually go than to redirect where it's going after the fact. That is, I'm saying the code that relies on std::cout pointing to any particular location should be refactored rather than changing where cout points. – Billy ONeal Jan 20 '11 at 22:30
    
@Billy ONeal: Ah I see. I definitely agree with you. The reason I needed this class was because I wanted to turn off debug messages produced by a big legacy codebase. It's a (hopefully) temporary fix. – StackedCrooked Jan 20 '11 at 22:44
up vote 11 down vote accepted

The reason those lines are the same is because what you're doing is swapping the buffers. (That is, you "redirect" by swapping the original buffer with the redirect buffer; restoration is the swap back.)

While this might give you the intended effect with respect to the output stream, it's not correct because the redirect stream now outputs somewhere else. To redirect means to take one stream and make it output somewhere else; note this doesn't effect that 'somewhere else'.

Your class is not a redirect; as is, it should really be named ScopedStreamSwap. For example, try this instead:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

class ScopedRedirect
{
public:
    ScopedRedirect(std::ostream & inOriginal, std::ostream & inRedirect) :
        mOriginal(inOriginal),
        mRedirect(inRedirect)
    {
        mOriginal.rdbuf(mRedirect.rdbuf(mOriginal.rdbuf()));
    }

    ~ScopedRedirect()
    {
        mOriginal.rdbuf(mRedirect.rdbuf(mOriginal.rdbuf()));
    }    

private:
    ScopedRedirect(const ScopedRedirect&);
    ScopedRedirect& operator=(const ScopedRedirect&);

    std::ostream & mOriginal;
    std::ostream & mRedirect;
};


int main()
{
    std::cout << "Before redirect." << std::endl;
    std::ofstream filestream("redirected.txt");
    {
        ScopedRedirect redirect(std::cout, filestream);
        std::cout << "During redirect." << std::endl;

        // oops:
        filestream << "also to the file, right?...nope" << std::endl;
        filestream << "ah, why am i on the screen?!" << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << "After redirect." << std::endl;

    // in main, return 0 is implicit, if there is no return statement;
    // helpful to keep in mind in snippets and short things
}

What you want is this:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

class ScopedRedirect
{
public:
    ScopedRedirect(std::ostream & inOriginal, std::ostream & inRedirect) :
        mOriginal(inOriginal),
        mOldBuffer(inOriginal.rdbuf(inRedirect.rdbuf()))
    { }

    ~ScopedRedirect()
    {
        mOriginal.rdbuf(mOldBuffer);
    }    

private:
    ScopedRedirect(const ScopedRedirect&);
    ScopedRedirect& operator=(const ScopedRedirect&);

    std::ostream & mOriginal;
    std::streambuf * mOldBuffer;
};


int main()
{
    std::cout << "Before redirect." << std::endl;
    std::ofstream filestream("redirected.txt");
    {
        ScopedRedirect redirect(std::cout, filestream);
        std::cout << "During redirect." << std::endl;

        // yay:
        filestream << "also to the file, right?...yes" << std::endl;
        filestream << "i am not on the screen" << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << "After redirect." << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being interesting and informative, and for hilarious example text. – Billy ONeal Jan 20 '11 at 22:43
    
Thanks for posting a working fix. I had come to realize that I was simply swapping the buffers, but I strangely was unable to do it differently. For some reason the syntax confuses me a lot. – StackedCrooked Jan 20 '11 at 22:55

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