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This is more of an implementation question. MainWindow has a serial port object that exposes a SendData(byte[] data) method. MainWindow also has a tab control that is populated at runtime through an external XML file. These controls interact with the serial port, receiving and sending data.

For sending, user can click 'Send' and it needs to call MainWindow.SendData(). The question is how to make the control call MainWindow.SendData() without making reference to MainWindow (I could move SendData() to another class, etc).

class MainWindow {
    SerialPort serialport;
    public MainWindow {
        // parse XML and add tabs to tabcontrol
        int tabcount = xmlreader.GetNodeCount(xpath);
        for (int i = 0; i<tabcount; i++) {
        tabitems[i] = new TabClass(tabname, ref tabControl);
    }
    public void SendData(byte[] data){
        serialport.Write(data,0,data.Length);
    }
}

class TabClass {
    TabItem tabitem;
    public TabClass(tabname, ref tabControl){
        tabitem = new TabItem();
        tabcontrol.Items.Add(tabitem);
        // add all controls (coming from xml)
        for (int i = 0; i < nrControls; i++) {
            // add control here, i.e. CommandControl
        }
    }
}    
class CommandControl {
    public Button_Click(){
        // Need to call SendData here!!
    }
}

First thing that comes to mind is to pass a SendData delegate to TabClass, then have TabClass pass a delegate to each custom control that gets added. I could pass through each class constructor or I could make the delegates public and have MainWindow write directly to them.

The problem I have is that I have do create and declare the delegate in every single user control and the main TabControl. If I decide to change the implementation, I would have to change the declaration in every single user control. Of course I would still have to modify the control to incorporate the new implementation, but I would like to avoid rewriting declarations in all controls.

The question: is there any other way to expose SendData() delegate from MainWindow without referencing MainWindow? I would like to declare just once and share among all controls.

share|improve this question
    
So you have multiple tabs reading from and writing to the same serial port? –  Austin Salonen Jan 20 '11 at 22:56
    
Not directly. SendData() is actually a SerialPort manager that enqueues data from all the controls from multiple tabs that need to send data out. All the tabs are also receiving data from the same SerialPort, through a ReceiveData() that manages all incoming data. –  PaulG Jan 21 '11 at 19:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use a Singleton class, or simply a static class.

That would have to align with having exactly one output channel, which seems the case.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you give me a quick example? I tried that without success. I cannot call a non-static method (serialport.SendData) from a static class. I also tried to create a static class that only contains a delegate to MainWindow.SendData, but again it would not let me do it. –  PaulG Jan 20 '11 at 22:54
    
Your static/Singleton will have to a) own the SerialPort or b) link up to the MainForm. –  Henk Holterman Jan 20 '11 at 23:31

You don't need delegate for this.
User helper class.

class SerialWrapper {
    SerialPort serialport;  
    public void SendData(byte[] data){
        serialport.Write(data,0,data.Length);
    }
}

class MainWindow {
    SerialWrapper serialWrapper;
    public MainWindow {
        // parse XML and add tabs to tabcontrol
        int tabcount = xmlreader.GetNodeCount(xpath);
        for (int i = 0; i<tabcount; i++) {
        tabitems[i] = new TabClass(tabname, ref tabControl,serialWrapper);
    }
    public void SendData(byte[] data){
        serialWrapper.SendData(data);
    }
}

update:

class CommandControl {
    public CommandControl(SerialWrapper serialWrapper)
    {
          this.serialWrapper=serialWrapper;
    }

    public Button_Click(){
        serialWrapper.SendData();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would still have to reference MainWindow with this since MainWindow creates it and owns the port. A static class seems more fitting. –  PaulG Jan 21 '11 at 19:35
    
@PaulG : according to my example, you need only reference to SerialWrapper class –  Avram Jan 22 '11 at 4:14

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