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I'd like to format following numbers into the numbers next to them with java:

1000 to 1k
5821 to 5.8k
10500 to 10k
101800 to 101k
2000000 to 2m
7800000 to 7.8m
92150000 to 92m
123200000 to 123m

The number on the right will be long or integer the number on the left will be string. How should I approach this. I already did little algorithm for this but I thought there might be already something invented out there that does nicer job at it and doesn't require additional testing if I start dealing with billions and trillions :)

Additional Requirements:

  • The format should have maximum of 4 characters
  • The above means 1.1k is OK 11.2k is not. Same for 7.8m is OK 19.1m is not. Only one digit before decimal point is allowed to have decimal point. Two digits before decimal point means not digits after decimal point.
  • No rounding is necessary
share|improve this question
1  
If no one has a library would you mind posting your code? –  Grammin Jan 20 '11 at 22:15
    
This may assist, though this isn't a dup. stackoverflow.com/questions/529432 –  rfeak Jan 20 '11 at 22:22
1  
Should 101800 become 102k? –  Feanor Jan 20 '11 at 22:28
1  
@Mat I was curious as to what solution you were using before. If you don't mind would you post it as an answer as well. –  jzd Jan 21 '11 at 18:49

9 Answers 9

up vote 24 down vote accepted

I know, this looks more like a C program, but it's super lightweight!

public static void main(String args[]) {
    long[] numbers = new long[]{1000, 5821, 10500, 101800, 2000000, 7800000, 92150000, 123200000, 9999999};
    for(long n : numbers) {
        System.out.println(n + " => " + coolFormat(n, 0));
    }
}

private static char[] c = new char[]{'k', 'm', 'b', 't'};

/**
 * Recursive implementation, invokes itself for each factor of a thousand, increasing the class on each invokation.
 * @param n the number to format
 * @param iteration in fact this is the class from the array c
 * @return a String representing the number n formatted in a cool looking way.
 */
private static String coolFormat(double n, int iteration) {
    double d = ((long) n / 100) / 10.0;
    boolean isRound = (d * 10) %10 == 0;//true if the decimal part is equal to 0 (then it's trimmed anyway)
    return (d < 1000? //this determines the class, i.e. 'k', 'm' etc
        ((d > 99.9 || isRound || (!isRound && d > 9.99)? //this decides whether to trim the decimals
         (int) d * 10 / 10 : d + "" // (int) d * 10 / 10 drops the decimal
         ) + "" + c[iteration]) 
        : coolFormat(d, iteration+1));

}

It outputs:

1000 => 1k
5821 => 5.8k
10500 => 10k
101800 => 101k
2000000 => 2m
7800000 => 7.8m
92150000 => 92m
123200000 => 123m
9999999 => 9.9m
share|improve this answer
    
Is outputting 9.9m for 9999999 desirable? –  Michael McGowan Jan 20 '11 at 23:30
3  
His example shows "10500 to 11k" so I'd say he wants rounding. –  Gabe Jan 20 '11 at 23:41
1  
No problem jzd, anytime. I fixed the algorithm to return up to 4 chars. Plus added comments. –  Elijah Saounkine Jan 21 '11 at 6:47
3  
Obfuscated code. We don't have to code like this nowadays. May work as expected, but I'd encourage the author to have a look at Roger C. Martin:Clean Code –  Andreas_D Jan 21 '11 at 7:10
12  
Obfuscated? I beg your pardon, but you probably read one book and think you can code somehow differently nowadays. Tell Joel (joelonsoftware.com/articles/ThePerilsofJavaSchools.html) about that. I dare any code you can possibly write to get anywhere close to the speed of my method! –  Elijah Saounkine Jan 21 '11 at 7:20

Here a solution that makes use of DecimalFormat's engineering notation:

public static void main(String args[]) {
    long[] numbers = new long[]{7, 12, 856, 1000, 5821, 10500, 101800, 2000000, 7800000, 92150000, 123200000, 9999999};
    for(long number : numbers) {
        System.out.println(number + " = " + format(number));
    }
}

private static String[] suffix = new String[]{"","k", "m", "b", "t"};
private static int MAX_LENGTH = 4;

private static String format(double number) {
    String r = new DecimalFormat("##0E0").format(number);
    r = r.replaceAll("E[0-9]", suffix[Character.getNumericValue(r.charAt(r.length() - 1)) / 3]);
    while(r.length() > MAX_LENGTH || r.matches("[0-9]+\\.[a-z]")){
        r = r.substring(0, r.length()-2) + r.substring(r.length() - 1);
    }
    return r;
}

Output:

7 = 7
12 = 12
856 = 856
1000 = 1k
5821 = 5.8k
10500 = 10k
101800 = 102k
2000000 = 2m
7800000 = 7.8m
92150000 = 92m
123200000 = 123m
9999999 = 10m
share|improve this answer
    
@Mat Updated to handle new requirements –  jzd Jan 21 '11 at 2:24
    
Is there an easy way to combine this with Currency Instance to get similar functionality with currency? –  xdumaine Nov 3 '11 at 13:10
    
@roviuser, not sure what you mean, but this sounds like a separate question. –  jzd Nov 8 '11 at 12:45
    
Thanks, very helpful. I'd also add a check for number < 1000 to leave numbers like 856 as is (currently such numbers are trimmed: 856 -> 800) –  ernazm Jun 26 '13 at 13:55
1  
rounds 160000 to 200k and also rounds 120000 down to 100k –  k1komans Jan 17 at 20:32

Need some improvement, but: StrictMath to the rescue!
You can put the suffix in a String or array and fetch'em based on power, or something like that.
The division can also be managed around the power, i think almost everything is about the power value. Hope it helps!

public static String formatValue(double value) {
int power; 
    String suffix = " kmbt";
    String formattedNumber = "";

    NumberFormat formatter = new DecimalFormat("#,###.#");
    power = (int)StrictMath.log10(value);
    value = value/(Math.pow(10,(power/3)*3));
    formattedNumber=formatter.format(value);
    formattedNumber = formattedNumber + suffix.charAt(power/3);
    return formattedNumber.length()>4 ?  formattedNumber.replaceAll("\\.[0-9]+", "") : formattedNumber;  
}

outputs:

999
1.2k
98k
911k
1.1m
11b
712b
34t

share|improve this answer
1  
Improved readability a bit, Just needed to add return statement from jzd to solve the 4 char issue. And remember to add suffix if going over t to avoid AIOOB exception. ;) –  jhurtado Jan 21 '11 at 5:13
    
This code is sensitive to locale, for example in sv_SE locale 1000 converts to 10x10³, which is not matched correctly by the regexp. –  Joakim Lundborg Feb 5 at 22:53

My Java is rusty, but here's how I'd implement it in C#:

private string  FormatNumber(double value)
    {
    string[]  suffixes = new string[] {" k", " m", " b", " t", " q"};
    for (int j = suffixes.Length;  j > 0;  j--)
        {
        double  unit = Math.Pow(1000, j);
        if (value >= unit)
            return (value / unit).ToString("#,##0.0") + suffixes[--j];
        }
    return value.ToString("#,##0");
    }

It'd be easy to adjust this to use CS kilos (1,024) rather than metric kilos, or to add more units. It formats 1,000 as "1.0 k" rather than "1 k", but I trust that's immaterial.

To meet the more specific requirement "no more than four characters", remove the spaces before the suffixes and adjust the middle block like this:

if (value >= unit)
  {
  value /= unit;
  return (value).ToString(value >= unit * 9.95 ? "#,##0" : "#,##0.0") + suffixes[--j];
  }
share|improve this answer

The ICU lib has a rule based formatter for numbers, which can be used for number spellout etc. I think using ICU would give you a readable and maintanable solution.

[Usage]

The right class is RuleBasedNumberFormat. The format itself can be stored as separate file (or as String constant, IIRC).

Example from http://userguide.icu-project.org/formatparse/numbers

double num = 2718.28;
NumberFormat formatter = 
    new RuleBasedNumberFormat(RuleBasedNumberFormat.SPELLOUT);
String result = formatter.format(num);
System.out.println(result);

The same page shows Roman numerals, so I guess your case should be possible, too.

share|improve this answer

My favorite. You could use "k" and so on as indicator for decimal too, as common in the electronic domain. This will give you an extra digit without additional space

Second column tries to use as much digits as possible

1000 => 1.0k | 1000
5821 => 5.8k | 5821
10500 => 10k | 10k5
101800 => 101k | 101k
2000000 => 2.0m | 2m
7800000 => 7.8m | 7m8
92150000 => 92m | 92m1
123200000 => 123m | 123m
9999999 => 9.9m | 9m99

This is the code

public class HTTest {
private static String[] unit = {"u", "k", "m", "g", "t"};
/**
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] numbers = new int[]{1000, 5821, 10500, 101800, 2000000, 7800000, 92150000, 123200000, 9999999};
    for(int n : numbers) {
        System.out.println(n + " => " + myFormat(n) + " | " + myFormat2(n));
    }
}

private static String myFormat(int pN) {
    String str = Integer.toString(pN);
    int len = str.length ()-1;
    int level = len / 3;
    int mode = len % 3;
    switch (mode) {
    case 0: return str.substring(0, 1) + "." + str.substring(1, 2) + unit[level];
    case 1: return str.substring(0, 2) + unit[level];
    case 2: return str.substring(0, 3) + unit[level];
    }
    return "how that?";
}
private static String trim1 (String pVal) {
    if (pVal.equals("0")) return "";
    return pVal;
}
private static String trim2 (String pVal) {
    if (pVal.equals("00")) return "";
    return pVal.substring(0, 1) + trim1(pVal.substring(1,2));
}
private static String myFormat2(int pN) {
    String str = Integer.toString(pN);
    int len = str.length () - 1;
    if (len <= 3) return str;
    int level = len / 3;
    int mode = len % 3;
    switch (mode) {
    case 0: return str.substring(0, 1) + unit[level] + trim2(str.substring(1, 3));
    case 2: return str.substring(0, 3) + unit[level];
    case 1: return str.substring(0, 2) + unit[level] + trim1(str.substring(2, 3));
    }
    return "how that?";
}
}
share|improve this answer

I don't know if it's the best approach but, this is what i did.

7=>7
12=>12
856=>856
1000=>1.0k
5821=>5.82k
10500=>10.5k
101800=>101.8k
2000000=>2.0m
7800000=>7.8m
92150000=>92.15m
123200000=>123.2m
9999999=>10.0m

--- Code---

public String Format(Integer number){
    String[] suffix = new String[]{"k","m","b","t"};
    int size = (number.intValue() != 0) ? (int) Math.log10(number) : 0;
    if (size >= 3){
        while (size % 3 != 0) {
            size = size - 1;
        }
    }
    double notation = Math.pow(10, size);
    String result = (size >= 3) ? + (Math.round((number / notation) * 100) / 100.0d)+suffix[(size/3) - 1] : + number + "";
    return result
}
share|improve this answer

Problems with Current Answers

  • Many of the current solutions are using these prefixes k=103, m=106, b=109, t=1012. However, according to various sources, the correct prefixes are k=103, M=106, G=109, T=1012
  • Lack of support for negative numbers (or at least a lack of tests demonstrating that negative numbers are supported)
  • Lack of support for the inverse operation, e.g. converting 1.1k to 1100 (though this is outside the scope of the original question)

Java Solution

This solution (an extension of this answer) addresses the above issues.

import org.apache.commons.lang.math.NumberUtils;

import java.text.DecimalFormat;
import java.text.FieldPosition;
import java.text.Format;
import java.text.ParsePosition;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;


/**
 * Converts a number to a string in <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_prefix">metric prefix</a> format.
 * For example, 7800000 will be formatted as '7.8M'. Numbers under 1000 will be unchanged. Refer to the tests for further examples.
 */
class RoundedMetricPrefixFormat extends Format {

    private static final String[] METRIC_PREFIXES = new String[]{"", "k", "M", "G", "T"};

    /**
     * The maximum number of characters in the output, excluding the negative sign
     */
    private static final Integer MAX_LENGTH = 4;

    private static final Pattern TRAILING_DECIMAL_POINT = Pattern.compile("[0-9]+\\.[kMGT]");

    private static final Pattern METRIC_PREFIXED_NUMBER = Pattern.compile("\\-?[0-9]+(\\.[0-9])?[kMGT]");

    @Override
    public StringBuffer format(Object obj, StringBuffer output, FieldPosition pos) {

        Double number = Double.valueOf(obj.toString());

        // if the number is negative, convert it to a positive number and add the minus sign to the output at the end
        boolean isNegative = number < 0;
        number = Math.abs(number);

        String result = new DecimalFormat("##0E0").format(number);

        Integer index = Character.getNumericValue(result.charAt(result.length() - 1)) / 3;
        result = result.replaceAll("E[0-9]", METRIC_PREFIXES[index]);

        while (result.length() > MAX_LENGTH || TRAILING_DECIMAL_POINT.matcher(result).matches()) {
            int length = result.length();
            result = result.substring(0, length - 2) + result.substring(length - 1);
        }

        return output.append(isNegative ? "-" + result : result);
    }

    /**
     * Convert a String produced by <tt>format()</tt> back to a number. This will generally not restore
     * the original number because <tt>format()</tt> is a lossy operation, e.g.
     *
     * <pre>
     * {@code
     * def formatter = new RoundedMetricPrefixFormat()
     * Long number = 5821L
     * String formattedNumber = formatter.format(number)
     * assert formattedNumber == '5.8k'
     *
     * Long parsedNumber = formatter.parseObject(formattedNumber)
     * assert parsedNumber == 5800
     * assert parsedNumber != number
     * }
     * </pre>
     *
     * @param source a number that may have a metric prefix
     * @param pos if parsing succeeds, this should be updated to the index after the last parsed character
     * @return a Number if the the string is a number without a metric prefix, or a Long if it has a metric prefix
     */
    @Override
    public Object parseObject(String source, ParsePosition pos) {

        if (NumberUtils.isNumber(source)) {

            // if the value is a number (without a prefix) don't return it as a Long or we'll lose any decimals
            pos.setIndex(source.length());
            return toNumber(source);

        } else if (METRIC_PREFIXED_NUMBER.matcher(source).matches()) {

            boolean isNegative = source.charAt(0) == '-';
            int length = source.length();

            String number = isNegative ? source.substring(1, length - 1) : source.substring(0, length - 1);
            String metricPrefix = Character.toString(source.charAt(length - 1));

            Number absoluteNumber = toNumber(number);

            int index = 0;

            for (; index < METRIC_PREFIXES.length; index++) {
                if (METRIC_PREFIXES[index].equals(metricPrefix)) {
                    break;
                }
            }

            Integer exponent = 3 * index;
            Double factor = Math.pow(10, exponent);
            factor *= isNegative ? -1 : 1;

            pos.setIndex(source.length());
            Float result = absoluteNumber.floatValue() * factor.longValue();
            return result.longValue();
        }

        return null;
    }

    private static Number toNumber(String number) {
        return NumberUtils.createNumber(number);
    }
}

Groovy Solution

The solution was originally written in Groovy as shown below.

import org.apache.commons.lang.math.NumberUtils

import java.text.DecimalFormat
import java.text.FieldPosition
import java.text.Format
import java.text.ParsePosition
import java.util.regex.Pattern


/**
 * Converts a number to a string in <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_prefix">metric prefix</a> format.
 * For example, 7800000 will be formatted as '7.8M'. Numbers under 1000 will be unchanged. Refer to the tests for further examples.
 */
class RoundedMetricPrefixFormat extends Format {

    private static final METRIC_PREFIXES = ["", "k", "M", "G", "T"]

    /**
     * The maximum number of characters in the output, excluding the negative sign
     */
    private static final Integer MAX_LENGTH = 4

    private static final Pattern TRAILING_DECIMAL_POINT = ~/[0-9]+\.[kMGT]/

    private static final Pattern METRIC_PREFIXED_NUMBER = ~/\-?[0-9]+(\.[0-9])?[kMGT]/

    @Override
    StringBuffer format(Object obj, StringBuffer output, FieldPosition pos) {

        Double number = obj as Double

        // if the number is negative, convert it to a positive number and add the minus sign to the output at the end
        boolean isNegative = number < 0
        number = Math.abs(number)

        String result = new DecimalFormat("##0E0").format(number)

        Integer index = Character.getNumericValue(result.charAt(result.size() - 1)) / 3
        result = result.replaceAll("E[0-9]", METRIC_PREFIXES[index])

        while (result.size() > MAX_LENGTH || TRAILING_DECIMAL_POINT.matcher(result).matches()) {
            int length = result.size()
            result = result.substring(0, length - 2) + result.substring(length - 1)
        }

        output << (isNegative ? "-$result" : result)
    }

    /**
     * Convert a String produced by <tt>format()</tt> back to a number. This will generally not restore
     * the original number because <tt>format()</tt> is a lossy operation, e.g.
     *
     * <pre>
     * {@code
     * def formatter = new RoundedMetricPrefixFormat()
     * Long number = 5821L
     * String formattedNumber = formatter.format(number)
     * assert formattedNumber == '5.8k'
     *
     * Long parsedNumber = formatter.parseObject(formattedNumber)
     * assert parsedNumber == 5800
     * assert parsedNumber != number
     * }
     * </pre>
     *
     * @param source a number that may have a metric prefix
     * @param pos if parsing succeeds, this should be updated to the index after the last parsed character
     * @return a Number if the the string is a number without a metric prefix, or a Long if it has a metric prefix
     */
    @Override
    Object parseObject(String source, ParsePosition pos) {

        if (source.isNumber()) {

            // if the value is a number (without a prefix) don't return it as a Long or we'll lose any decimals
            pos.index = source.size()
            toNumber(source)

        } else if (METRIC_PREFIXED_NUMBER.matcher(source).matches()) {

            boolean isNegative = source[0] == '-'

            String number = isNegative ? source[1..-2] : source[0..-2]
            String metricPrefix = source[-1]

            Number absoluteNumber = toNumber(number)

            Integer exponent = 3 * METRIC_PREFIXES.indexOf(metricPrefix)
            Long factor = 10 ** exponent
            factor *= isNegative ? -1 : 1

            pos.index = source.size()
            (absoluteNumber * factor) as Long
        }
    }

    private static Number toNumber(String number) {
        NumberUtils.createNumber(number)
    }
}

Tests (Groovy)

The tests are written in Groovy but can be used to verify either either the Java or Groovy class (because they both have the same name and API).

import java.text.Format
import java.text.ParseException

class RoundedMetricPrefixFormatTests extends GroovyTestCase {

    private Format roundedMetricPrefixFormat = new RoundedMetricPrefixFormat()

    void testNumberFormatting() {

        [
                7L         : '7',
                12L        : '12',
                856L       : '856',
                1000L      : '1k',
                (-1000L)   : '-1k',
                5821L      : '5.8k',
                10500L     : '10k',
                101800L    : '102k',
                2000000L   : '2M',
                7800000L   : '7.8M',
                (-7800000L): '-7.8M',
                92150000L  : '92M',
                123200000L : '123M',
                9999999L   : '10M',
                (-9999999L): '-10M'
        ].each { Long rawValue, String expectedRoundValue ->

            assertEquals expectedRoundValue, roundedMetricPrefixFormat.format(rawValue)
        }
    }

    void testStringParsingSuccess() {
        [
                '7'    : 7,
                '8.2'  : 8.2F,
                '856'  : 856,
                '-856' : -856,
                '1k'   : 1000,
                '5.8k' : 5800,
                '-5.8k': -5800,
                '10k'  : 10000,
                '102k' : 102000,
                '2M'   : 2000000,
                '7.8M' : 7800000L,
                '92M'  : 92000000L,
                '-92M' : -92000000L,
                '123M' : 123000000L,
                '10M'  : 10000000L

        ].each { String metricPrefixNumber, Number expectedValue ->

            def parsedNumber = roundedMetricPrefixFormat.parseObject(metricPrefixNumber)
            assertEquals expectedValue, parsedNumber
        }
    }

    void testStringParsingFail() {

        shouldFail(ParseException) {
            roundedMetricPrefixFormat.parseObject('notNumber')
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
//code longer but work sure...

public static String formatK(int number) {
    if (number < 999) {
        return String.valueOf(number);
    }

    if (number < 9999) {
        String strNumber = String.valueOf(number);
        String str1 = strNumber.substring(0, 1);
        String str2 = strNumber.substring(1, 2);
        if (str2.equals("0")) {
            return str1 + "k";
        } else {
            return str1 + "." + str2 + "k";
        }
    }

    if (number < 99999) {
        String strNumber = String.valueOf(number);
        String str1 = strNumber.substring(0, 2);
        return str1 + "k";
    }

    if (number < 999999) {
        String strNumber = String.valueOf(number);
        String str1 = strNumber.substring(0, 3);
        return str1 + "k";
    }

    if (number < 9999999) {
        String strNumber = String.valueOf(number);
        String str1 = strNumber.substring(0, 1);
        String str2 = strNumber.substring(1, 2);
        if (str2.equals("0")) {
            return str1 + "m";
        } else {
            return str1 + "." + str2 + "m";
        }
    }

    if (number < 99999999) {
        String strNumber = String.valueOf(number);
        String str1 = strNumber.substring(0, 2);
        return str1 + "m";
    }

    if (number < 999999999) {
        String strNumber = String.valueOf(number);
        String str1 = strNumber.substring(0, 3);
        return str1 + "m";
    }

    NumberFormat formatterHasDigi = new DecimalFormat("###,###,###");
    return formatterHasDigi.format(number);
}
share|improve this answer
    
this does not work for all of your edge cases. Try 999 for example. –  jzd Nov 4 '13 at 14:33

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