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If a process is interrupted by a hardware interrupt (First Level Interrupt Handler), then does the CPU scheduler becomes aware of that (e.g. Does the Scheduler count execution time for hardware interrupts separately from interrupted process)?

More details: I am trying to troubleshoot an issue where CPU utilization in htop is way too low for the specified packet encryption task (CPU is at <10% while encrypting packets at 400Mbps; Raw encryption speed is only 1.6Gbps, so packet encryption should not go any faster than raw encryption speed).

Explanation: My hypothesis is that packet encapsulation happens at hardware interrupts hence giving me the illusion of the low CPU usage in htop. Usually FLIHs are implemented so that they finish their task as quickly as possible and defer their work to SLIHs (Second Level Interrupt Handler which I guess is executed on behalf of ksoftirqd/X). But what happens if FLIH interrupts a process for a very long time? Does that introduce some kind of a OS jitter?

I am using Ubuntu 10.04.1 on x86-64 platform.

Additional debugging info:

while [ 1 ]; do cat /proc/stat | grep "cpu "; sleep 1; done;
cpu  288 1 1677 356408 1145 0 20863 0 0
cpu  288 1 1677 356772 1145 0 20899 0 0
cpu  288 1 1677 357108 1145 0 20968 0 0
cpu  288 1 1677 357392 1145 0 21083 0 0
cpu  288 1 1677 357620 1145 0 21259 0 0
cpu  288 1 1677 357972 1145 0 21310 0 0
cpu  288 1 1677 358289 1145 0 21398 0 0
cpu  288 1 1677 358517 1145 0 21525 0 0
cpu  288 1 1678 358838 1145 0 21652 0 0
cpu  289 1 1678 359141 1145 0 21704 0 0
cpu  289 1 1678 359563 1145 0 21729 0 0
cpu  290 1 1678 359886 1145 0 21758 0 0
cpu  290 1 1678 360296 1145 0 21801 0 0

Seventh (or sixth number column) column here I guess is the time spent inside Hardware interrupt handlers (htop uses this proc file to get statistics). I am wondering if this will end up as a bug in linux or the driver. When I took these /proc/stat snapshots the traffic was going at 500Mbps in and 500Mbps out.

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Is this a programming question? I can't quite tell? – Gabe Jan 21 '11 at 0:02
    
N.B. while [ 1 ]; is easier written as while :; – user562374 Jan 21 '11 at 9:04
    
Bur harder read – hirschhornsalz Jan 21 '11 at 9:27
1  
Can also be while true; do ... – Zan Lynx Nov 4 '11 at 22:46
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The time spent in interrupt handlers is accounted.

htop shows it in "si" (soft interrupt) and "hi" (hard interrupt). ni is nice and wa is io-wait.

Edit: From man proc:

sixth column is hardware irq time

seventh column is softirq

eight is stolen time

nienth is guest time.

the latter two are only meaningful for virtualized systems.

Do you have a kernel built with the CONFIG_IRQ_TIME_ACCOUNTING (Processor type and features/Fine granularity task level IRQ time accounting) option set?

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The raw encryption speed I have specified is in Bits, not Bytes and they are definitely correct (The CPU is Q6600 and cipher is aes-128). Is there a tool that shows hardware interrupts next to the processes? Powertop seemed to be one such tool but it does not tell me the time it spends inside a hardware interrupt handler but only the rate how often they fire. And %id in top is close to ~95% during packet encapsulation, so something is not accounted correctly... – Ansis Atteka Jan 21 '11 at 1:08
    
It seems that you have provided very close hint. I attached output of cat /proc/stat which was taken each second – Ansis Atteka Jan 21 '11 at 2:30
    
No I do not have CONFIG_IRQ_TIME_ACCOUNTING. Although I am using the Ubuntu server kernel. – Ansis Atteka Jan 21 '11 at 21:09

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