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so, I'm using the following class to create a table and I need to find a way to not only make it faster but make interactions with it faster

class Table(object):
    """a three dimensional table object"""
    def __init__(self, xsize=1, ysize=1, zsize=1):
        self.xsize = xsize
        self.ysize = ysize
        self.zsize = zsize
        self.data = [0] * (xsize * ysize * zsize)

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        x, y, z = self.__extractIndices(key)
        return self.data[x + self.xsize * (y + self.ysize * z)]

    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
        x, y, z = self.__extractIndices(key)
        self.data[x + self.xsize * (y + self.ysize * z)] = value

    def __extractIndices(self, key):
        x = y = z = 0
        if (self.ysize > 1):
            if (self.zsize > 1):
                if len(key) != 3:
                    raise IndexError
                else:
                    x, y, z = key
            elif len(key) != 2:
                raise IndexError
            else:
                x, y = key
        elif not isinstance(key, int):
            raise IndexError
        else:
            x = key
        return (x, y, z)

    def resize(self, xsize=1, ysize=1, zsize=1):
        """resize the table preserving data"""
        oldlist = list(self.data)
        self.data = [0] * (xsize * ysize * zsize)
        self.xsize = xsize
        self.ysize = ysize
        self.zsize = zsize
        for i in range(0, oldlist):
            self.data[1] = oldlist[i]

at on point I need to find if the data in two lists is equivalent of each of the z's so I did this. self.data and self.map.data are table class instances from above

    for x in range(self.map.width - 1):
        for y in range(self.map.height - 1):
            tempflag = False
            #layer 1
            if self.data[x, y, 0] != self.map.data[x, y, 0]:
                tempflag = True
                layer1flag = True
            #layer 2
            if self.data[x, y, 1] != self.map.data[x, y, 1]:
                tempflag = True
                layer2flag = True
            #layer 3
            if self.data[x, y, 2] != self.map.data[x, y, 2]:
                tempflag = True
                layer3flag = True
            #copy the data if it changed
            if tempflag:
                self.data = copy.deepcopy(self.map.data)
                previewflag = True

clearly this is the slowest way I could conceivably do this and considering that some of these tables I'm comparing have a size of 200 * 200 * 3 = 120,000 entries. I NEED this to be as fast as possible.

I've considered rewriting the above comparison to slice all the entries for one z like so

tempflag = False
#layer 1
slicepoint1 = 0
slicepoint2 = self.data.xsize * self.data.ysize * 1
data1 = self.data.data[slicepoint1:slicepoint2]
data2 = self.map.data.data[slicepoint1:slicepoint2]
if data1 != data2:
    tempflag = True
    layer1flag = True
#layer 2
slicepoint1 = self.data.xsize * self.data.ysize * 1
slicepoint2 = self.data.xsize * self.data.ysize * 2
data1 = self.data.data[slicepoint1:slicepoint2]
data2 = self.map.data.data[slicepoint1:slicepoint2]
if data1 != data2:
    tempflag = True
    layer2flag = True
#layer 3
slicepoint1 = self.data.xsize * self.data.ysize * 2
slicepoint2 = self.data.xsize * self.data.ysize * 3
data1 = self.data.data[slicepoint1:slicepoint2]
data2 = self.map.data.data[slicepoint1:slicepoint2]
if data1 != data2:
    tempflag = True
    layer3flag = True
#copy the data if it changed
if tempflag:
    self.data = copy.deepcopy(self.map.data)
    previewflag = True

and while this seems like it would go faster it still seems like it's could be significantly improved. for example could a not use numpy to build the data list inside the Table class?

I need this class and this check to run as fast as it possibly can

it would also be nice if the use of numpy would allow me to loop through the table really fast so I could use the data in it for blit operations to build a tilemap

I do need to keep the general interface of the table class particularly the fact that the table data is stored in self.data

in summary can the speed of the operations be increased by using numpy? is so how can I do it

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1  
That looks like a very slow and awkward way to store 3D data. Even using nested lists in Python is likely to be quicker and simpler, but a numpy array is probably an even better answer. –  Thomas K Jan 20 '11 at 23:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is definitely an application for NumPy! It will not only speed up your code, it will also simplify your code considerably, because indexing and comparison are already handled by NumPy. You will have to read some tutorial to learn NumPy -- just a few hints to get you going in this case.

Usually, I would simply derive from numpy.ndarray to define a custom array class, but you stated that you definitely need the data attribute, which clashes with numpy.ndarray.data. Your class simplifies to

class Table(object):
    def __init__(self, xsize=1, ysize=1, zsize=1):
        self.data = numpy.zeros((xsize, ysize, zsize))

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        return self.data[key]

    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
        self.data[key] = value

    def resize(self, xsize=1, ysize=1, zsize=1):
        # This only works for increasing the size of the data,
        # but is easy do adapt to other cases
        newdata = numpy.zeros((xsize, ysize, zsize))
        shape = self.data.shape
        newdata[:shape[0], :shape[1], :shape[2]] = self.data
        self.data = newdata

Your comparison code simplifies to

eq = self.data == self.data.map
layerflags = eq.reshape(-1, 3).any(axis=0)
if layerflags.any():
    self.data[:] = self.map.data

And it will be much faster too!

share|improve this answer
    
perhaps I'm missing something, how dose that comparison return an object on which reshape can be called? can you perhaps link me to the reference material that descries this operation? that would help me understand you answer better. thanks. I'm currently reading through the Numpy documentation so perhaps I'll find it before you can respond, If I do I'll edit this comment –  Ryex Jan 21 '11 at 0:42
    
@Ryex: All operations in NumPy are vectorised, i.e. performed element-wise. == on two arrays will return an array of bools, indicating which elements of the two arrays compare equal. –  Sven Marnach Jan 21 '11 at 0:58
    
now THAT is cool. as a quick side question is there a way to convert a list of the same format in my version of the table class to a numpy array where the [0,0,0] index operation would return the same value? and vise versa? these two operations would only need to be performed in an import and export method once in a great while so while speed would be perfered it would not really be needed here. –  Ryex Jan 21 '11 at 1:09
    
I tried a b = numpy.array(a.data) followed by b.shape = (a.xsize, a.ysize, a.zsize) but the result didn't return the right indexes –  Ryex Jan 21 '11 at 1:16
    
From list to array: numpy.array(some_list), other way around: some_array.tolist(). –  Sven Marnach Jan 21 '11 at 1:18

I think yes, by using numpy you can probably gain alot of speed.

Not only can you make slices but you can make rectangular, and probably cubic slices too, example:

>>> a = numpy.array([[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]])
>>> a[:2,1:]
array([[2, 3],
       [5, 6]])

I'm not sure what you want to accomplish but you can also easily compare numpy arrays elementwise:

>>> numpy.array([1,2,3])==numpy.array([9,2,3])
array([False,  True,  True], dtype=bool)

If you got more questions don't hesitate to comment.

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