Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Apache vs nginx vs lighttpd? Which is simpler to configure and administer?

A bit more context, in case this question is too general: the uses I have in mind are running Django and serving static content and name-based virtual hosting.

I am vaguely aware of the performance/resource tradeoffs between the different servers, but that is a secondary concern.

Does anyone have experience with all of them to discuss the tradeoffs?

share|improve this question
add comment

closed as not constructive by Chris, Jon B, Kevin Peno, ataylor, andrewsi Nov 28 '12 at 21:47

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

16 Answers

nginx get my vote by far. I've worked with all of them for years.

lighttpd is not an option right now, it's got major memory leak issues that have been outstanding for years, mark it off your list immediately.

The pros and cons of apache are well documented elsewhere, I'll let someone else address that.

nginx is very simple to configure, a dream for your static content task. I haven't run django behind nginx, but I've run 20 different servers with mongrels behind nginx, and it's really, really nice. Compared to apache, nginx is much less memory and cpu intensive, coupled with very simple config it's a simple decision in my book.

I would highly suggest you give it a shot before you sink the time into apache. It's possible that the python handling is better in apache, someone else can probably lend their experience.

share|improve this answer
7  
would you be able to provide a link to a summary of the apache pros and cons? –  rz. Jan 24 '09 at 4:35
24  
Or, a link to these nefarious memory leak issues with lighttpd that I always hear about but have never experienced. I run lighttpd with fastcgi, and have never had an issue. –  Evan Carroll Nov 22 '10 at 16:24
4  
I too would like a link to the memory leak on lighttpd... –  CVertex Feb 13 '11 at 11:18
6  
In the now two years since his answer, it's not impossible lighttpd has resolved the memory issues the answer refers to. –  Daniel Wright Feb 17 '11 at 19:14
6  
redmine.lighttpd.net/issues/758 -- According to the last update it's not a true leak, but I bet this is what most people have experienced. –  Steve S Mar 14 '11 at 16:22
show 2 more comments

I will not talk about apache... it is well known and documented. I'll talk about nginx vs lighttpd.

The second one (lighttpd) is much more feature rich, easier to configure and it has a way better documentation. When talking about deployment of FCGI or SCGI application (the API Django actually uses) there are several important points that lighttpd has:

  1. It provides support for spawning FCGI and SCGI applications on its own, meaning it can fork and manage it for you if you want. (For SCGI spawning use lighttpd >= 1.4.20). When it comes to nginx you must manage you fastcgi/SCGI application on your own -- use your own startup scripts.
  2. It provides support of both TCP/IP sockets and Unix domain sockets for both protocols. (AFAIK nginx and apache does not provide support of unix domain sockets for SCGI).
  3. It provides native support of CGI PATH_INFO variable. In nginx you should do a silly workarounds using regular expressions to provide PATH_INFO that is not supported.
  4. nginx does not support CGI spawning, meaning that if you have a simple task to do that can be easily done with CGI, it is impossible for nginx to handle it.
  5. Configuration of FCGI for lighttpd is way simpler -- about 4-5 lines.

So... Nginx is indeed nice web server, but it isn't my first choice.

That is my little experience with FCGI/SCGI development using various servers.

Update (2012-08-10):

Additionally I'd strongly recommend to use Lighttpd:

  • Also the PATH_INFO problem was fixed in nginx there are still too many issues with nginx and fastcgi, for example this ticket which actually means that you can't deploy streaming Comet methods behind fastcgi.
  • The development style of nginx is very patchy - if there is some problem (lets say a bug or missing feature reported fastcgi) it would not be ported to other modules like HTTP or SCGI and vise versa. Examples buffering, path-info configuration, path-info url decoding etc.

There are more.

In general nginx development is very patchy and documentation is inconsistent (frequently you can find in some pages stuff like: this module is based on module xyz, the documentation copied, there may be mistakes)

So please, give yourself a favor - use lighttpd.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I run Django on Apache behind Nginx, with Nginx handling the static content. I'm happy with the arrangement, but if you really value simplicity of configuration over performance, you'd probably be happiest using just Apache alone. Can't beat the simplicity of configuring one webserver rather than two. (Running Django on just Nginx using FastCGI is possible, but IMO that's more difficult to configure and less well supported; you have to manually start the FCGI processes yourself).

If you use mod_wsgi in daemon mode and Apache's worker MPM, and you're careful not to bloat Apache with lots of unneeded modules, you still gain a lot of the same memory usage benefits as with a frontend Nginx: the Python code bloat is limited to only a few WSGI daemon processes and your Apache worker threads can stay quite slim for serving static content.

share|improve this answer
9  
Running Django through FastCGI and nginx is quite easy. –  Ryan Duffield Jan 29 '09 at 21:55
8  
It still requires separate infrastructure to support your FastCGI processes and your webserver processes. If simplicity and ease of administration is the goal, I don't think it beats Apache/mod_wsgi. –  Carl Meyer Feb 2 '09 at 16:41
1  
+1 on answer and I completely agree with Carl's comment. –  Van Gale Feb 7 '09 at 0:17
    
+1 This is the setup that I favour, and I've no complaints so far. Config is super easy. –  Gary Chambers Jun 17 '09 at 11:08
3  
@resopollution see my comments about FastCGI etc. Apache+mod_wsgi is the officially-recommended, best-supported, and easiest method for hosting Django. That's why I don't run nginx alone. –  Carl Meyer Jul 10 '09 at 17:01
show 3 more comments

You might want to have a look at Cherokee if ease of configuration and high performance are your goals. You'll find it friendlier than lighttpd as far as configuration and about as, if not more, efficient than nginx and even hooks for some Apache compatibility (easy to port rewrites, etc).

I recently moved most of my lighttpd installations over to Cherokee with great success. I'm even using it as a front end load balancer, both for HTTP and MySQL. It's really a well written, very versatile and extremely friendly server.

share|improve this answer
2  
Cherokee is very nice to configure (for single servers; more difficult to automate), but was very unstable last time I checked. I wouldn't recommend it at all, except for playing around. Wait for 1.0 and test it heavily then. –  Lee B Jan 17 '10 at 10:57
1  
While Cherokee 1.0 is out ( lists.octality.com/pipermail/cherokee/2010-May/012737.html ), my question about stability guarantees ( lists.octality.com/pipermail/cherokee/2010-May/012743.html ) brought about a response ( lists.octality.com/pipermail/cherokee/2010-May/012760.html ) that Alvaro has no intention of using anything other than a single development branch, which is a bit unnerving as a sysadmin. –  Xiong Chiamiov Jul 14 '10 at 23:04
add comment

By far, lighttpd is the easiest to configure (as a matter of fact, I migrated from Apache to lighttpd due to configuration easiness/comfortableness).

Apache has far more options, and customizability, but, if you don't need that, stick with lighttpd. Most benchmarks out there give it about 50% better performance than Apache.

I've never used nginex, so I've no opinion on it in particular.

[EDIT]
This response is about 3 years old. I've used nginx for about 2 years now, and it's way easier to configure in most cases: unless you want to use PHP, in which case you'll have to read a short while about a few settings you need to tweak in nginx and php.
All in all, there's not too much difference between nginx and lighttpd as far a simplicity of configuration: they're basically in the same league.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I pretty much agree with all that Carl Meyer writes. Wonder how Stack Overflow handles "me too" responses? :-)

The original question doesn't give much specific information about the intended use - expected load / requests per second, hosting type, etc. Assuming that the load is small'ish, I would recommend using just Apache with mod-wsgi, or Apache with mod-wsgi and S3 for static file serving.

mod-wsgi recently became the recommended way to deploy Django, see http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/howto/deployment/modwsgi/ . Given this status, you should expect this method to see a lot of usage, and therefore a lot of documentation, tips'n'tricks and blog posts. Graham Dumpleton also recently release mod-wsgi 2.4 which looks quite mature (I haven't used it yet).

You can put nginx in front of Apache to proxy dynamic requests, and serve static files. This setup serves many people well. The nginx wiki has good tutorials on setting this up, http://wiki.nginx.org/Main . But this also gives you two sets of config files to learn, and two HTTP servers to keep updated.

Using only Apache, you could use Apache to serve static files, use mod-wsgi in deamon mode to handle Django. Then split up the requests by URL so that static file requests do not invoke the WSGI / Django stack, but are handled by Apache alone. This is again well documented, see your favorite Apache book for location handlers, or see the Apache / mod-wsgi docs. This at least 'centralizes' your learning, so that you only need to learn Apache & mod-wsgi configuration, and to keep Apache & mod-wsgi updated.

Another simple way to go would be to use Apache + mod-wsgi for all dynamic Django content, and put all static content on f.x. Amazon S3. Depending on your expected use / frequency of updating static content, this might be the very best. Amazon lists a couple of freeware applications to make working with S3 simple, such as S3Fox, Bucket Explorer etc.

HTH,

share|improve this answer
add comment

In reply to Carl Meyer's Jan 24 '09 answer,

(Running Django on just Nginx using FastCGI is possible, but IMO that's more difficult to configure and less well supported; you have to manually start the FCGI processes yourself).

There's a very handy init script on the Django site for managing multiple Django FCGI sites. You can start/stop/restart/status sites individually too.

share|improve this answer
add comment

One nginx feature I like a lot is the ability to reload its configuration on the fly without dropping any requests. lighttpd's solution for this (lighttpd-angel) will drop incoming requests on a busy system.

Comparing both nginx and lighttpd with Apache the biggest win I've found is the easy, per URL regex based configs which make complex configs with different settings for different directories (or file patterns) really easy to do.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Nginx and lighttpd are better for low-memory environments such as on a VPS. Apache is good if you want a wide range of configuration options. Since lighttpd is being "rewritten", I would go with nginx right now.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Simple, Cherokee + uwsgi is the perfect combo. I like Cherokee very much, it is fast and efficient. It has a clean code and also has a web based configuration Program called cherokee-admin. There is nothing that chould beat that. You don't need to write a config file yourself. I used to backup do yourself config files. But, cherokee-admin makes it too easy to give it up. It'd suggest you to read-up on Cherokee vs Everything else ( there are benchmarks btw ) or you could try both and let us know your results.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I really like the way how nginx behaves under heavy load. I've experienced myself that its predictable memory footprint feature (due to asynchronous request handling) saves you a lot of pain.

The only problem with nginx I have is that you don't have per-directory configuration file (eg. .htaccess), which is usable when you host diffrerent applications each with its own rewrite requirements.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Both lighttpd and nginx have similar memory footprint. Both serve well its purpose so it's a matter of personal taste - to me lighttpd configuration is easier to understand and maintain.

Apache has long been preferred solution but mod_python has some serious problems when it comes to more complicated configurations, for example running 2 Django apps with different LANGUAGE_CODE is impossible due to race condition in setting locale (you have to load separate interpreters or run separate apache instances, effectively making your apache to eat doubled amount of memory).

On the other hand, FastCGI processes are separated (and no, you do not need to start them separately, see runfcgi command of django-admin.py).

share|improve this answer
add comment

lihttpd has memory leaks, nginx is great as reverse proxy and for caching but is a little complex to configure it; cherokee is light and easy use, has a web administration interface with wizards for Django, Rails, WordPress... and many other plataforms...

share|improve this answer
add comment

I used Apache with mod_python and mod_wsgi for a while and then switched to nginx in combination with gunicorn. I found the latter to be way easier and more intuitive to configure as I mentioned in a blog post.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I will favor onto a nginx personally. But if it's not optimized properly it'll be like hell. But i would also have my view onto specs like having a SAS hard disk.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm running Django on nginx+wsgi module (Gentoo build from connectical-contrib overlay). It's a speed of lightning compared to Apache.

share|improve this answer
7  
But has unpredictable blocking behaviour in a multiprocess configuration, something which you would need to be careful of in a production environment. See 'blog.dscpl.com.au/2009/05/…;. Also, when you load up a fat Python web application and run with similar configuration, you wouldn't expect to seem much difference, as the underlying server isn't the bottleneck. Thus, you shouldn't rely on benchmarks from WSGI hello world applications as they are mostly meaningless. –  Graham Dumpleton Aug 22 '09 at 12:08
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.