Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to print out the string represenation of a double without losing precision using ToString() I get the following when I try formatting it as a string:

double i = 101535479557522.5; 
i.ToString(); //displays 101535479557523

How do I do this in C#?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

If you want it to be exactly the same you should use i.ToString("r") (the "r" is for round-trip). You can read about the different numeric formats on MSDN.

share|improve this answer
    
after i add mor numbers again it neglect the .5 !! –  kartal Jan 20 '11 at 23:49
    
That's another question entirely :) Answered by Jon's answer below... –  Porges Jan 24 '11 at 20:55

You're running into the limits of the precision of Double. From the docs:

Remember that a floating-point number can only approximate a decimal number, and that the precision of a floating-point number determines how accurately that number approximates a decimal number. By default, a Double value contains 15 decimal digits of precision, although a maximum of 17 digits is maintained internally.

If you want more precision - and particularly maintaining a decimal representation - you should look at using the decimal type instead.

share|improve this answer
    
failed again if we add 33845159852507.5 5 times the result will be 169225799262538 not 169225799262537.5 i think it is big problem –  kartal Jan 21 '11 at 0:10
    
@salamonti: This answer explains why you are seeing the results you are seeing. ALL programming languages have this “problem” — it’s an unfortunate limitation of reality that you can only have so much precision within a 64-bit value. –  Timwi Jan 21 '11 at 0:26
    
@salamonti: Exactly what Timwi said, basically. See csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/FloatingPoint.aspx for more information. –  Jon Skeet Jan 21 '11 at 6:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.