Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Answering to another question, I wrote the program below to compare different search methods in a sorted array. Basically I compared two implementations of Interpolation search and one of binary search. I compared performance by counting cycles spent (with the same set of data) by the different variants.

However I'm sure there is ways to optimize these functions to make them even faster. Does anyone have any ideas on how can I make this search function faster? A solution in C or C++ is acceptable, but I need it to process an array with 100000 elements.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <assert.h>

static __inline__ unsigned long long rdtsc(void)
{
  unsigned long long int x;
     __asm__ volatile (".byte 0x0f, 0x31" : "=A" (x));
     return x;
}

int interpolationSearch(int sortedArray[], int toFind, int len) {
    // Returns index of toFind in sortedArray, or -1 if not found
    int64_t low = 0;
    int64_t high = len - 1;
    int64_t mid;

    int l = sortedArray[low];
    int h = sortedArray[high];

    while (l <= toFind && h >= toFind) {
        mid = low + (int64_t)((int64_t)(high - low)*(int64_t)(toFind - l))/((int64_t)(h-l));

        int m = sortedArray[mid];

        if (m < toFind) {
            l = sortedArray[low = mid + 1];
        } else if (m > toFind) {
            h = sortedArray[high = mid - 1];
        } else {
            return mid;
        }
    }

    if (sortedArray[low] == toFind)
        return low;
    else
        return -1; // Not found
}

int interpolationSearch2(int sortedArray[], int toFind, int len) {
    // Returns index of toFind in sortedArray, or -1 if not found
    int low = 0;
    int high = len - 1;
    int mid;

    int l = sortedArray[low];
    int h = sortedArray[high];

    while (l <= toFind && h >= toFind) {
        mid = low + ((float)(high - low)*(float)(toFind - l))/(1+(float)(h-l));
        int m = sortedArray[mid];

        if (m < toFind) {
            l = sortedArray[low = mid + 1];
        } else if (m > toFind) {
            h = sortedArray[high = mid - 1];
        } else {
            return mid;
        }
    }

    if (sortedArray[low] == toFind)
        return low;
    else
        return -1; // Not found
}

int binarySearch(int sortedArray[], int toFind, int len) 
{
    // Returns index of toFind in sortedArray, or -1 if not found
    int low = 0;
    int high = len - 1;
    int mid;

    int l = sortedArray[low];
    int h = sortedArray[high];

    while (l <= toFind && h >= toFind) {
        mid = (low + high)/2;

        int m = sortedArray[mid];

        if (m < toFind) {
            l = sortedArray[low = mid + 1];
        } else if (m > toFind) {
            h = sortedArray[high = mid - 1];
        } else {
            return mid;
        }
    }

    if (sortedArray[low] == toFind)
        return low;
    else
        return -1; // Not found
}

int order(const void *p1, const void *p2) { return *(int*)p1-*(int*)p2; }

int main(void) {
    int i = 0, j = 0, size = 100000, trials = 10000;
    int searched[trials];
    srand(-time(0));
    for (j=0; j<trials; j++) { searched[j] = rand()%size; }

    while (size > 10){
        int arr[size];
        for (i=0; i<size; i++) { arr[i] = rand()%size; }
        qsort(arr,size,sizeof(int),order);

        unsigned long long totalcycles_bs = 0;
        unsigned long long totalcycles_is_64 = 0;
        unsigned long long totalcycles_is_float = 0;
        unsigned long long totalcycles_new = 0;
        int res_bs, res_is_64, res_is_float, res_new;
        for (j=0; j<trials; j++) {
            unsigned long long tmp, cycles = rdtsc();
            res_bs = binarySearch(arr,searched[j],size);
            tmp = rdtsc(); totalcycles_bs += tmp - cycles; cycles = tmp;

            res_is_64 = interpolationSearch(arr,searched[j],size);
            assert(res_is_64 == res_bs || arr[res_is_64] == searched[j]); 
            tmp = rdtsc(); totalcycles_is_64 += tmp - cycles; cycles = tmp;

            res_is_float = interpolationSearch2(arr,searched[j],size);
            assert(res_is_float == res_bs || arr[res_is_float] == searched[j]); 
            tmp = rdtsc(); totalcycles_is_float += tmp - cycles; cycles = tmp;
        }
        printf("----------------- size = %10d\n", size);
        printf("binary search          = %10llu\n", totalcycles_bs);
        printf("interpolation uint64_t = %10llu\n",  totalcycles_is_64);
        printf("interpolation float    = %10llu\n",  totalcycles_is_float);
        printf("new                    = %10llu\n",  totalcycles_new);
        printf("\n");
        size >>= 1;
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
@kriss: My rationale was "not a real question"! It's not solving a real problem, there's no fixed answer, it doesn't really help anyone. Hence my comment above "how does it compare to STL?" The point being, this problem (a fast binary search) has already been solved in the overwhelming majority of situations. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 21 '11 at 11:57
3  
@Oli Charlesworth: Questions like this are fun and informative. Learning how to make the code faster is the aim. And the question is written in C, where STL doesn't exist. –  Andrew Bainbridge Jan 21 '11 at 12:19
1  
Whether something has an answer is only part of the usefulness of the question being here on SO. There are clearly things to be learned here. Besides, the question is answerable. I have a faster implementation that I now can't post. –  Andrew Bainbridge Jan 21 '11 at 12:39
1  
@Andrew: I don't doubt that there's useful things to be learnt here, but it's more appropriate for community wiki. There's no definitive answer (not least because the definition of "fastest" depends on platform and other things), and it could easily degenerate into a pissing contest. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 21 '11 at 12:46
1  
I cast the final vote to reopen the question. I agree with Oli that this may be mostly an academic exercise, and when circumstances allow, you should use one of the standard sorts provided by a library of your choice. But that doesn't make it "not a real question". I also edited the question to remove the "Code Golf" aspects, and convert it into a strictly code-based optimization question. I don't see anyone else's rationale for closing that I find compelling. –  Cody Gray Jan 24 '11 at 4:56
show 17 more comments

7 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you have some control over the in-memory layout of the data, you might want to look at Judy arrays.

Or to put a simpler idea out there: a binary search always cuts the search space in half. An optimal cut point can be found with interpolation (the cut point should NOT be the place where the key is expected to be, but the point which minimizes the statistical expectation of the search space for the next step). This minimizes the number of steps but... not all steps have equal cost. Hierarchical memories allow executing a number of tests in the same time as a single test, if locality can be maintained. Since a binary search's first M steps only touch a maximum of 2**M unique elements, storing these together can yield a much better reduction of search space per-cacheline fetch (not per comparison), which is higher performance in the real world.

n-ary trees work on that basis, and then Judy arrays add a few less important optimizations.

Bottom line: even "Random Access Memory" (RAM) is faster when accessed sequentially than randomly. A search algorithm should use that fact to its advantage.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Benchmarked on Win32 Core2 Quad Q6600, gcc v4.3 msys. Compiling with g++ -O3, nothing fancy.

Observation - the asserts, timing and loop overhead is about 40%, so any gains listed below should be divided by 0.6 to get the actual improvement in the algorithms under test.

Simple answers:

  1. On my machine replacing the int64_t with int for "low", "high" and "mid" in interpolationSearch gives a 20% to 40% speed up. This is the fastest easy method I could find. It is taking about 150 cycles per look-up on my machine (for the array size of 100000). That's roughly the same number of cycles as a cache miss. So in real applications, looking after your cache is probably going to be the biggest factor.

  2. Replacing binarySearch's "/2" with a ">>1" gives a 4% speed up.

  3. Using STL's binary_search algorithm, on a vector containing the same data as "arr", is about the same speed as the hand coded binarySearch. Although on the smaller "size"s STL is much slower - around 40%.

share|improve this answer
    
nice stats , kindly point me to the tool etc you used for bench marking.I am totally new to this field. –  Anupam Saini Jul 8 '11 at 10:08
    
I didn't use any tool, just the compiler. The original poster's program already timed itself. I just ran it many times with various modifications. I seem to remember that I changed exactly what was timed as well, but I've forgotten the details. –  Andrew Bainbridge Jul 8 '11 at 13:52
    
ahh .. In that case will modify the program itself.Thanks for the help Andrew –  Anupam Saini Jul 12 '11 at 5:30
    
+1 for benchmarking it and taking the time to post your results. –  Shane MacLaughlin May 24 '13 at 7:25
add comment

Unless your data is known to have special properties, pure interpolation search has the risk of taking linear time. If you expect interpolation to help with most data but don't want it to hurt in the case of pathological data, I would use a (possibly weighted) average of the interpolated guess and the midpoint, ensuring a logarithmic bound on the run time.

share|improve this answer
    
@R..: in that case I'm just curious in actual case I encounter a binary search is usually more than good enough for me. The data set tested here is pseudo-random as you can see and I'm not really worried about seeing interpolation degenerating, but maybe comparing interpolated point and midpoint could give a way to choose to continue next steps using binary search only. –  kriss Jan 21 '11 at 0:17
    
As a real-world example of interpolation degenerating, one application for search is seek-to-timestamp in unindexed video files. For any video where the typical bitrate is low but the peak bitrate is very high, interpolation-based search can lead to pathologically many seek-to-byte operations on the underlying file (or worse yet, network stream). –  R.. Jan 21 '11 at 0:41
    
I think it's easier to use a similar approach to that of introsort to ensure logartihmic run time bounds for degenerate cases, that is count the number of iterations done so far and if it takes too many iterations (defined as some multiple of the logarithm) to find the correct position switch to binary search. I think that might have a smaller impact on performance then generally modifying the search position for non degenerate cases (assuming the if to switch to binary gets correctly predicated, which should be the case). Of course this prediction is purely theoretical... –  Grizzly Jan 21 '11 at 2:16
    
I think you fail to understand how easy the hybrid algorithm is. In your interpolation version after the line mid = ..., just add mid = (2*mid + low + hi)/4; –  R.. Jan 21 '11 at 4:14
    
@R..: I tried hybrid version. On my testset it's slower than both interpolation search and binary search on nearly every cases, including degenerating ones (it happens with random data). However I should probably prepare a worst-case testset to see how it really performs. –  kriss Jan 21 '11 at 8:34
show 1 more comment

I have an excessively complicated solution, which requires a specialized sorting function. The sort is slightly slower than a good quicksort, but all of my tests show that the search function is much faster than a binary or interpolation search. I called it a regression sort before I found out that the name was already taken, but didn't bother to think of a new name (ideas?).

There are three files to demonstrate.

The regression sort/search code:

#include <sstream>
#include <math.h>
#include <ctime>
#include "limits.h"

void insertionSort(int array[], int length) {
   int key, j;
   for(int i = 1; i < length; i++) {
      key = array[i];
      j = i - 1;
      while (j >= 0 && array[j] > key) {
         array[j + 1] = array[j];
         --j;
      }
      array[j + 1] = key;
   }
}

class RegressionTable {
   public:
      RegressionTable(int arr[], int s, int lower, int upper, double mult, int divs);
      RegressionTable(int arr[], int s);
      void sort(void);
      int find(int key);
      void printTable(void);
      void showSize(void);
   private:
      void createTable(void);
      inline unsigned int resolve(int n);
      int * array;
      int * table;
      int * tableSize;
      int size;
      int lowerBound;
      int upperBound;
      int divisions;
      int divisionSize;
      int newSize;
      double multiplier;
};

RegressionTable::RegressionTable(int arr[], int s) {
   array = arr;
   size = s;
   multiplier = 1.35;
   divisions = sqrt(size);
   upperBound = INT_MIN;
   lowerBound = INT_MAX;
   for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
      if (array[i] > upperBound)
         upperBound = array[i];
      if (array[i] < lowerBound)
         lowerBound = array[i];
   }
   createTable();
}

RegressionTable::RegressionTable(int arr[], int s, int lower, int upper, double mult, int divs) {
   array = arr;
   size = s;
   lowerBound = lower;
   upperBound = upper;
   multiplier = mult;
   divisions = divs;
   createTable();
}

void RegressionTable::showSize(void) {
   int bytes = sizeof(*this);
   bytes = bytes + sizeof(int) * 2 * (divisions + 1);
}

void RegressionTable::createTable(void) {
   divisionSize = size / divisions;
   newSize = multiplier * double(size);
   table = new int[divisions + 1];
   tableSize = new int[divisions + 1];

   for (int i = 0; i < divisions; ++i) {
      table[i] = 0;
      tableSize[i] = 0;
   }

   for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
      ++table[((array[i] - lowerBound) / divisionSize) + 1];
   }

   for (int i = 1; i <= divisions; ++i) {
      table[i] += table[i - 1];
   }
   table[0] = 0;

   for (int i = 0; i < divisions; ++i) {
      tableSize[i] = table[i + 1] - table[i];
   }
}

int RegressionTable::find(int key) {
   double temp = multiplier;
   multiplier = 1;

   int minIndex = table[(key - lowerBound) / divisionSize];
   int maxIndex = minIndex + tableSize[key / divisionSize];
   int guess = resolve(key);
   double t;
   while (array[guess] != key) {
      // uncomment this line if you want to see where it is searching.
      //cout << "Regression Guessing " << guess << ", not there." << endl;
      if (array[guess] < key) {
         minIndex = guess + 1;
      }
      if (array[guess] > key) {
         maxIndex = guess - 1;
      }
      if (array[minIndex] > key || array[maxIndex] < key) {
         return -1;
      }
      t = ((double)key - array[minIndex]) / ((double)array[maxIndex] - array[minIndex]);
      guess = minIndex + t * (maxIndex - minIndex);
   }

   multiplier = temp;

   return guess;
}

inline unsigned int RegressionTable::resolve(int n) {
   float temp;
   int subDomain = (n - lowerBound) / divisionSize;
   temp = n % divisionSize;
   temp /= divisionSize;
   temp *= tableSize[subDomain];
   temp += table[subDomain];
   temp *= multiplier;
   return (unsigned int)temp;
}

void RegressionTable::sort(void) {
   int * out = new int[int(size * multiplier)];
   bool * used = new bool[int(size * multiplier)];
   int higher, lower;
   bool placed;

   for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {

      /* Figure out where to put the darn thing */
      higher = resolve(array[i]);
      lower = higher - 1;

      if (higher > newSize) {
         higher = size;
         lower = size - 1;
      } else if (lower < 0) {
         higher = 0;
         lower = 0;
      }
      placed = false;
      while (!placed) {
         if (higher < size && !used[higher]) {
            out[higher] = array[i];
            used[higher] = true;
            placed = true;
         } else if (lower >= 0 && !used[lower]) {
            out[lower] = array[i];
            used[lower] = true;
            placed = true;
         }
         --lower;
         ++higher;
      }
   }
   int index = 0;
   for (int i = 0; i < size * multiplier; ++i) {
      if (used[i]) {
         array[index] = out[i];
         ++index;
      }
   }

   insertionSort(array, size);
}

And then there is the regular search functions:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int binarySearch(int array[], int start, int end, int key) {
   // Determine the search point.
   int searchPos = (start + end) / 2;
   // If we crossed over our bounds or met in the middle, then it is not here.
   if (start >= end)
      return -1;
   // Search the bottom half of the array if the query is smaller.
   if (array[searchPos] > key)
      return binarySearch (array, start, searchPos - 1, key);
   // Search the top half of the array if the query is larger.
   if (array[searchPos] < key)
      return binarySearch (array, searchPos + 1, end, key);
   // If we found it then we are done.
   if (array[searchPos] == key)
      return searchPos;
}

int binarySearch(int array[], int size, int key) {
   return binarySearch(array, 0, size - 1, key);
}

int interpolationSearch(int array[], int size, int key) {
   int guess = 0;
   double t;
   int minIndex = 0;
   int maxIndex = size - 1;
   while (array[guess] != key) {

      t = ((double)key - array[minIndex]) / ((double)array[maxIndex] - array[minIndex]);
      guess = minIndex + t * (maxIndex - minIndex);

      if (array[guess] < key) {
         minIndex = guess + 1;
      }
      if (array[guess] > key) {
         maxIndex = guess - 1;
      }
      if (array[minIndex] > key || array[maxIndex] < key) {
         return -1;
      }
   }

   return guess;
}

And then I wrote a simple main to test out the different sorts.

    #include <iostream>
    #include <iomanip>
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <ctime>
    #include "regression.h"
    #include "search.h"
    using namespace std;

    void randomizeArray(int array[], int size) {
       for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
          array[i] = rand() % size;
       }
    }

    int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {

       int size = 100000;
       string arg;
       if (argc > 1) {
          arg = argv[1];
          size = atoi(arg.c_str());
       }
       srand(time(NULL));
       int * array;
       cout << "Creating Array Of Size " << size << "...\n";
       array = new int[size];

       randomizeArray(array, size);
       cout << "Sorting Array...\n";
       RegressionTable t(array, size, 0, size*2.5, 1.5, size);
       //RegressionTable t(array, size);
       t.sort();
       int trials = 10000000;
       int start;

       cout << "Binary Search...\n";
       start = clock();
       for (int i = 0; i < trials; ++i) {
          binarySearch(array, size, i % size);
       }
       cout << clock() - start << endl;

       cout << "Interpolation Search...\n";
       start = clock();
       for (int i = 0; i < trials; ++i) {
          interpolationSearch(array, size, i % size);
       }
       cout << clock() - start << endl;

       cout << "Regression Search...\n";
       start = clock();
       for (int i = 0; i < trials; ++i) {
          t.find(i % size);
       }
       cout << clock() - start << endl;

       return 0;
}

Give it a try and tell me if it's faster for you. It's super complicated, so it's really easy to break it if you don't know what you are doing. Be careful about modifying it.

I compiled the main with g++ on ubuntu.

share|improve this answer
    
It looks interesting. I will test it tonight. But to makes things clear the test run is done on an already sorted array, hence the sort performance will not be included in the test, just the interpolation function one. –  kriss Jan 21 '11 at 9:51
    
I tryied it and it is 2 times faster than interpolation. Yet I will have to look at details to understand if it really is an answer (if it is I could also accept set or hash table implementations for which find will also be faster). +1 anyway. –  kriss Jan 24 '11 at 6:31
add comment

One way of approaching this is to use a space versus time trade-off. There are any number of ways that could be done. The extreme way would be to simply make an array with the max size being the max value of the sorted array. Initialize each position with the index into sortedArray. Then the search would simply be O(1).

The following version, however, might be a little more realistic and possibly be useful in the real world. It uses a "helper" structure that is initialized on the first call. It maps the search space down to a smaller space by dividing by a number that I pulled out of the air without much testing. It stores the index of the lower bound for a group of values in sortedArray into the helper map. The actual search divides the toFind number by the chosen divisor and extracts the narrowed bounds of sortedArray for a normal binary search.

For example, if the sorted values range from 1 to 1000 and the divisor is 100, then the lookup array might contain 10 "sections". To search for value 250, it would divide it by 100 to yield integer index position 250/100=2. map[2] would contain the sortedArray index for values 200 and larger. map[3] would have the index position of values 300 and larger thus providing a smaller bounding position for a normal binary search. The rest of the function is then an exact copy of your binary search function.

The initialization of the helper map might be more efficient by using a binary search to fill in the positions rather than a simple scan, but it is a one time cost so I didn't bother testing that. This mechanism works well for the given test numbers which are evenly distributed. As written, it would not be as good if the distribution was not even. I think this method could be used with floating point search values too. However, extrapolating it to generic search keys might be harder. For example, I am unsure what the method would be for character data keys. It would need some kind of O(1) lookup/hash that mapped to a specific array position to find the index bounds. It's unclear to me at the moment what that function would be or if it exists.

I kludged the setup of the helper map in the following implementation pretty quickly. It is not pretty and I'm not 100% sure it is correct in all cases but it does show the idea. I ran it with a debug test to compare the results against your existing binarySearch function to be somewhat sure it works correctly.

The following are example numbers:

100000 * 10000 : cycles binary search          = 10197811
100000 * 10000 : cycles interpolation uint64_t = 9007939
100000 * 10000 : cycles interpolation float    = 8386879
100000 * 10000 : cycles binary w/helper        = 6462534

Here is the quick-and-dirty implementation:

#define REDUCTION 100  // pulled out of the air
typedef struct {
    int init;  // have we initialized it?
    int numSections;
    int *map;
    int divisor;
} binhelp;

int binarySearchHelp( binhelp *phelp, int sortedArray[], int toFind, int len)
{
    // Returns index of toFind in sortedArray, or -1 if not found
    int low;
    int high;
    int mid;

    if ( !phelp->init && len > REDUCTION ) {
        int i;
        int numSections = len / REDUCTION;
        int divisor = (( sortedArray[len-1] - 1 ) / numSections ) + 1;
        int threshold;
        int arrayPos;

        phelp->init = 1;
        phelp->divisor = divisor;
        phelp->numSections = numSections;
        phelp->map = (int*)malloc((numSections+2) * sizeof(int));
        phelp->map[0] = 0;
        phelp->map[numSections+1] = len-1;
        arrayPos = 0;
        // Scan through the array and set up the mapping positions.  Simple linear
        // scan but it is a one-time cost.
        for ( i = 1; i <= numSections; i++ ) {
            threshold = i * divisor;
            while ( arrayPos < len && sortedArray[arrayPos] < threshold )
                arrayPos++;
            if ( arrayPos < len )
                phelp->map[i] = arrayPos;
            else
                // kludge to take care of aliasing
                phelp->map[i] = len - 1;
        }
    }

    if ( phelp->init ) {
        int section = toFind / phelp->divisor;
        if ( section > phelp->numSections )
            // it is bigger than all values
            return -1;

        low = phelp->map[section];
        if ( section == phelp->numSections )
            high = len - 1;
        else
            high = phelp->map[section+1];
    } else {
        // use normal start points
        low = 0;
        high = len - 1;
    }

    // the following is a direct copy of the Kriss' binarySearch
    int l = sortedArray[low];
    int h = sortedArray[high];

    while (l <= toFind && h >= toFind) {
        mid = (low + high)/2;

        int m = sortedArray[mid];

        if (m < toFind) {
            l = sortedArray[low = mid + 1];
        } else if (m > toFind) {
            h = sortedArray[high = mid - 1];
        } else {
            return mid;
        }
    }

    if (sortedArray[low] == toFind)
        return low;
    else
        return -1; // Not found
}

The helper structure needs to be initialized (and memory freed):

    help.init = 0;
    unsigned long long totalcycles4 = 0;
    ... make the calls same as for the other ones but pass the structure ...
        binarySearchHelp(&help, arr,searched[j],length);
    if ( help.init )
        free( help.map );
    help.init = 0;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Posting my current version before the question is closed (hopefully I will thus be able to ehance it later). For now it is worse than every other versions (if someone understand why my changes to the end of loop has this effect, comments are welcome).

int newSearch(int sortedArray[], int toFind, int len) 
{
    // Returns index of toFind in sortedArray, or -1 if not found
    int low = 0;
    int high = len - 1;
    int mid;

    int l = sortedArray[low];
    int h = sortedArray[high];

    while (l < toFind && h > toFind) {
        mid = low + ((float)(high - low)*(float)(toFind - l))/(1+(float)(h-l));

        int m = sortedArray[mid];

        if (m < toFind) {
            l = sortedArray[low = mid + 1];
        } else if (m > toFind) {
            h = sortedArray[high = mid - 1];
        } else {
            return mid;
        }
    }

    if (l == toFind)
        return low;
    else if (h == toFind)
        return high;
    else
        return -1; // Not found
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Look first at the data and whether a big gain can be got by data specific method over a general method.

For large static sorted datasets, you can create an additional index to provide partial pigeon holing, based on the amount of memory you're willing to use. e.g. say we create a 256x256 two dimensional array of ranges, which we populate with the start and end positions in the search array of elements with corresponding high order bytes. When we come to search, we then use the high order bytes on the key to find the range / subset of the array we need to search. If we did have ~ 20 comparisons on our binary search of 100,000 elements O(log2(n)) we're now down to ~4 comarisons for 16 elements, or O(log2 (n/15)). The memory cost here is about 512k

Another method, again suited to data that doesn't change much, is to divide the data into arrays of commonly sought items and rarely sought items. For example, if you leave your existing search in place running a wide number of real world cases over a protracted testing period, and log the details of the item being sought, you may well find that the distribution is very uneven, i.e. some values are sought far more regularly than others. If this is the case, break your array into a much smaller array of commonly sought values and a larger remaining array, and search the smaller array first. If the data is right (big if!), you can often achieve broadly similar improvements to the first solution without the memory cost.

There are many other data specific optimizations which score far better than trying to improve on tried, tested and far more widely used general solutions.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.