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#include <iostream>
class Car
{
private:
  Car(){};
  int _no;
public:
  Car(int no)
  {
    _no=no;
  }
  void printNo()
  {
    std::cout<<_no<<std::endl;
  }
};
void printCarNumbers(Car *cars, int length)
{
    for(int i = 0; i<length;i++)
         std::cout<<cars[i].printNo();
}

int main()
{
  int userInput = 10;
  Car *mycars = new Car[userInput];
  for(int i =0;i < userInput;i++)
         mycars[i]=new Car[i+1];
  printCarNumbers(mycars,userInput);
  return 0;
}    

I want to create a car array but I get the following error:

cartest.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
cartest.cpp:5: error: ‘Car::Car()’ is private
cartest.cpp:21: error: within this context

is there a way to make this initialization without making Car() constructor public?

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9 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Nope.

But lo! If you use std::vector<Car>, like you should be (never ever use new[]), then you can specify exactly how elements should be constructed*.

*Well sort of. You can specify the value of which to make copies of.


Like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

class Car
{
private:
    Car(); // if you don't use it, you can just declare it to make it private
    int _no;
public:
    Car(int no) :
    _no(no)
    {
        // use an initialization list to initialize members,
        // not the constructor body to assign them
    }

    void printNo()
    {
        // use whitespace, itmakesthingseasiertoread
        std::cout << _no << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    int userInput = 10;

    // first method: userInput copies of Car(5)
    std::vector<Car> mycars(userInput, Car(5)); 

    // second method:
    std::vector<Car> mycars; // empty
    mycars.reserve(userInput); // optional: reserve the memory upfront

    for (int i = 0; i < userInput; ++i)
        mycars.push_back(Car(i)); // ith element is a copy of this

    // return 0 is implicit on main's with no return statement,
    // useful for snippets and short code samples
} 

With the additional function:

void printCarNumbers(Car *cars, int length)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < length; i++) // whitespace! :)
         std::cout << cars[i].printNo();
}

int main()
{
    // ...

    printCarNumbers(&mycars[0], mycars.size());
} 

Note printCarNumbers really should be designed differently, to accept two iterators denoting a range.

share|improve this answer
    
This actually does what I need but using vector is not an option. It must be Car because I have another method that takes *Car not std::vector<Car> –  Dan Paradox Jan 21 '11 at 2:23
2  
@Dan: You can use &mycars[0] to get a pointer to the underlying array. Though that's generally only useful for passing it to legacy code that doesn't use std::vector, you should update that requirement if you can. –  GManNickG Jan 21 '11 at 2:24
    
Low level API's often take a buffer and sometimes they need to be large (for example, transferring data from a frame grabber). Sometimes you can't avoid it, but you're right in the vast majority of cases +1 –  Ed S. Jan 21 '11 at 2:28
    
@Ed: Indeed. My guess is the requirement can change though, because I doubt the API really needs Car*. Maybe void*, though, and it was just loosely said. :) –  GManNickG Jan 21 '11 at 2:30
    
@Gman @Ed The options are too bad. I have to either make Car() public or change the input parameter just to define an array of pointers –  Dan Paradox Jan 21 '11 at 2:45
show 7 more comments

You can use placement-new like this:

class Car {
    int _no;
public:
    Car( int no ) :_no( no ) {
    }
};

int main() {
    void* raw_memory = operator new[]( NUM_CARS * sizeof( Car ) );
    Car* ptr = static_cast<Car*>( raw_memory );
    for( int i = 0; i < NUM_CARS; ++i ) {
        new( &ptr[i] )Car( i );
    }
    // destruct in inverse order    
    for( int i = NUM_CARS - 1; i >= 0; --i ) {
        ptr[i].~Car();
    }
    operator delete[]( raw_memory );
    return 0;
}

Reference from More Effective C++ - Scott Meyers:
Item 4 - Avoid gratuitous default constructors

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Why you destruct in inverse order? –  miniBill Jun 17 '12 at 18:57
    
@miniBill: Because it was constructed in forward order. The last thing constructed should be the first thing destructed. –  Thomas Eding Jun 26 '12 at 19:41
    
@ThomasEding - the rule of thumb is needed to ensure the correct order of destruction for objects that are dependent on each other. In this particular case those objects have no dependencies so they can be destructed in the forward order which should be a little faster and cache friendly. Reverse iteration is usually very poor in terms of performance compared to forward iteration. –  ddriver Jun 28 '13 at 15:56
    
How can you make this solution exception safe? I.e., what if a constructor of Car throws an exception for some i? I suppose one has to catch the exception, deconstruct all already constructed Car's in reverse order and rethrow... –  ingomueller.net Feb 21 at 10:26
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You can create an array of pointers.

Car** mycars = new Car*[userInput];
for (int i=0; i<userInput; i++){
    mycars[i] = new Car(...);
}

...

for (int i=0; i<userInput; i++){
    delete mycars[i];
}
delete [] mycars;

or

Car() constructor does not need to be public. Add a static method to your class that builds an array:

static Car* makeArray(int length){
    return new Car[length];
}
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This tends to be cleaner than the placement new option, BUT how about code that wants a Car * ? –  miniBill Jun 17 '12 at 18:51
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No, there isn't. New-expression only allows default initialization or no initialization at all.

The workaround would be to allocate raw memory buffer using operator new[] and then construct objects in that buffer using placement-new with non-default constructor.

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2  
Of course, we would use std::vector, which does this. But +1 for correctness. –  GManNickG Jan 21 '11 at 2:20
    
How do I allocate raw memory with operator new[] ? Any link that explains that? –  Dan Paradox Jan 21 '11 at 2:27
    
@Dan Paradox: There's an example in Chan's answer. –  AndreyT Jan 21 '11 at 16:28
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One way to solve is to give a static factory method to allocate the array if for some reason you want to give constructor private.

static Car*  Car::CreateCarArray(int dimensions)

But why are you keeping one constructor public and other private?

But anyhow one more way is to declare the public constructor with default value

#define DEFAULT_CAR_INIT 0
Car::Car(int _no=DEFAULT_CAR_INIT);
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I made it Car() private because I want to avoid the copy constructor –  Dan Paradox Jan 21 '11 at 2:20
1  
@Dan: But that's not a copy constructor. –  GManNickG Jan 21 '11 at 2:20
    
@GMan you are right but I want to avoid default constructor anyway. All cars must have an id –  Dan Paradox Jan 21 '11 at 2:32
    
@Dan, In that case you can use the factory method with dimenions and initialization list. The factory method would be responsible for creating and array and initializing the id for each object. Initialization function can also be private. –  Neera Jan 21 '11 at 2:55
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Good question. I had the same question, and found it here. The real answer is, @Dan-Paradox, there is no standard syntactical way of doing it. So, all these answers are a variety of alternatives to get around the problem.

I read the answers myself, and didn't particularly find any of them perfect for my personal convention. The method that I'll probably stick with is using a default constructor and a set method:

class MyClass
{
  int x,y,z;
public:
  MyClass(): x(0), y(0), z(0) {}
  MyClass(int _x,int _y,int _z): x(_x), y(_y), z(_z) {} // for single declarations
  void set(int _x,int _y,int _z)
  {
    x=_x;
    y=_y;
    z=_z;
  }
};

The standard initialization constructor is still there, so I can still initialize it normally if I don't need more than one, but if otherwise, I have a set method which sets all the variables that are initialized in the constructor. Thus I could do something like this:

int len=25;
MyClass list = new MyClass[len];
for(int i = 0; i < len; i++)
  list[i].set(1,2,3);

This works fine and flows naturally, without making code look confusing.


Now that's my answer for those wondering how to declare an array of objects that need to be initialized.

For you specifically, you're trying to give an array of cars identities, which I'd suppose you want to always be unique. You could do it with my method I explained above, and then in the for loop use i+1 as the argument sent to the set method - but from what I've read in your comments, it seems like you want the ids more internally initiated, so that by default each Car has a unique id, even if someone else uses your class Car.

If this is what you want, you can use a static member:

class Car
{
  static int current_id;
  int id;
public:
  Car(): id(current_id++) {}

  int getId() { return id; }
};
int Car::current_id = 1;

...

int cars=10;
Car* carlist = new Car[cars];

for(int i = 0; i < cars; i++)
  cout<<carlist[i].getId()<<" "; // prints "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10"

In this way, you don't have to worry at all about initiating the identities since they are managed internally.

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I don't think there's type-safe method that can do what you want.

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Not sure why you would do this, but you can do it with malloc.

Car *c = (Car*) malloc(sizeof(Car) *userInput);
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This is very close to what I need but I don't want to use new[] and malloc() together at the same source –  Dan Paradox Jan 21 '11 at 2:18
1  
yeah, I'm not convinced you want to do this. Can you tell us what you are trying to do? New always calls the constructor. That's kind of the point. –  madmik3 Jan 21 '11 at 2:20
    
oh, you can make your own new buffer too. Car* c= (Car*) (new char[sizeof(Car)]); –  madmik3 Jan 21 '11 at 2:23
    
@madmilk3 I don't think this will help. –  Dan Paradox Jan 21 '11 at 2:35
2  
@madmik3: re new char[] - yes, Dan could, but it's worth pointing out that he must then use delete[] (char*)c to deallocate it safely, and even then he's got to handle the inplace construction and destruction of each object. Anyone who needs to ask these questions isn't likely to do it properly + it's totally ugly. –  Tony D Jan 21 '11 at 2:37
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You can use in-place operator new. This would be a bit horrible, and I'd recommend keeping in a factory.

Car* createCars(unsigned number)
{
    if (number == 0 )
        return 0;
    Car* cars = reinterpret_cast<Car*>(new char[sizeof(Car)* number]);
    for(unsigned carId = 0;
        carId != number;
        ++carId)
    {
        new(cars+carId) Car(carId);
    }
    return cars;
}

And define a corresponding destroy so as to match the new used in this.

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