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I've seen a suggested coding standard that reads Never use goto unless in a switch statement fall-through.

I don't follow. What exactly would this 'exception' case look like, that justifies a goto?

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2  
I won't use it even in a switch statement fall-through. –  Danny Chen Jan 21 '11 at 6:40
5  
Read the first 3 words then goto end –  Greg Sansom Jan 21 '11 at 6:40
3  
The only reason I don't use it myself is because of other people who automatically get upset whenever you mention it. I get sick very quickly of over-sensitive people (comes from being an engineer, I guess). –  Zooba Jan 21 '11 at 6:47
2  
@The Smartest: A switch statement in itself can already have plenty of goto s, but they are named differently: Each break is a goto. –  chiccodoro Jan 21 '11 at 6:51
1  
@chiccodoro That's nothing, actually each case is a label and switch essentially is a goto. Each break is a goto, but also each continue is a goto too. –  Spook May 26 '14 at 20:10

6 Answers 6

up vote 37 down vote accepted

This construct is illegal in C#:

switch (variable) {
   case 2: 
       Console.WriteLine("variable is >= 2");
   case 1:
       Console.WriteLine("variable is >= 1");
}

In C++, it would run both lines if variable = 2. It may be intentional but it's too easy to forget break; at the end of the first case label. For this reason, they have made it illegal in C#. To mimic the fall through behavior, you will have to explicitly use goto to express your intention:

switch (variable) {
   case 2: 
       Console.WriteLine("variable is >= 2");
       goto case 1;
   case 1:
       Console.WriteLine("variable is >= 1");
       break;
}

That said, there are a few cases where goto is actually a good solution for the problem. Never shut down your brain with "never use something" rules. If it were 100% useless, it wouldn't have existed in the language in the first place. Don't use goto is a guideline; it's not a law.

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@Mehrdad: I would love to read "Never shut down your brain" but I think Im kinda late for it.. It seems it has been removed. Is that possible to refresh the link if you have any other reference link by chance? Thanks –  curiousBoy Sep 10 '14 at 19:02
1  
@curiousBoy Unfortunately, I do not recall what it was after more than 3 years and I do not have enough rep on access programmers.stackexchange to see it (I suspect it used to be a Stack Overflow post I linked to). –  Mehrdad Afshari Sep 10 '14 at 22:16

C# refuses to let cases fall through implicitly (unless there is no code in the case) as in C++: you need to include break. To explicitly fall through (or to jump to any other case) you can use goto case. Since there is no other way to obtain this behaviour, most (sensible) coding standards will allow it.

switch(variable)
{
case 1:
case 2:
    // do something for 1 and 2
    goto case 3;
case 3:
case 4:
    // do something for 1, 2, 3 and 4
    break;
}

A realistic example (by request):

switch(typeOfPathName)
{
case "relative":
    pathName = Path.Combine(currentPath, pathName);
    goto case "absolute";

case "expand":
    pathName = Environment.ExpandEnvironmentVariables(pathName);
    goto case "absolute";

case "absolute":
    using (var file = new FileStream(pathName))
    { ... }
    break;

case "registry":
    ...
    break;
}
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1  
That's what the sentence means, but the question is why is this justified? –  Greg Sansom Jan 21 '11 at 6:42
1  
The question was "What exactly would this 'exception' case look like". The fact that there is no alternative in C# is what justifies it. –  Zooba Jan 21 '11 at 6:45
1  
What would the exception case look like, not the implementation. ie in what circumstance would you want to do this. –  Greg Sansom Jan 21 '11 at 6:49
2  
"This exception case" refers to "in a switch-statement fallthrough," the use of the word "unless" indicating an exception to the general rule of "never use" that was specified before the subject, "goto." (Stop me if I'm going too fast.) –  Zooba Jan 22 '11 at 0:22

It's the only way that C# allows a switch case 'fallthrough'. In C# (unlike C, C++ , or Java), a case block in a switch statement must end with a break or some other explicit jump statement.

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   public enum ExitAction {
        Cancel,
        LogAndExit,
        Exit
    }

This is neater

ExitAction action = ExitAction.LogAndExit;
switch (action) {
    case ExitAction.Cancel:
        break;
    case ExitAction.LogAndExit:
        Log("Exiting");
        goto case ExitAction.Exit;
    case ExitAction.Exit:
        Quit();
        break;
}

Than this (especially if you do more work in Quit())

ExitAction action = ExitAction.LogAndExit;
switch (action) {
    case ExitAction.Cancel:
        break;
    case ExitAction.LogAndExit:
        Log("Exiting");
        Quit();
        break;
    case ExitAction.Exit:
        Quit();
        break;
}
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You can't goto case of enumerations - it has to be a constant. A shame really, since it would be handy, but that appears to be the behaviour. –  Zooba Jan 22 '11 at 0:20
3  
err, yes you can, enumerations are treated as constants –  djeeg Jan 22 '11 at 0:28
    
Gah, must've mistyped something when I tested it earlier. It compiles now... I swear it didn't before. Sorry. +1 –  Zooba Jan 22 '11 at 6:06

In addition to using goto case, you can goto a label that is in another case clause:

    switch(i) {
    case "0":
        // do some stuff
        break;
    case "1":
        // other stuff, then "fall through" to next case clause
        goto Case2;
    case "2":
    Case2:
        break;
    }

This way, you can jump to another case clause without worrying about the value or type of the expression.

Some sort of explicit "fallthrough" keyword that can be substituted for break would have been nice, though...

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1  
I just realized this is a year old; sorry about that! I'm still stuck in 2011. –  Robert T. Adams Feb 11 '12 at 8:05
1  
It might be necromancy, but it's the good type of necromancy. It actually helped me. :) +1'd –  moskalak Jan 3 '14 at 11:11

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