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Is there any performance benefits of one over another among Convert.ChangeType or Convert.ToInt32 or int.Parse

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1  
Don't forget about Int32.TryParse(String, out int) which gives a few nice possibilities. – chiffre Jan 21 '11 at 8:25
up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you know you're going to be converting a string to Int32, using Convert.ChangeType seems an obscure way of doing that. I would definitely prefer either of the other calls to that.

The main difference between int.Parse and Convert.ToInt32(x) is that Convert.ToInt32(null) returns 0 where as int.Parse(null) will throw an exception. Of course, int.Parse also gives you more control in terms of what culture is used.

I very much doubt that there's any performance benefit of one over the other: I would expect Convert.ToInt32 to call int.Parse rather than the other way round - but it's not documented to work that way, and the hit of a single method call is unlikely to be significant. (It may well be inlined anyway.)

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Both Convert.ToInt32() and Int32.Parse() use the (not publicly available) method System.Number.ParseInt32() which in turn invokes System.Number.StringToNumber(). How do I know this? Look at the stack trace of the FormatException that is generated when passing an invalid string :-) – Elian Ebbing Jan 21 '11 at 7:35
    
@user532870: Fair enough - but I still wouldn't rely on that sort of thing :) – Jon Skeet Jan 21 '11 at 7:39
    
@user532870: Jon is right. reflection shows that Convert.ToInt32 calls int.Parse which calls Number.ParseInt32. @Jon: So int.Parse is better? – naveen Jan 21 '11 at 8:32
1  
@naveen: It depends on what exact behaviour you want. If you're happy with it using the current culture and you want it to return 0 for null, use Convert.ToInt32. If you want the behaviour of int.Parse, use that :) – Jon Skeet Jan 21 '11 at 9:52
private const int maxValue = 1000000;
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string[] strArray = new string[maxValue];
        for (int i = 0; i < maxValue; i++)
        {
            strArray[i] = i.ToString();
        }
        int[] parsedNums = new int[maxValue];
        CalcChangeTypePerf(strArray,parsedNums);
        CalcToInt32Perf(strArray, parsedNums);
        CalcIntParse(strArray, parsedNums);
    }
    public static void CalcChangeTypePerf(string[] strArray,int[] parsedArray)
    {
        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < maxValue; i++)
        {
            parsedArray[i] = (int)Convert.ChangeType(strArray[i], typeof(int));
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("{0} on CalcChangeTypePerf", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
    public static void CalcToInt32Perf(string[] strArray, int[] parsedArray)
    {
        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < maxValue; i++)
        {
            parsedArray[i] = Convert.ToInt32(strArray[i]);
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("{0} on CalcToInt32Perf", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
    public static void CalcIntParse(string[] strArray, int[] parsedArray)
    {
        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < maxValue; i++)
        {
            parsedArray[i] = int.Parse(strArray[i]);
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("{0} on CalcIntParse", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

This simple test results this

266 on CalcChangeTypePerf
167 on CalcToInt32Perf
165 on CalcIntParse
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2  
You're creating a million objects in each test, unnecessarily. While each test is "equal" in that way, it means the relative differences in actual parsing time are masked somewhat, and there could be garbage collection within one test, cleaning up garbage from another. I suggest you create an array of strings once at the start and reuse it. – Jon Skeet Jan 21 '11 at 7:41
    
Fixed Jon, You are right, times are really different... – Arsen Mkrtchyan Jan 21 '11 at 7:58

Simple test shows Parse() is fastest method, next Convert.ToInt32() and last Convert.ChangeType():

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string s = "104563";
    int a = 1;

    for (int k = 0; k < 4; k++)
    {
        Stopwatch w = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
            a = (int)Convert.ChangeType(s, typeof(int));
        w.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine("ChangeType={0}", w.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        Stopwatch w1 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
            a = Convert.ToInt32(s);
        w1.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine("ToInt32={0}", w1.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        Stopwatch w2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
            a = Int32.Parse(s);
        w2.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Parse={0}", w2.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

    Console.ReadLine();
}

Result is:

ChangeType=2422
ToInt32=1859
Parse=1760
ChangeType=2374
ToInt32=1857
Parse=1762
ChangeType=2378
ToInt32=1860
Parse=1763
ChangeType=2375
ToInt32=1855
Parse=1759
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Yes.

Convert.ToInt32 is better than using Convert.ChangeType for same purpose.

ChangeType is a general-purpose conversion method that converts the object specified by value to conversionType. While ToInt32 is specific for int32 type.

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1  
In fact, ChangeType() is programmatic cast, meanwhile Convert.ToInt32() really creates int from other type – abatishchev Jan 21 '11 at 8:02

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