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In assembly language I use .section directive to tell the assembler what section to output to e.g

.section init

Is there a way to do the same in C files. I want the code for some files to go into different section so I can load it to different memory address. I know I can create a script for ld and specify sections there but I dont want to do that. Is there some compiler switch or .section directive kind of thing for C files that will do this?

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Similar to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/3516398/…. –  Matthew Iselin Jan 21 '11 at 8:02

1 Answer 1

There is:

__attribute__((section("section_name")))

So, for example:

void foo() __attribute__((section(".text_foo")));

....

void foo() {}

Would place foo in .text_foo

See here for more information.

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thanks but that is for one function only. I want some thing that will the same for complete C file –  binW Jan 21 '11 at 7:54
    
Tip: you can use a macro to make it less ugly. –  Artelius Jan 21 '11 at 7:54
    
A macro is a great choice, as it also helps with portability. –  Matthew Iselin Jan 21 '11 at 7:57
2  
@binW: frankly, the best way to do that is to use a linker script. From the GCC docs: "If you need to map the entire contents of a module to a particular section, consider using the facilities of the linker instead." (gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.4.5/gcc/Variable-Attributes.html) –  Matthew Iselin Jan 21 '11 at 7:59
    
I am going to use linker script but I need multiple text sections i.e .init, .text and more. To add files to specific sections i will need to name every file like foo.o(.text) and i want to avoid that. I am hoping I can do something like *(.my_section) –  binW Jan 21 '11 at 8:06

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