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When we see #include <iostream>, it is said to be a preprocessor directive.

#include ---> directive

And, I think:

<iostream> ---> preprocessor

But, what is meant by "preprocessor" and "directive"?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

It may help to think of the relationship between a "directive" and being "given directions" (i.e. orders). "preprocessor directives" are directions to the preprocessor about changes it should make to the code before the later stages of compilation kick in. But, what's the preprocessor? Well, it's name is a bit recursive: it's simply there to process the textual source code, modifying it in various ways. This extra process gives more flexibility in selecting, combining and even generating parts of the program.

EDIT addressing @SWEngineer's comment: Think of the preprocessor being a separate program that modifies the C++ program, then gives its output to the "real" C++ compiler (this is pretty much the way it used to be). When the preprocessor sees "#include " it thinks "ahhha - this is something I understand, I'm going to take care of this and not just pass it through blindly to the C++ compiler". So, it searches a number of directories (some standard ones like /usr/include and wherever the compiler installed its own headers, as well as others specified using -I on the commandline) looking for a file called "iostream". When it finds it, it then replaces the line in the input program saying "#include " with the complete contents of the file called "iostream", adding the result to the output. BUT, it next moves to the first line it read from the "iostream" file, looking for more directives that it understands.

So, the preprocessor is very simple. It can understand #include, #define, #if/#elif/#endif, #warning, but not much else. It doesn't have a clue what an "int" is, a template, a class, or any of that "real" C++ stuff. It's more like some automated editor that cuts and pastes parts of files and code around, preparing the program that the C++ compiler proper will eventually see and process. The preprocessor is still very useful, because it knows how to find parts of the program in all those different directories (the next stage in compilation doesn't need to know anything about that), and it can remove code that might work on some other computer system but wouldn't be valid on the one in use. It can also allow the program to use short, concise macro statements that generate a lot of real C++ code, making the program more manageable.

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@Tony. Can you just explain it in terms of for example "#include <iostream>" as an example? Since I'm almost getting it. Thanks. – Simplicity Jan 21 '11 at 10:28
    
@Tony. ("preprocessor directives" are directions to the preprocessor about changes it should make to the code before the later stages of compilation kick in). What are examples of changes here? Thanks. – Simplicity Jan 21 '11 at 10:31
    
@Tony. Sorry for my many questions here. Regarding the "Preprocessor", can you just describe it in a bit more detail? Thanks. – Simplicity Jan 21 '11 at 10:32
    
@SWEngineer: I've tried to explain a bit better above. Hope that helps. I've got somewhere else to be though - might not check online for hours or days... sorry. Hope it's enough. – Tony D Jan 21 '11 at 10:41
    
@Tony. Thanks a lot for your nice explanation, really appreciate it. Just a small thing when you find sometime. When you say: "BUT, it next moves to the first line it read from the "iostream" file, looking for more directives that it understands.". What about the other preprocessor directives in the .cpp file to be compiled and run? Thanks a lot. – Simplicity Jan 21 '11 at 11:22

#include is the preprocessor directive, <iostream> is just an argument supplied in addition to this directive, which in this case happens to be a file name.

Some preprocessor directives take arguments, some don't, e.g.

#define FOO 1

#ifdef _NDEBUG
    ....
#else
    ....
#endif

#warning Untested code !

The common feature is that they all start with #.

In Olden Times the preprocessor was a separate tool which pre-processed source code before passing it to the compiler front-end, performing macro substitutions and including header files, etc. These days the pre-processor is usually an integral part of the compiler, but it essentially just does the same job.

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Preprocessor directives, such as #define and #ifdef, are typically used to make source programs easy to change and easy to compile in different execution environments. Directives in the source file tell the preprocessor to perform specific actions. For example, the preprocessor can replace tokens in the text, insert the contents of other files into the source file...

#include is a preprocessor directive meaning that it is use by the preprocessor part of the compiler. This happens 'before' the compilation process. The #include needs to specify 'what' to include, this is supplied by the argument iostream. This tells the preprocessor to include the file iostream.h.

More information:

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"The #include needs to specify 'what' to include, this is supplied by the argument iostream. This tells the preprocessor to include the file iostream.h." No, it doesn't. It tells the preprocessor to include the file iostream. – Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 21 '11 at 17:26

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