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Is this a valid use of a const_cast ? I am using it in a constructor and it looks as follows:

KeyLiteObject(const char * extension, const char * swap_suffix)
        :    _extension(extension),
             _swap_suffix(swap_suffix),
             _swap_suffix_extension(swap_suffix) 
{
    const_cast<std::string*>(&_swap_suffix_extension)->append(_extension);
}

Yes, the strings will never change.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Assuming that _swap_suffix_extension is a const std::string then why not just do this:

KeyLiteObject(const char * extension, const char * swap_suffix)
        :    _extension(extension),
             _swap_suffix(swap_suffix),
             _swap_suffix_extension( std::string( swap_suffix ) + std::string( extension ) ) 
{
}

Then you can totally avoid the const_cast ...

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Eureka ! That is the answer I was looking for lol. –  Hassan Syed Jan 21 '11 at 9:44
1  
Just for the record, at the risk of being a bit more confusing to beginners, but being nicely more concise, you can have just one side of the string concatenation be a std::string object: _swap_suffix_extension(std::string(swap_suffix) + _extension). –  Tony D Jan 21 '11 at 9:45
    
If I didn't have a object that was so well defined as string, would using a const_cast in the constructor body be acceptable though ? –  Hassan Syed Jan 21 '11 at 9:48
    
@Tony: Yeah I know and I almost left it at that. I just thought the above was slightly more obvious. I guess it might be slower but it depends whether "std::string::operator + ( std::string, char* )" builds a std::string object before using the normal ( std::string, std::string ) add or not ... –  Goz Jan 21 '11 at 9:49
1  
@Hassan: In my opinion (and people may well disagree) you should NEVER use const_cast. If you need to use it then there is a flaw in your design. In fact it was only introduced to handle the cases where a library has not been written with proper const correctness. That way you can actually get on with life rather than having to put in requests to get the library code fixed (if indeed it is even actively supported). –  Goz Jan 21 '11 at 9:50

Whenever possible avoid the const_cast, and here it is quite possible for any given type. Just create a helper function that takes the two arguments, composes the final value of the constant and use it in the initializer:

// header file
struct test { 
   const type x; 
   test( type const & a, type const & b );
};
// implementation file
namespace {
   type compose( type const & arg1, type const & arg2 ) {
      // calculate the actual value here
   }
}
test::test(type const & a, type const & b) 
      : x( compose(a,b) ) 
{} 

The cost of that is just writting a single free (static or in an unnamed namespace) function in the implementation file, and the result it readable if you choose a proper name for the function. In your case: concatenate or concat would be good choices.

While the use of const_cast in the example will not lead to undefined behavior, I would avoid it for personal reasons. Casts are cumbersome to write in C++ (compare with C or Java) for a reason: so that they will call the attention of the programmer: something weird is going on here! If you start sprinkling casts, then you will get used to seeing them, and they will become natural.

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