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Readability aside, are there any discernable differences (performance perhaps) between using

str.indexOf("src") 

and

str.match(/src/)

I personally prefer match (and regexp) but colleagues seem to go the other way. We were wondering if it mattered ...?

EDIT:

I should have said at the outset that this is for functions that will be doing partial plain-string matching (to pick up identifiers in class attributes for JQuery) rather than full regexp searches with wildcards etc.

class='redBorder DisablesGuiClass-2345-2d73-83hf-8293' 

So its the difference between:

string.indexOf('DisablesGuiClass-');

VS

string.match(/DisablesGuiClass-/)
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5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

RegExp is indeed slower than indexOf (you can see it here), though normally this shouldn't be an issue. With RegExp, you also have to make sure the string is properly escaped, which is an extra thing to think about.

Both of those issues aside, if two tools do exactly what you need them to, why not choose the simpler one?

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Makes sense to me, henceforth we'll be running with indexOf unless additional RegExp functionality is required. Many thanks! PS. That configurable testpage you linked to in your response is cool - is it a publicly available thing or something of your own devising? –  5arx Jan 21 '11 at 11:12
3  
@5arx, jsperf, like jsfiddle, is an indispensable tool for quickly testing ideas out. It's a public site, just go to jsperf.com and create your own tests. –  Box9 Jan 21 '11 at 11:15
    
Cheers, I will do. –  5arx Jan 21 '11 at 11:16
2  
According to this jsperf test it simple not true that indexOf is always fast: stackoverflow.com/a/5296314/981933 –  Flek Oct 8 '13 at 7:17

You're comparing apples with oranges. indexOf is used with plain strings and is therefore very fast; match takes a regular expression - of course it is slower in comparison, but if you want to do a regex match, you won't get far with indexOf.

Use the right tool for the job at hand.

In your case, where you're looking for a verbatim string, indexOf should be sufficient. There is still one application for regexes, though: If you need to match entire words and want to avoid matching substrings, then regular expressions give you "word boundary anchors". For example:

indexOf('bar')

will find bar three times in bar, fubar, barmy, whereas

match(/\bbar\b/)

will only match bar when it is not part of a longer word.

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Apologies, I didn't supply enough info, pls see edit above. –  5arx Jan 21 '11 at 11:09

Using indexOf should, in theory, be faster than a regex when you're just searching for some plain text, but you should do some comparative benchmarks yourself if you're concerned about performance.

If you prefer match and it's fast enough for your needs then go for it.

For what it's worth, I agree with your colleagues on this: I'd use indexOf when searching for a plain string, and use match etc only when I need the extra functionality provided by regular expressions.

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arent all searches here for 'plain text'? I dont understand the distinction youre making between usage in regex and indexOf. –  qodeninja Oct 24 '13 at 18:25

Performance wise indexOf will at the very least be slightly faster than match. It all comes down to the specific implementation. When deciding which to use ask yourself the following question:

Will an integer index suffice or do I need the functionality of a RegExp match result?

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always use indexOf for existence of substrings and match only when you actually need it. i.e. if you were searching for the word src in a string that could also contain altsrc then aString.match(/\bsrc\b/) is indeed more appropriate.

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