Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have to import some UTF-8 encoded text-file into my C++Builder 5 program. Are there any components or code samples to accomplish that?

share|improve this question
    
ANSI is the American National Standards Institute. So I think you mean ASCII. –  Gumbo Jan 24 '09 at 12:10
    
Most likely he means Windows-1252 (also known as WinLatin1), which includes ASCII, but adds another 128 code points... –  Christoph Jan 24 '09 at 12:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are best off reading all the other questions on SO that are tagged unicode and c++. For starters you should probably look at this one and see whether library in the accepted answer (UTF8-CPP) works for you.

I would however first think about what you're trying to achieve, as there is no way you can just import UTF-8-encoded strings into "Ansi" (what ever you mean by that, maybe something like ISO8859_1 or WIN1252 encoding?).

share|improve this answer

Here is a more VCL-centric approach for you:

UTF8String utf8 = "...";
WideString utf16;
AnsiString latin1;

int len = ::MultiByteToWideChar(CP_UTF8, 0, utf8.c_str(), utf8.Length(), NULL, 0);
utf16.SetLength(len);
::MultiByteToWideChar(CP_UTF8, 0, utf8.c_str(), utf8.Length(), utf16.c_bstr(), len);

len = ::WideCharToMultiByte(1252, 0, utf16.c_bstr(), utf16.Length(), NULL, 0, NULL, NULL);
latin1.SetLength(len);
::WideCharToMultiByte(1252, 0, utf16.c_bstr(), utf16.Length(), latin1.c_str(), len, NULL, NULL);

If you upgrade to CB2009, you can simplify it to this:

UTF8String utf8 = "...";
AnsiString<1252> latin1 = utf8;
share|improve this answer

As there is no-one working on weekends, I have to answer it myself :)

String Utf8ToWinLatin1(char* aData, char* aValue)
{
    int i=0;
    for(int j=0;j<strlen(aData);)
    {	int val=aData[j];
    	int c=(unsigned char)aData[j];
    	if(c<=127)
    	{	aValue[i]=c;
    		j+=1;                                  
    		i++;
    	}
    	else if(c>=192 && c<=223)
    	{
    		aValue[i]=(c-192)*64 + (aData[j+1]-128);
    		i++;
    		j+=2;
    	}
    	else if(c>=224 && c<=239)
    	{
    		aValue[i]=(	c-224)*4096 + (aData[j+1]-128)*64 + (aData[j+2]-128);
    		i++;
    		j+=3;
    	}
    	else if(c>=240 && c<=247)
    	{
    		aValue[i]=(c-240)*262144 + (aData[j+1]-128)*4096 + (aData[j+2]-128)*64 + (aData[j+3]-128);
    		i++;
    		j+=4;
    	}
    	else if(c>=248 && c<=251)
    	{
    		aValue[i]=(c-248)*16777216 + (aData[j+1]-128)*262144+ (aData[j+2]-128)*4096 + (aData[j+3]-128)*64 + (aData[j+4]-128);
    		i++;
    		j+=5;
    	}
    	else
    		j+=1;
    }
    return aValue;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You should know that ASCII only has 128 characters compared to the 1,114,112 Unicode characters that can be encoded with UTF-8. So you will loose all characters that are not in the ASCII charset. –  Gumbo Jan 24 '09 at 12:12
    
You're function should be better called something like Utf8ToWinLatin1() - ConvertAnsi doesn't specify what get's converted to what; also, 'ANSI' isn't a name of any encoding... –  Christoph Jan 24 '09 at 12:45
    
I don't care about 1,000,000 characters - I only want my native ones back (ÕÖÄÜ). I called it Ansi, because that's what it is called in Notepad :) when you select SaveAs. –  Riho Jan 24 '09 at 20:21

Your question doesn't say specifically which character set you want to convert to. If you only want the basic 7-bit ASCII charset, discarding every character with a higher value than 127 will work.

If you want to convert to a 8-bit character set, such as latin1, you'll have to do it the hard way.

share|improve this answer
    
This way, you'll lose half the characters of WinLatin1 (aka 'ANSI') –  Christoph Jan 24 '09 at 12:47
    
He didn't ask about conversion to Latin1 though, just to "ANSI" which, well, can mean a lot of things. Of course you're right, if he wants to convert to some specific 8-bit character set (such as latin1) then you're right, this won't work. –  jalf Jan 24 '09 at 13:23
    
@jalf: 'ANSI' is a common, incorrect label for Windows-1252 (aka WinLatin1); check wikipedia for details... –  Christoph Jan 24 '09 at 13:31
    
"The term ANSI as used to signify Windows code pages is a historical reference, but is nowadays a misnomer that continues to persist in the Windows community" –  Christoph Jan 24 '09 at 13:32
    
Yep, not saying that isn't what he meant, just that if it isn't, and if he only wants the 128 ASCII chars, this is a much simpler solution than his own –  jalf Jan 24 '09 at 13:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.