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So, a simple question really, illustrated by the example below. When you compile this, the compiler appropriately(?) reports a warning (that we are comparing barfoo<int>::bar with barfoo<foo>::bar), now given bar is an enum - can I safely ignore this warning?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
struct foo
{
};

template <typename bob = int>
struct barfoo
{
  enum bar { ONE, TWO, THREE };

  bar action() const { return TWO; }
};

template <barfoo<>::bar eAction = barfoo<>::ONE>
struct IsAction
{
  template <typename bf>
  static bool check(bf const& cState)
  {
    return cState.action() == eAction;
  }  
};

int main(void)
{
  barfoo<foo> c;

  cout << IsAction<>::check(c) << endl;

  return 0;
}

Given I'm a stickler for removing warning messages, is there a way to satisfy the compiler without moving the enum outside?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The numeric representation of the enums will be the same, so it's safe to compare them directly (or even cast between them, although you may need to go through int to satisfy the compiler). If you want to silence the warning, one approach would be to cast them both to ints before doing the comparison: (int)cState.action == (int)eAction. You might be able to add a templated operator== for the enum to do this automatically - not sure on this point, though.

Alternately, depending on how you define "without moving the enum outside", you could derive from a non-templated base class that serves to hold the enum's definition, as in http://codepad.org/8bVlcas3

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I think the templated operator== would have the same issue, the derivation I think is the cleanest answer... Thanks. –  Nim Jan 21 '11 at 12:57
    
well, I meant you could do a template<typename A, typename B> bool operator==(const barfoo<A>::bar &, const barfoo<B>::bar &). A bit scary, but I think it would work... –  bdonlan Jan 21 '11 at 12:59
    
Ahh, I thought you meant the operator== in the enum, oops... hmm.. yes, I don't think I like the above operator== :) I've used the derivation and it's fine - I'm waiting for the time interval before I can accept the answer... :) –  Nim Jan 21 '11 at 13:05
    
@Nim, what do you mean? The only difference between struct and class in C++ is that struct defaults to public visibility, while class defaults to private visibility –  bdonlan Jan 21 '11 at 13:19
    
@Nim, example of the derivation approach: codepad.org/8bVlcas3 –  bdonlan Jan 21 '11 at 13:21
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I would move it outside but to a base-class:

struct barenum
{ 
   enum bar { ONE, TWO, THREE };

 protected: // because we are going to derive from it without a virtual destructor
   ~barenum() {}
};

template <typename bob = int>
struct barfoo : barenum
{
  bar action() const { return TWO; }
};
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He explicitely wrote 'is there a way to satisfy the compiler without moving the enum outside?'. –  Frerich Raabe Jan 21 '11 at 13:02
    
@Frerich, I think unless I cast to int, this is the best option too - this fits what I'm doing anyway, so have taken this approach. @CashCow, sorry I can't accept your answer as @bdonlan mentioned this first. –  Nim Jan 21 '11 at 13:07
    
@French by "outside the class" the assumption was he meant into global or namespace scope, not into a base-class scope. –  CashCow Jan 23 '11 at 1:26
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does moving the enum into a parent of barfoo count?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
struct foo
{
};

struct barfoobase
{
  enum bar { ONE, TWO, THREE };
};

template <typename bob = int>
struct barfoo : public barfoobase
{
  bar action() const { return TWO; }
};

template <barfoobase::bar eAction = barfoobase::ONE>
struct IsAction
{
  template <typename bf>
  static bool check(bf const& cState)
  {
    return cState.action() == eAction;
  }  
};

int main(void)
{
  barfoo<foo> c;

  cout << IsAction<>::check(c) << endl;

  return 0;
}

edit: Oops, that answer has already been posted...

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that 3 of us came up with the same answer may indicate what a good answer it is? –  CashCow Jan 23 '11 at 1:25
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