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I've noticed that e.g. the Samsung Galaxy S allows apps to allocate much more memory (>24Mb) than a Droid (<=24Mb) or a G1 (<=16Mb) before OutOfMemoryExceptions are thrown. I'd like my app to scale to higher end devices like the Galaxy and take advantage of the higher allocation limit.

Is there a reliable way to detect how much memory my app can use? Is it risky to attempt to use e.g. 70% of the maximum memory reported? Otherwise, I'd need to limit my app to what the G1 allows to guarantee my app won't crash.

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@rebeccaT: "I've noticed that e.g. the Samsung Galaxy S allows apps to allocate much more memory (>24Mb) than a Droid (<=24Mb) or a G1 (<=16Mb) before OutOfMemoryExceptions are thrown." -- is this just through experience, or is that documented somewhere? I would have expected the S to still have a 24MB heap limit, with larger heaps reserved for tablets and such. –  CommonsWare Jan 21 '11 at 13:51
    
This is why I'm posting my question: newer phones seem to have a much higher allocation limit but I can't find anything in the documentation about how to make the most of this. I'm making an image editor and I can get about 10 800x400 images stored in memory on a Droid and about 30 for the Galaxy. It would be a shame to limit everyone to G1 levels (especially for tablet users). Runtime.getRuntime().totalMemory() and .maxMemory() seem to return useful values but I don't know if I can rely on them. Any advice? –  rbcc Jan 21 '11 at 14:13
    
Runtime.getRuntime().totalMemory() seems to be very unreliable, after allocating some byte arrays it is even growing for me... but I'm curios if someone has a definitive answer here as well. –  anselm Jan 21 '11 at 14:25
    
@anselm: I've found (Runtime.getRuntime().totalMemory() + android.os.Debug.getNativeHeapAllocatedSize()) a very accurate indicator myself. As soon as this goes over 24Mb on a Droid for example, the app will raise OutOfMemoryException. For your byte arrays, you need to remember that they'll need to be garbage collected first before your reported usage will go down. –  rbcc Jan 21 '11 at 15:19
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I would like to know how the benefit of knowing there is more space and the changes that result in the program then just programming for the common denominator? –  NebulaFox Jan 21 '11 at 15:44

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