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I am working on a small ASP.NET MVC project at the moment.
I am trying to implement Nhibernate to persist on a MS Sql Server database. Having spent long hours studying DDD and other projects found on the Internet I have decided to go for the repository pattern. Now I ma facing a dilemma.
Do I really need a repository when using Nhinbernate?
Wouldn't it be better to have a Service Layer (I don't have a Service Layer at the moment) which interacts with Nhinbernate avoiding to write many times something like that:

public Domain.Reminder GetById(Guid Code)
{
    return (_session.Get<Domain.Reminder>(Code));
}

public Domain.Reminder LoadById(Guid Code)
{
    return (_session.Load<Domain.Reminder>(Code));
}

public bool Save(Domain.Reminder Reminder)
{
    _session.SaveOrUpdate(Reminder);
    return (true);
}

public bool Delete(Domain.Reminder Reminder)
{
    _session.Delete(Reminder);
    return (true);
}

I found an old Ayende's POST which is against repositories.
I know there's a huge debate around these topics and the answer is always ... depends, but it seems to me that with too many layers of abstractions things get more complicated and hard to follow.
Am I wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Just a small note. There is no small-medium project, it can be small for now, but tomorrow your manager will ask you another feature, and then another one, and another one, and in the end you will have a huge project with a small-medium architecture. I really dont' like Big Design Up Front, but sometimes you need to think a bit ahead. –  oenning Jan 21 '11 at 14:00
    
I agree with you completely but, really, I can't see the benefit in using repository if not for the fact that I might not use nihbernate in the future. It's generating lot of extra-work which I can't justify at the moment. –  LeftyX Jan 21 '11 at 14:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Ayende was against writing a repository the way you did because of the reasons you asked this question, it is repetitive code and NH can handle all of it anyways. He advocates just calling NH directly as you would a repository, and stop worrying about it.

I pretty much agree with him. There really isn't much to gain except for more work.

share|improve this answer
    
I must confess that this is the answer I wanted to hear :-) –  LeftyX Jan 21 '11 at 14:55

Use a generic Repository instead. One repository per class can easily be overkill.

I use one repository with Get, Load, Save methods and various Matching-methods (one for Linq and one for my domain queries).

public class NHibernateRepository : IRepository
{
    private readonly ISession _session;

    public NHibernateRepository(ISession session)
    {
        _session = session;
    }

    public T Load<T>(Guid id)
    {
        return _session.Load<T>(id);
    }

    public T Get<T>(Guid id)
    {
        return _session.Get<T>(id);
    }

    public void Save<T>(T obj)
    {
        _session.SaveOrUpdate(obj);
    }

    public void Delete<T>(T obj)
    {
        _session.Delete(obj);
    }

    //Get all T
    public IEnumerable<T> Matching<T>() where T : DomainObject
    {
        return _session.CreateCriteria<T>().List<T>();
    }

    //NHibernate 3.0 Linq
    public IQueryable<T> Matching<T>(Expression<Func<T, bool>> predicate)
    {
        return _session.Query<T>().Where(predicate);
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> Matching<T>(ICreateCriteria<T> query, params IAppendCriterion[] extraCriterias)
    {
        var criteria = query.GetCriteria();
        foreach (var criterion in extraCriterias)
        {
            criterion.Append(criteria);
        }

        return criteria.GetExecutableCriteria(_session).List<T>();
    }
}

The last method accepts a ICreateCritiera implementation. Below is the interface and one implementation of it.

public interface ICreateCriteria<T> : ICreateCriteria
{
    DetachedCriteria GetCriteria();
}

public class ChallengesAvailableToRound : ICreateCriteria<Challenge>
{
    private readonly Guid _roundId;

    public ChallengesAvailableToRound(Round round)
    {
        _roundId = round.Id;
    }

    public DetachedCriteria GetCriteria()
    {
        var criteria = DetachedCriteria.For<Challenge>().
            CreateAlias("Event", "e").
            CreateAlias("e.Rounds", "rounds").
            Add(Restrictions.Eq("rounds.Id", _roundId));

        return criteria;
    }
}

This lets me break out the queries to their own classes and reuse them all over my project easily.

share|improve this answer
    
I like your idea Kenny. I'll try to work on it. Thanks –  LeftyX Jan 21 '11 at 16:22
    
Kenny, I think your solution is good enough for me. Thanks. –  LeftyX Jan 24 '11 at 8:50

I found some reasons why you should use Repository/DAO/Whatever.

  1. Unit Testing. I never tried to mock/stub an ISession, but I would say that it should be a LOT more complex than mocking or stubbing a Repository/DAO Interface.
  2. Reuse of Code. If you write your query directly into your Services/Controllers you will end up duplicating it when you need to reuse a specific query. If you have it wrapper into a Repository, just call it's method.
  3. Single Responsibility Principle. Spreading your queries around your Controllers makes you break this principle.
  4. NHibernate Dependency. Ok, this is hard to happen, but if you need to change your ORM, the repositories make it easier ( look, it's easier, not easy :) ). Or even when you need to change the user DataSource from a Database to Microsoft Active Directory, it would be easier.

That's it for know, can't remember anything else.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Oenning. I don't want to write queries in my controllers but in a service layer. I think that's a good place to put some business logic too. It wouldn't be in the UI and it would be reusable if I want to plug my service layer somewhere else. Nhibernate dependency. Well,yes,I can agree but I don't think it's going to happen soon and I don't think it is that different from changing a repository. Thanks anyway. –  LeftyX Jan 21 '11 at 14:47
    
1. If you mock repos your are using the "known fixture" test anti pattern. 2. Nothing says you cannot create abstractions in your service layer. This is completely false. 3. Not at all. Your going to call the db someplace. Whether its in a service or repo method call or part of the controller doesn't matter. Still the same code. The controller is still responsible for querying the db. –  jfar Jan 21 '11 at 15:02
    
@jfar 1. What is the "known fixture" test anti pattern? Never heard of it. I always mock my Repositories. 2. If I got what you said right, you will end up the same design as a Repository but you will call it something else. Got any example of this? I would like to see some code on this one. 3. The controller is not responsible for querying the db, he needs to ask someone else to do it. He receives the request and based on it delegates tasks to other classes and choose the next view. –  oenning Jan 21 '11 at 15:22
    
1. Can't find the docs on the xunit test page anymore. Don't have enough room here to explain it. 2. I'm confused by your confusion. You can always remove duplicate functionality no matter the pattern you use. 3. Right, the controller is asking NHibernate to query the db in this case. 99% of repositories become meaning less facades. –  jfar Jan 21 '11 at 16:17

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