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Using complex return type:

Public Type TimeType
    hours As Integer
    minutes As Integer
End Type

Public Function ParseTimeField(time As String) As TimeType
    Dim timeObject As TimeType
    Dim amountOfDigitHours As Integer

    If time = "" Then time = "0"

    If HasHoursAndMinutesParts(time) Then
        amountOfDigitHours = GetAmountOfDigitHours(time)
        timeObject.hours = CInt(Left(time, amountOfDigitHours))
        timeObject.minutes = CInt(Right(time, 2))
    Else
        timeObject.hours = 0
        timeObject.minutes = CInt(time)
    End If

    ParseTimeField = timeObject
End Function

Private Function HasHoursAndMinutesParts(time As String) As Boolean
    HasHoursAndMinutesParts = Len(time) > 2
End Function

Private Function GetAmountOfDigitHours(time As String) As Integer
    GetAmountOfDigitHours = Len(time) - 2
End Function

Call:

Dim timeObj As TimeType
timeObj = ParseTimeField(strTime)

OR using out parameters:

Public Function ParseTimeField(time As String, ByRef hours As Integer, ByRef minutes As Integer)
    Dim timeObject As TimeType
    Dim amountOfDigitHours As Integer

    If time = "" Then time = "0"

    If HasHoursAndMinutesParts(time) Then
        amountOfDigitHours = GetAmountOfDigitHours(time)
        hours = CInt(Left(time, amountOfDigitHours))
        minutes = CInt(Right(time, 2))
    Else
        hours = 0
        minutes = CInt(time)
    End If

    ParseTimeField = timeObject
End Function

Private Function HasHoursAndMinutesParts(time As String) As Boolean
    HasHoursAndMinutesParts = Len(time) > 2
End Function

Private Function GetAmountOfDigitHours(time As String) As Integer
    GetAmountOfDigitHours = Len(time) - 2
End Function

Call:

Dim hours As Integer
Dim minutes As Integer

Call ParseTimeField(strTime, hours, minutes)

BTW this is VB6 code =)

share|improve this question
    
Let it return a TimeSpan and be done with it. –  Hans Passant Jan 21 '11 at 14:42
    
it is VB6 code :o But your answer is favorating the complex type. –  Rookian Jan 21 '11 at 16:20
    
The native VB6 type for times is Date msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa262556(v=VS.60).aspx –  MarkJ Jan 22 '11 at 20:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you have a single return type, do not use an out parameter to return it.

In general, I find multiple ref/out parameters to be a code smell. If you need to return data from your method, it is better if it is in one coherent object.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with you. I hade a controversion with my team mates and the tend to use the out/ref params, because adding an extra type for the function result was overload for them. But when I look at the using of the function they have to define 2 variables all the time instead of one variable ;) . Nevertheless I had to give up and had to choose the out/ref style :s ... poor junior developers ...^^ –  Rookian Jan 21 '11 at 16:27

I have a feeling we're going to see different opinions on this matter. Not sure there exists a best practice.

I usually prefer complex datatypes because I feel that is more in line with the original structure of functions where output parameter preceed the input parameters in the signature. Basically I don't like out parameters - they're superfluous. Whenever there's two ways of doing a thing in a programming language, you complicate unneccessary (guess I'm gonna get killed by Perl-fanatics stating this). You return data with the return statement. Period.

This said, I still find myself using out parameters often when I need to return two parameteres that have no natural grouping - i.e. would end up in a class which would be used solely in the return value of this specific function.

Whenever there's three or more parameters in the return data, I never use out simply because I find the calling code to be excessive verbose - needing to Dim the variables (or var'em in C#)

share|improve this answer
1  
I'd agree with this, except to add that when you have three or more out parameters that don't form a natural class, it is likely there is a problem with the design. –  Brian Hooper Jan 25 '11 at 9:03

I tend to use out params as the universal style. Rarely need to implement helper functions that return UDT but these are usually private to the module so I can keep the scope of the UDT private to the module too.

In the latter case usually consume the retval like this

With ParseTimeField(strTime)
    Debug.Print .hours, .minutes
End With

... and most probably would keep TimeType with private scope.

share|improve this answer
    
why should I keep the TimeType in private scope? –  Rookian Jan 21 '11 at 16:23
    
You don't. But if you declare it public on a public class then you are publishing it to the world. Anyway, what do you think about the With Method(...) trick? –  wqw Jan 21 '11 at 18:51
    
it's interessting :) I did not know that you can do this. –  Rookian Jan 22 '11 at 19:07

Definately a matter of opinion. I do use ByRef parameters from time to time, especially for utility functions which require a success/fail type scenario. For example, the TryParse functions in the .net framework do exactly this. Your parametrised function could look like:

Public Function ParseTimeField(time As String, ByRef hours As Integer, ByRef minutes As Integer) As Boolean
    'Do stuff'
    ParseTimeField = True 'or false depending on output success'
End Sub

Meaning you can call it like:

Dim hours As Integer
Dim mins as Integer
If ParseTimeField(time, hours, mins) = True Then
    'It worked'
End If

However as things start to get more complicated, and you're actually returning business items as opposed to doing logical commands, then a separate class and a return type is more desirable. It also makes calling AND returning easier to maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
the problem I have with this solution is that hours and mins is populated magically. –  Rookian Jan 21 '11 at 16:21
    
@Rookian yes you're right, it does seem a bit magic doesn't it?! Unless you're very aware of this code (i.e. you wrote it) then it's sort of an unnatural behaviour. It is usually expected to have a proper return type for this sort of code. –  Tom Jan 21 '11 at 16:29
    
you changed the responsiblities of the function. You implemented a function in the "try" way. So you should rename the function to "TryParseTimeField". But that was not that what I wanted to have. –  Rookian Jan 22 '11 at 19:09

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