Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

after a bit speedtracing I found a piece of code (called very very often) which converts values of one enum to values of another enum, like this:

public Enum2 ConvertToEnum2(Enum1 enum1)
{
   switch(enum1)
   {
      case Enum1.One:
         return Enum2.One;
         break;
      case Enum1.Two:
         return Enum2.Two;
         break;
   }
}

Would it me more performant if I save those conversions in a Dictionary and just do something like this:

public Enum2 ConvertToEnum2(Enum1 enum1)
{
   return m_ConversionTable[enum1];
}

Thanks for your comments!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A dictionary definitely would not be faster.

If the enums in the Enum1 are sequential then an array of Enum2 would likely be faster (but that could be marginal). IF the Enum1 is close to sequential so that the array isn't too spares it may still be useful approach.

For an enum with the [Flags] attribute then the switch is probably the best.

share|improve this answer
    
If the enums are close, the optimizer is likeyl to implement a jump table, so in that case the switch would be better, too. (Don't know if C#/.NET actually does that, though, but it is a common optimization) –  peterchen Jan 24 '09 at 15:55
    
@peterchen: Like said its marginal, jump table takes code execution to a point of code which then returns a value. An array lookup would be comparable to the jump table look but there is no return to process. Once optimised I doubt there would be much difference. –  AnthonyWJones Jan 24 '09 at 16:03
    
Actually if the values are frequently different, and don't follow a very simple pattern, then the jump table is likely to perform significantly worse than an array lookup due to branch mis-predictions. –  BeeOnRope Mar 29 '11 at 18:38
    
@BeeOnRope: Well we were considering a comparison with "Dictionary" not an array or Jump table. Also are you sure after all optimisations have been performed by the compiler and the JIT that the switch doesn't end up implemented as a Jump table anyway? –  AnthonyWJones Mar 29 '11 at 19:20

Are you sure that it's a botteneck? I found that many profilers report incorrect time percentages for small methods.
In my computer I can execute 100 millons conversions between enums with 10 elements in 1.7 seconds using a switch (Anthony's answer is 10 time faster).

share|improve this answer

This will likely depend on your enums. For small enums, I would expect that a switch is likely the fastest method, while for very large enums, a dictionary lookup might be faster.

To get a definitive answer, you will have to measure it, using your enums.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.