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When a mobile user views my site they are redirected to a mobile version. I have a "view full" option to allow them to view the actual site instead. Problem is when they do they will get redirected back. Is there away to bypass the redirect or only redirect the first time?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As far as I know, almost all mobile browsers have basic cookie support. PHP setcookie (documentation here) will allow you to do something like this:

setcookie('default_view', MOBILE);

Where MOBILE is defined ahead of time. You're also free to use a string here.

The upside is you won't have to worry about the query string once this cookie is set. SLaks' solution will work, but you would have to pay attention to append redirect=false to every URL that has a redirect-checker.

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the mobile devices are storing the cookie. –  dcp3450 Jan 21 '11 at 16:38
    
I'm not exactly sure what the question is. Could you please clarify? –  Steven Xu Jan 21 '11 at 17:06
    
I did it using sessions. I check HTTP_REFERER to see if our mobile address is in the address using strpos. If it is then I set a session value. As long as the session is still active they can use the full site. If they return to the mobile site the the session is destroyed. Works perfect! –  dcp3450 Jan 21 '11 at 17:12

You can add a querysting such as ?redirect=false.
Before redirecting, check for this querystring.

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Is there a way to persist this query string (e.g., in server configuration files or something) so you don't have to refactor existing links? –  Steven Xu Jan 21 '11 at 15:13
    
@Steven: What would that mean? (other than using cookies) –  SLaks Jan 21 '11 at 15:14
    
Well suppose the application code has a whole bunch of links back to the home page (let's say for now that redirection is only done on requests to the home page). Wouldn't you have to go back to all those links manually and add in redirect=false if the query string had been passed in on the request? –  Steven Xu Jan 21 '11 at 15:20
    
@Steven: Correct. I don't know PHP or Apache; it might be possible to do that in an output filter. –  SLaks Jan 21 '11 at 15:21

Adding to SLaks' answer, you could add a cookie 'redirect=false'. The advantage of this is, that you don't have to place the GET parameter on every link, so people stay on the normal page even after following internal links.

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[COOKIES] Do not rely on cookies being available. From w3.org/TR/mobile-bp/#d0e1925 Many older mobile phones do not have cookies. –  Christa Jan 21 '11 at 15:13
    
@Christa: True, that relying on cookies is not the best idea. But it works most of the time and is sufficiently easy to implement. –  Boldewyn Jan 21 '11 at 19:19

I did it using sessions. I check HTTP_REFERER to see if our mobile address is in the address using strpos. If it is then I set a session value. As long as the session is still active they can use the full site. If they return to the mobile site the the session is destroyed. Works perfect!

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What I suggest you is using the database. When somebody enters your site write the IP of every user and also version of the site.

|____ id ______| site version |

| 88.75.125.xxx | normal |

| 93.108.111.xxx | mobile |

When the user changes the version you can edit the proper id.

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Mobile users are really often on a private network behind a proxy. Therefore you will have a lot of different users with the same IP... –  Twister Jan 21 '11 at 16:31
    
@Twister; You are right. I didn't think that. –  borayeris Jan 21 '11 at 18:00

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