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I've just put together the below shown bash script in order to make continuous backups from a set folder.

It appears however that the find call seems to not only include /home/myfoldertobackup/ in the backup, but also the tar it checks file age of. Why on earth is this and what can I do to only make sure that the previously mentioned folder only is put into the tar?

if [ -e $filename ];
then
    # Tar exist. Check if tar is older than five days and if so, update it.
    find $filename -mtime +5 -exec tar -czvf $filename /home/myfoldertobackup/ {} \;
else
    #Tar doesn't exist. Force creation of tar!
    tar -czvPf $filename /home/myfoldertobackup/
fi
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3  
Note that your backup strategy ensures that if the new backup fails for any reason, your previous backup has been destroyed - so you are worse off than you were before. Do not destroy the old backup until you know that the new one is complete. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 21 '11 at 15:33
    
Hi Jonathan. Absolutely good point! Would you say that making the tars in an temp location and then moving them in to the backup target place would be more appropriate? – Industrial Jan 21 '11 at 16:55
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If "$filename" last modification time is older than 5 days, find runs the following command:

tar -cvfz $filename /home/myfoldertobackups/ $filename

which puts /home/myfoldertobackup and $filename (probably truncated since tar is going to write on it) in $filename; if you don't want $filename just write

find $filename -mtime +5 -exec tar -cvz /home/myfoldertobackups -f {} \;

or better (because more readable)

if [ -n "$(find $filename -mtime +5)" ]; then
    tar -cvzf "$filename" /home/myfoldertobackups;
fi

UPDATE

Here is your code with my proposed change:

if [ -e $filename ];
then
    # Tar exist. Check if tar is older than five days and if so, update it.
    # find $filename -mtime +5 -exec tar -czvf $filename /home/myfoldertobackup/ {} \;
    if [ -n "$(find $filename -mtime +5)" ]; then
        tar -cvzf "$filename" /home/myfoldertobackups;
    fi
else
    #Tar doesn't exist. Force creation of tar!
    tar -czvPf $filename /home/myfoldertobackup/
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Marco! Big thanks for this. I might be slightly retarded, but does your solution take account the fact that the file might not exist also? – Industrial Jan 21 '11 at 16:34
    
No, there's nothing wrong with you: my solution replaces only the find command; anyway, I'll update my answer with the full code :) – marco Jan 21 '11 at 20:30
    
Hi Marco. Thanks a lot for your help! – Industrial Jan 22 '11 at 15:59

that is because find replaces {} for the name of the file it found. Just drop {} and you are done.

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