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int Myfunc2(int array[])
{
   //however the length of array is different in 2 compiler here.
   //it is a zero terminated array. but when passed into Myfunc2, array's second
   //elements becomes 0;
     do_something(array);
}

struct A
{
    int a;
    int b[5];
};
int Myfunc1()
{
     struct A st;
     Init(&st);
    Myfunc2((&st)->b);
} 

Myfunc2 uses the second element in the array pointed by p.

In visual studio it's an array passed with the original size. While in gcc the array is size of 1. Which one is correct?

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5  
Huh? Can you explain more, please? –  San Jacinto Jan 21 '11 at 15:39
    
Yes, please clarify. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 21 '11 at 15:43
    
How are you determining the length of the array? –  John Bode Jan 21 '11 at 15:52
    
@John: the last element is 0. –  Kim Jan 21 '11 at 16:05
1  
K.: First of all, please post code that actually compiles; you should be getting an error on the MyFunc2(st->b); call, since st is not of pointer type. Secondly, I assume Init loads the contents of the b array; have you verified that it's behaving properly on both platforms? Because if not, that smells like you're either relying on behavior that's undefined, or you're clobbering memory somewhere else. –  John Bode Jan 21 '11 at 16:14

2 Answers 2

When declaring a function to accept an array, it is silently converted to accept a pointer to the first element. So your code int Myfunc2(int array[]); silently becomes int Myfunc2(int *array);

No array length information is passed to the called function. Can you please post the code to Myfunc2() to show us how you are attempting to get this information?

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C and C++ have no notion of "array length." You can use the sizeof() operator divided by the sizeof() your data type on statically-defined arrays in the SAME scope in which it was declared.

You may have a better use case for std::vector if you need to know the size. Or, just as easily, pass the length of the array into your function.

A comment: you still havne't given enough information to make a good assessment as to what function2 does and how you are trying to obtain the length of the array. Without showing this, you won't get good answers.

Edit: In gcc, this prints 4 for me. always. I repeat; without more info that you are, for some reason, gaurding like it's your grandchild in a fight with a wild animal, your problem will not be answered.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int Myfunc2(int array[])
{
   int length = 0;
   while(array[length] != 0) length++;

   return length;
}

void Init(A * st)
{
  st->a = 0;
  for(int i = 1; i < 5; i++)
  {
    st->b[i-1] = i;
  }

  st->b[4] = 0;
}

int Myfunc1()
{
     A st;
     Init(&st);
     cout << Myfunc2(st.b);
}

int main()
{
  Myfunc1();
}
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There's no need for an array defined in the same (or surrounding) scope to be static in order for sizeof to work. –  unwind Jan 21 '11 at 16:12
    
@unwind I meant "static" as in "not dynamic" not as in a static member of a class or function. Static == compile-time in this usage. –  San Jacinto Jan 21 '11 at 16:19

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