Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So let's say I have a method such as ThreadPool.QueueTask(Delegate d).

Some of these delegates need to return values, but as they cannot do this (being passed as delegates) they will need to take a value by reference as a parameter. Once the task is completed this value will have been altered, so the calling method needs to know this.

Essentially, the method passing the task to the threadpool should be waiting until it has completed.

What is the best way to do this? Should I just do Threadpool.QueueTask(Delegate d, EventWaitHandle e), or is there a more elegant way which would be obvious to people unfamiliar with that kind of thing?

Kind regards, Fugu

share|improve this question
1  
Is there any reason that you can't use the TPL to do this? If that's available to you, I can propose a good solution. –  Andrew Anderson Jan 21 '11 at 15:51
    
What is the TPL? –  Fugu Jan 21 '11 at 15:55
    
Task Parallel Library. Should be available to you in .NET 4.0 - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd537609.aspx –  Andrew Anderson Jan 21 '11 at 15:57
    
Yes, unfortunately .NET 4.0 is not available to me at this time. I have had to write a custom threadpool until I am able to use it, this has taken less time than it would have to wait. Such is life, I had heard that 4.0 would have solved my problems :) –  Fugu Jan 21 '11 at 15:58
    
@Fugu It seems odd that your method is blocked until the task completes. What's the advantage of using a thread pool if the caller is blocked? –  Tim Lloyd Jan 21 '11 at 16:15
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use a ManualResetEvent:

public void TaskStartMethod()
{
    ManualResetEvent waitHandle = new ManualResetEvent(false);

    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(o=>
    {
        // Perform the task here

        // Signal when done
        waitHandle.Signal();
    });

    // Wait until the task is complete
    waitHandle.WaitOne();
}

Essentially, the method passing the task to the threadpool should be waiting until it has completed.

The above code does that, but now I have a question: if your method is waiting for the task to be completed, then why do you even bother to perform the task on a separate thread? In other words, what you're describing is sequential execution of code rather than parallel, so the use of the ThradPool is pointless.

Alternately, you might might want to use a separate delegate as a callback:

public delegate void OnTaskCompleteDelegate(Result someResult);

public void TaskStartMethod()
{
    OnTaskCompleteDelegate callback = new OnTaskCompleteDelegate(OnTaskComplete);
    ThradPool.QueueUserWorkItem(o=>
    {
        // Perform the task

        // Use the callback to notify that the
        // task is complete. You can send a result
        // or whatever you find necessary.
        callback(new Result(...));
    });

}

public void OnTaskComplete(Result someResult)
{
    // Process the result
}

Update (1/24/2011): You might not even need the callback delegate, you can just directly call OnTaskComplete and that should do the job too:

public void TaskStartMethod()
{
    ThradPool.QueueUserWorkItem(o=>
    {
        // Perform the task

        // Call the method when the task is complete
        OnTaskComplete(new Result(...));
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
I use callbacks successfully for this very thing. You can also use callbacks to report progress, with the main thread sending go/no-go signal back through the callback's return argument. –  Ed Power Jan 21 '11 at 17:40
add comment

Depends on how you are doing it. To me it sounds a little like you have thread A putting a single task on the thread pool, then waiting for that to finish. That does not sound very helpful. If you are putting one task on the thread pool and waiting, just do it in your own thread.

But that is probably not what your doing!

I can see two possible good ways for using the thread pool. Thread A has multiple things that it wants to kick off in parallel, and then wait for them all to finish. In this case you need to store a handle to all of the tasks (or a result class), so you can wait for them all to finish. You can make use of semiphores or various synchronization tools (I don't do c# specifically) to avoid having to busy poll.

Another way is to use a callback at the end of the task. Thread A kicks off the task on the thread pool, then exists. The task has a handle back to the class that kicked it off, and calls a callback type function when it is completed to do finalisation type stuff.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.