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imagine an array like this

[
"A definition 1: this is the definition text",
"A definition 2: this is some other definition text",
"B definition 3: this could be: the definition text"
]

I want to end up with the following hash

hash = {
:A => ["A definition 1", "this is the definition text", "A definition 2", "this is some other definition text"], 
:B => ["B definition 3", "this could be: the definition text"]
}

I'm creating a glossary, with a hash of each letter of the alphabet with definition arrays.

I'm pretty new to Ruby so what I have looks really inelegant and I'm struggling on the split regex of the line on the colon so that the 3rd line only splits on the first occurrence.

Thanks!

Edit Here's what I have so far

def self.build(lines)
    alphabet = Hash.new()

    lines.each do |line|
      strings = line.split(/:/)
      letter = strings[0][0,1].upcase
      alphabet[letter] = Array.new if alphabet[letter].nil?
      alphabet[letter] << strings[0]
      alphabet[letter] << strings[1..(strings.size-1)].join.strip
    end
    alphabet
  end
share|improve this question
1  
To learn how to use split() on only the first occurrence, see my answer, or rather see the documentation for split and look at the limit parameter. – Phrogz Jan 21 '11 at 17:03
    
bah thanks, that limit param has eluded me till now... – jenson-button-event Jan 21 '11 at 17:15
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Provided raw_definitions is your input:

sorted_defs = Hash.new{|hash, key| hash[key] = Array.new;}

raw_definitions.each do |d|
  d.match(/^([a-zA-Z])(.*?):(.*)$/)
  sorted_defs[$1.upcase]<<$1+$2
  sorted_defs[$1.upcase]<<$3.strip
end
share|improve this answer
    
nice pretty much worked, $2 is missing $1, can u make the 2nd match start at the beginning again? – jenson-button-event Jan 21 '11 at 16:32
    
Yeah that is why I added $1+$2 try that out. This revision produces the correct output, tested in IRB. – Michael Papile Jan 21 '11 at 16:33

Just for fun, here's a purely-functional alternative:

defs = [
  "A definition 1: this is the definition text",
  "A definition 2: this is some other definition text",
  "B definition 3: this could be: the definition text"
]

hash = Hash[
  defs.group_by{ |s| s[0].to_sym }.map do |sym,strs|
    [ sym, strs.map{ |s| s[2..-1].split(/\s*:\s*/,2) }.flatten ]
  end
]

require 'pp'
pp hash
#=> {:A=>
#=>   ["definition 1",
#=>    "this is the definition text",
#=>    "definition 2",
#=>    "this is some other definition text"],
#=>  :B=>["definition 3", "this could be: the definition text"]}

And a not-purely-functional variation with the same results:

hash = defs.group_by{ |s| s[0].to_sym }.tap do |h|
  h.each do |sym,strs|
    h[sym] = strs.map{ |s| s[2..-1].split(/\s*:\s*/,2) }.flatten
  end 
end

Note that these solutions only work in Ruby 1.9 due to the use of s[0].to_sym; to work in 1.8.7 you would have to change this to s[0,1].to_sym. To make the first solution work in 1.8.6 you would further have to replace Hash[ xxx ] with Hash[ *xxx.flatten ]

share|improve this answer
    
breaks my noggin reading it, but +1 for showing a pretty damn cool way – jenson-button-event Jan 21 '11 at 17:09
    
That is an interesting solution using the nuances of the ruby language. Thanks for sharing! – Michael Papile Jan 21 '11 at 17:37

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