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It seems I don't understand the concept of userstate in a backgroundworker. I am encountering a problem in an application I'm working on and I need an explanation for why something is happening that I didn't expect.

I have built a demo app to reproduce the issue more simply:

public class Tester
{
    private BackgroundWorker _worker = new BackgroundWorker();

    public void performTest()
    {
        Tester tester = new Tester();
        tester.crunchSomeNumbers((obj, arg) =>
        {
            WorkerArgument userState = arg.UserState as WorkerArgument;
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Progress: {0}; Calculation result: {1}", arg.ProgressPercentage, userState.CalculationResult));
        });
    }

    public void crunchSomeNumbers(Action<object,ProgressChangedEventArgs> onProgressChanged)
    {
        _worker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(worker_DoWork);
        _worker.ProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(onProgressChanged);
        _worker.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
        _worker.RunWorkerAsync(new WorkerArgument { CalculationResult=-1, BaseNumber = 10 });
    }

    void worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        BackgroundWorker worker = sender as BackgroundWorker;
        WorkerArgument arg = e.Argument as WorkerArgument;

        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            // calculate total with basenumber
            double result = arg.BaseNumber * (i * 10);
            arg.CalculationResult = result;
            worker.ReportProgress(i * 10, arg);
        }
    }

    public class WorkerArgument
    {
        public int BaseNumber { get; set; }
        public double CalculationResult { get; set; }
    }
}

If you run this code in a console App:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Tester tester = new Tester();
        tester.performTest();

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

This is the result:

http://img684.imageshack.us/img684/1509/bgwproblem.png

What I don't understand is why the calculation result is always the same while you can clearly see that it should be different on each calculation run in the forloop of the DoWork method.

share|improve this question
    
This looks like a test-case error. Don't use/test a backgroundworker in a Console App. This runs single-threaded. –  Henk Holterman Jan 21 '11 at 17:24
1  
What is wrong with running background threads in a Console App. Just as useful as any other UI to have background threads. –  btlog Jan 21 '11 at 19:17
    
@btlog: Please read. Nothing wrong with threads, but a Bgw needs a messagepump. –  Henk Holterman Jan 22 '11 at 13:38
    
@Henk That isn't correct. BackgroundWorker has nothing to do with a message pump. Essentially it is just wrapping a thread providing some event hooks. Sure there is some functionality to allow easy use on the windows form designer. Easy to test, create a console app on the above code and output Thread.CurrentThread.IsBackground in the method performTest and worker_DoWork. One will be false, the other true. The true means a second thread has spun up and there is no message pump in a console app. –  btlog Jan 25 '11 at 16:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are two problems:

1) Loop is executed before first event handler executed You can see it, if you freeze background worker thread execution after call to ReportProgress.

arg.CalculationResult = result;
worker.ReportProgress(i * 10, arg);
Thread.Sleep(500);

2) You are using one instance of WorkerArgument - so, when event handler is executed it has current WorkerArgument value, not that one which was when event was raised. Too see this just pass new instance of argument when you raise events.

worker.ReportProgress(i * 10, new WorkerArgument(){ CalculationResult = result });
share|improve this answer
2  
I don't think this is a closure issue as the expectation is that the same variable gets modified. Closure issues tend to exhibit the unintended use of the same variable. –  btlog Jan 21 '11 at 16:29
    
+1 I assume I wouldn't be breaking certain rules by returning a new instance of the WorkerArgument everytime so I used your solution and it does work. Thanks for your help and solution! I understand it now :-) –  Peter Jan 22 '11 at 9:55
    
BTW You can just pass simple base number to RunWorkerAsync, and return simple result without using WorkerArgument: _worker.RunWorkerAsync(baseNumber); worker.ReportProgress(i * 10, result); –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 22 '11 at 10:11

You assumption is that the events are raised and executed before the next iteration of the loop. Unfortunately this is not correct.

What is happening is that your for loop is completing before the first event is executed. So userState.CalculationResult is at 900 before the call to Console.WriteLine. You if you change for for top to

for (int i = 0; < 1000000; i++)

You should see that there is an increase in numbers, but it gets to the maximum number before all the events have executed.

Another way is to put a Console.WriteLine before the call to worker.ReportProgress. You will see the order of completion of the for loop being different from the event report. It won't be as complete on the first event code output as the Console.WriteLine is a really slow call and massively slows down the execution of the for loop.

One of the exciting issues to remember with multi threading is calling events is non blocking.

share|improve this answer
    
The writeline is a good idea. Also report ThreadId, my guess is this whole thing runs single-threaded. –  Henk Holterman Jan 21 '11 at 17:36
    
+1 This explains the problem very accurately. Thank you for the information! –  Peter Jan 22 '11 at 9:54

I can't spot the problem outright, but it's probably about anonymous methods and variable pinning. Try narrowing it down by rewriting each anonymous method or lambda as a proper method and see if the problem persists.

share|improve this answer
    
This has nothing to do with using anonymous methods. –  Peter Jan 22 '11 at 9:56

You'll want to call the worker that was passed in:

void worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    BackgroundWorker this_worker = sender as BackgroundWorker;
    WorkerArgument arg = e.Argument as WorkerArgument;

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        // calculate total with basenumber
        double result = arg.BaseNumber * (i * 10);
        arg.CalculationResult = result;
        this_worker.ReportProgress(i * 10, arg);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What is the difference between this and using the class variable defining the worker? There is only one Background worker created in the code. Your example is essentially the same thing as this_worker is the same object as worker. Or am I missing a sublety? –  btlog Jan 21 '11 at 16:31
    
@btlog - The difference is the OP is using the BackgroundWorker from the main thread. DoWork is run on a different thread and shouldnt be calling it. I dont think it fixes the issue here, but its definitely a problem. –  SwDevMan81 Jan 21 '11 at 16:41
    
I am not sure that is an issue worker is just an instantiated object that lives in shared memory. Shouldn't matter what thread is using it. –  btlog Jan 21 '11 at 16:44
    
Accessing/Using an object across threads without synchronization will end up causing you a lot of problems. –  SwDevMan81 Jan 21 '11 at 16:53
    
You guys are right and I've updated the code. The problem is the same however. –  Peter Jan 21 '11 at 17:05

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