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I realize that, strictly speaking, this is not subclassing the array type, but will this work in the way one might expect, or am I still going to run into some issues with .length and the like? Are there any drawbacks that I would not have if normal subclassing were an option?

        function Vector()
        {
            var vector = [];
            vector.sum = function()
            {
                sum = 0.0;
                for(i = 0; i < this.length; i++)
                {
                    sum += this[i];
                }
                return sum;
            }            
            return vector;
        }

        v = Vector();
        v.push(1); v.push(2);
        console.log(v.sum());
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How many of these Vector arrays you planning on instantiating? 2? Hundreds? –  Roatin Marth Jan 21 '11 at 16:16
    
You forgot a var. var vector = [];. –  Thai Jan 21 '11 at 16:17
    
More than thousands. –  shino Jan 21 '11 at 16:17
    
Thanks, Thai; fixed. –  shino Jan 21 '11 at 16:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd wrap an array inside a proper vector type like this:

window.Vector = function Vector() {
  this.data = [];
}

Vector.prototype.push = function push() {
  Array.prototype.push.apply(this.data, arguments);
}

Vector.prototype.sum = function sum() {
  for(var i = 0, s=0.0, len=this.data.length; i < len; s += this.data[i++]);
  return s;
}

var vector1 = new Vector();
vector1.push(1); vector1.push(2);
console.log(vector1.sum());

Alternatively you can build new prototype functions on arrays and then just use normal arrays.

If you are consistent with naming the arrays so they all start with a lowercase v for example or something similar that clearly mark them aw vector and not normal arrays, and you do the same on the vector specific prototype functions, then it should be fairly easy to keep track of.

Array.prototype.vSum = function vSum() {
  for(var i = 0, s=0.0, len=this.length; i < len; s += this[i++]);
  return s;
}

var vector1 = [];
vector1.push(1); vector1.push(2);
console.log(vector1.vSum());
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Looks like this will work best for me; thanks. You get the cookie. :) –  shino Jan 21 '11 at 18:24
    
Keep in mind that building new prototype functions on Array will add those methods to all arrays created. This may not be something that you want so it's something to take into consideration. –  Gabe H Mar 11 at 20:36
    
This does not, however, let you call vector1[0] and get back 1, unfortunately. –  Michael Scott Cuthbert Jun 4 at 16:06

EDIT -- I originally wrote that you could subclass an Array just like any other object, which was wrong. Learn something new every day. Here is a good discussion

http://perfectionkills.com/how-ecmascript-5-still-does-not-allow-to-subclass-an-array/

In this case, would composition work better? i.e. just create a Vector object, and have it backed by an array. This seems to be the path you are on, you just need to add the push and any other methods to the prototype.

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Beat me to it, but yeah, I'd rather create an object than risk messing up how something else interacts with it. –  Robert Jan 21 '11 at 16:16
1  
I'd like to be able to access array elements with the [] notation. Is this old news: dean.edwards.name/weblog/2006/11/hooray ? –  shino Jan 21 '11 at 16:18
    
Think you forgot the "script"... –  Roatin Marth Jan 21 '11 at 16:18
1  
@shino: that is not old news, no. It's still very much a problem. –  Roatin Marth Jan 21 '11 at 16:20
1  
@shino, see this stackoverflow.com/questions/4650513/… –  hvgotcodes Jan 21 '11 at 16:26

Just another example of the wrapper. Having some fun with .bind.

var _Array = function _Array() {
    if ( !( this instanceof _Array ) ) {
        return new _Array();
    };
};

_Array.prototype.push = function() {
    var apContextBound = Array.prototype.push,
        pushItAgainst = Function.prototype.apply.bind( apContextBound );

    pushItAgainst( this, arguments );
};

_Array.prototype.pushPushItRealGood = function() {
    var apContextBound = Array.prototype.push,
        pushItAgainst = Function.prototype.apply.bind( apContextBound );

    pushItAgainst( this, arguments );
};

_Array.prototype.typeof = (function() { return ( Object.prototype.toString.call( [] ) ); }());
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@hvgotcodes answer has an awesome link. I just wanted to summerize the conclusion here.

Wrappers. Prototype chain injection

This seems to be the best method to extend array from the article.

wrappers can be used ... in which object’s prototype chain is augmented, rather than object itself.

function SubArray() {
  var arr = [ ];
  arr.push.apply(arr, arguments);
  arr.__proto__ = SubArray.prototype;
  return arr;
}
SubArray.prototype = new Array;

// Add custom functions here to SubArray.prototype.
SubArray.prototype.last = function() {
  return this[this.length - 1];
};

var sub = new SubArray(1, 2, 3);

sub instanceof SubArray; // true
sub instanceof Array; // true

Unfortunally for me, this method uses arr.__proto__, unsupported in IE 8-, a browser I have to support.

Wrappers. Direct property injection.

This method is a little slower than the above, but works in IE 8-.

Wrapper approach avoids setting up inheritance or emulating length/indices relation. Instead, a factory-like function can create a plain Array object, and then augment it directly with any custom methods. Since returned object is an Array one, it maintains proper length/indices relation, as well as [[Class]] of “Array”. It also inherits from Array.prototype, naturally.

function makeSubArray() {
  var arr = [ ];
  arr.push.apply(arr, arguments);

  // Add custom functions here to arr.
  arr.last = function() {
    return this[this.length - 1];
  };
  return arr;
}

var sub = makeSubArray(1, 2, 3);
sub instanceof Array; // true

sub.length; // 3
sub.last(); // 3
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