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This is for Android which is a mobile device. Is a switch statement really more efficient? It takes more lines of code,, but that seems to be the more common approach.

public void onClickWithSwitch(View v) {
   switch(v.getId()) {
       case R.id.buttonA:
           buttonA();
           break;
       case R.id.buttonB:
           buttonB();
           break;
       case R.id.buttonC:
           buttonC();
   }
}

public void onClickWithIf(View v) {
   int id = v.getId();
   if(id == R.id.buttonA)
       buttonA();
   else if (id == R.id.buttonB)
       buttonB();
   else if (id == R.id.buttonC)
       buttonC();
}

So switch takes 10 lines and if takes 7. Why would switch be more common?

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2  
You're asking the wrong question. And both are the wrong solution in many cases. –  delnan Jan 21 '11 at 16:36
1  
Generally switch is more efficient than if. Also it can be clearer to show all the comparisons are against the same id. The number of lines of code is a poor indication of efficiency. (you can put your whole program onto one line ut it won't help ;) ) –  Peter Lawrey Jan 21 '11 at 16:38
1  
@delnan I don't find that to be a beginner question. You are suggesting applying polymorphism to avoid implementing a switch statement. This would entail creating a subclass for every single clickable element in a ui. That seems far more inefficient then writing a switch or if statement in both code complexity and runtime. Perhaps you didn't notice this is a UI framework? –  Nick Campion Jan 21 '11 at 16:57
1  
@delnan there are significant performance considerations. Since the Android SDK defines the only parameter to the onClick callback as a View, you'd have no choice but to delineate between the different classes using introspection and a significant if/else statement of instanceof methods. On top of this, if you don't have multiple classes (multiple types/objects) then there is no reason to have switch either. If he was writing the entire framework, making a polymorphic onClick would be an approach to be considered, but given the constraints of the SDK, it makes very little sense. –  Nick Campion Jan 21 '11 at 17:24
1  
@Nick: The Android SDK is that constrianted? WTF, but point taken. –  delnan Jan 21 '11 at 17:26
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The reason languages have switch statements is to allow the compiler to generate a jump table, which is fast if it's large, because at run-time it can get to the desired code in O(1) rather than O(N) time.

It's only helpful speed-wise if there are many cases and the code to execute in each case does not take much time, and the program spends much percentage of time in this code at all.

Other than that it's purely a matter of taste.

There is no relationship between number of code lines and speed. What matters is the kind of assembly language code that's generated, which I'd encourage you to get familiar with.

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Unless your sequence of ifs/cases is truly vast, I don't think it matters. With the switch statement, it's more clear what's going on. The only downside is all the break statements and the potential to miss one, but a static analyzer should catch that.

Best would be a map keyed by the id or some clever use of subclassing

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NetBeans does catch missing breaks and put in a warning for me. –  George Bailey Jan 21 '11 at 16:39
3  
+1, IMO, "it's more clear what's going on" is the key. –  Kirk Woll Jan 21 '11 at 16:40
    
missing breaks are the result of horrible programming practices (much like what is seen in the original post). If you don't automatically include a break immediately after your case, then you get what's coming to you. –  KevinDTimm Jan 21 '11 at 16:43
1  
@George Bailey: adding a break at the end of the last case is a good idea, just in case someone adds a new case at the end and doesn't notice that it's missing. –  sblundy Jan 21 '11 at 16:47
1  
Absolutely yes. One of the benefits of the switch is that it provides the capability to 'fall through'. It is also one of the greatest drawbacks. Any 'missing' break statement should be documented in the code; this will stop the next developer from 'fixing' your code by inserting the missing break(s). –  KevinDTimm Jan 21 '11 at 16:47
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"More efficient" is a vague concept, because there are so many ways to measure it. I suppose most people think of execution time. On the other hand, most people don't think of memory efficiency. A switch statement with widely spaced test values can be a horrible memory hog, unless the compiler is smart enough to re-interpret it as an if-else chain.

There's a lot to be said, as well, for programming efficiency, including maintenance and readability. As sblundy noted, a switch statement can be clearer about the programmer's intent than an if-else chain. Comments can counterbalance that, but that requires more work for the programmer and there's also the risk that the comments and code don't match (particularly after a few maintenance cycles).

I imagine that most people follow whatever style they have been taught (or told to follow), without thinking about it too much. The rest of the time, I think most decisions about switch vs. if-else are based on which one best matches the programmer's thinking at the moment the code is being generated.

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You asked: Is a switch statement really more efficient?

Anybody claiming to have a definitive and general answer on this question, talks nonsense. There is exactly one way to find out which is faster in your case: Use a proper micro-benchmarking framework on your target plattform with your complete software, not a simplified example. If that reveals a measurable and statistically signifanct difference I'd be interested in hearing about it. I doubt you'll find any measurable difference for a real program.

Therefore, I would strictly go for readability.

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While we're on the subject, nobody mentioned that you should always have a default line in switch statement. Usually you want to throw an exception, but at least you should assert and/or log the error.

This is just good basic defensive programming. It alerts you that you have a programming error if you later add another button (in this case).

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Actually, a default case is often a bad idea when switching on an enum. It prevents the ide from warning when you have missed a case (assuming that you have turned on this warning, which is a good idea). Much better in those situations to explicitly list all the enum cases (if any) for which you want to do the default stuff. –  Ted Hopp Feb 20 at 21:07
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