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I am writing a small matrix library in C++ for matrix operations. However my compiler complains, where before it did not. This code was left on a shelf for 6 months and in between I upgraded my computer from debian etch to lenny (g++ (Debian 4.3.2-1.1) 4.3.2 ) however I have the same problem on a Ubuntu system with the same g++.

Here is the relevant part of my matrix class:

namespace Math
{
    class Matrix
    {
    public:

        [...]

        friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& stream, const Matrix& matrix);
    }
}

And the "implementation":

using namespace Math;

std::ostream& Matrix::operator <<(std::ostream& stream, const Matrix& matrix) {

    [...]

}

This is the error given by the compiler:

matrix.cpp:459: error: 'std::ostream& Math::Matrix::operator<<(std::ostream&, const Math::Matrix&)' must take exactly one argument

I'm a bit confused by this error, but then again my C++ has gotten a bit rusty after doing lots of Java those 6 months. :-)

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How is overloading << operator any better than creating a display member function() for that class? Is it used just because it looks cooler? Or is it faster becuase it uses ostream –  Tyler Durden Jan 9 at 16:23
    
@TylerDurden It adds to readability. myMatrix.display(); cout << " "; myOtherMatrix.display(); is sillier than cout << myMatrix << " " << myOtherMatrix; But it really depends on how you're intending the objects to be displayed. –  josaphatv May 8 at 3:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 51 down vote accepted

You have declared your function as friend. It's not a member of the class. You should remove Matrix:: from the implementation. friend means that the specified function (which is not a member of the class) can access private member variables. The way you implemented the function is like an instance method for Matrix class which is wrong.

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I knew it was something stupid, thanks! –  Matthias van der Vlies Jan 24 '09 at 16:42
3  
And you should also declare it inside the Math namespace (not just with an using namespace Math). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 23 '09 at 21:35

Just telling you about one other possibility: I like using friend definitions for that:

namespace Math
{
    class Matrix
    {
    public:

        [...]

        friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& stream, const Matrix& matrix) {
            [...]
        }
    };
}

The function will be automatically targeted into the surrounding namespace Math (even though its definition appears within the scope of that class) but will not be visible unless you call operator<< with a Matrix object which will make argument dependent lookup find that operator definition. That can sometimes help with ambiguous calls, since it's invisible for argument types other than Matrix. When writing its definition, you can also refer directly to names defined in Matrix and to Matrix itself, without qualifying the name with some possibly long prefix and providing template parameters like Math::Matrix<TypeA, N>.

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Thanks for this answer it was very useful for me. –  tommyk Dec 9 '10 at 10:41
1  
I think this answer is better than the accepted. Thanks! –  PolyMesh Dec 17 '13 at 20:29

To add to Mehrdad answer ,

namespace Math
{
    class Matrix
    {
       public:

       [...]


    }   
    std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& stream, const Math::Matrix& matrix);
}

In your implementation

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& stream, 
                     const Math::Matrix& matrix) {
    matrix.print(stream); //assuming you define print for matrix 
    return stream;
 }
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I don't understand why is this a down vote, this clarifies that you can declare operator to be in the namespace and not even as a friend and how you can possibly declare the operator. –  kal Jan 24 '09 at 20:28
1  
Mehrdad answer did not have any snippet of code so I just added what might work by moving it outside the class in the namespace itself. –  kal Jan 24 '09 at 20:30
    
I understand your point, I only looked at your second snippet. But now I see you took the operator out of the class. Thanks for the suggestion. –  Matthias van der Vlies Jan 24 '09 at 20:32
3  
Not only it is out of the class, but it is properly defined inside the Math namespace. Also it has the added advantage (maybe not for a Matrix, but with other classes) that 'print' can be virtual and thus printing will happen at the most derived level of inheritance. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 23 '09 at 21:45

Assuming that we're talking about overloading operator << for all classes derived from std::ostream to handle the Matrix class (and not overloading << for Matrix class), it makes more sense to declare the overload function outside the Math namespace in the header.

Use a friend function only if the functionality cannot be achieved via the public interfaces.

Matrix.h

namespace Math { 
      class Matrix { 
       ...
       };  
}
std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream&, const Math::Matrix&);

Note that the operator overload is declared outside the namespace.

Matrix.cpp

using namespace Math;
using namespace std;

ostream& operator<< (ostream& os, const Matrix& obj) {
       os << obj.getXYZ() << obj.getABC() << "\n";
       return os;
}       

On the other hand if your overload function does need to be made a friend i.e needs access to private and protected members

Math.h

namespace Math {
     class Matrix {
          public:
             friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& , const Matrix&);
     };
}

You need to enclose the function definition with a namespace block instead of just "using namespace Math;"

Matrix.cpp

using namespace Math;
using namespace std;

namespace Math {
   ostream& operator<< (ostream& os, const Matrix& obj) {
         os << obj.XYZ << obj.ABC << "\n";
         return os;
  }                 
}
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