Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Question:

Which of these is the proper way to nest the <h1> and <article> tags, and what is your reasoning behind it?

Choice A:

<article>
    <h1>Some Title</h1>
    <p>Here's some text and whatnot.</p>
    <p>Here's another paragraph filled with other text and other whatnots.</p>
</article>

Choice B:

<div class="post">
    <h1>Here's a Really Awesome Title</h1>
    <article>
        <p>Here's a paragraph with text and whatnot.</p>
        <p>And here's another paragraph. I think this one is pretty awesome too.</p>
    </article>
</div>

Opinions seem mixed about this, and I'm not 100% which is the correct answer.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

both are fine

@David Dorward has a great answer, and I was going to comment to expand on it, but when I realized my comment was getting too long I decided I'd just add my own answer instead.

The h# elements semantically belong to their parents.

This h1 is the primary header for the page

<body>
  <h1>Some text</h1>
</body>

While this h1 is the primary header for the article

<body>
  <article>
    <h1>Some text</h1>
  </article>
</body>

This allows us to expand the usage of h# elements in meaningful ways as follows:

<body>
  <h1>Blag Tottle</h1>
  <article>
    <h1>Article 1 Title</h1>
    <p>Lorem ipsum etc</p>
  </article>
  <article>
    <h1>Article 2 Title</h1>
    <p>Lorem ipsum etc</p>
  </article>
</body>

Now you may want to separate your article heading some more, which is a perfect application of the header element:

<body>
  <h1>Blag Tottle</h1>
  <article>
    <header>
      <h1>Article 1 Title</h1>
      <span class="author">And not a mouse</span>
    </header>
    <p>Lorem ipsum etc</p>
  </article>
  <article>
    <header>
      <h1>Article 2 Title</h1>
      <span class="author">Somebody</span>
    </header>
    <p>Lorem ipsum etc</p>
  </article>
</body>
share|improve this answer
    
This is a very comprehensive answer! Don't forget that instead of putting <header><h1>Blah</h1><span>Bloopity</span></header>, you could also use <hgroup><h1>Blah</h1><h3>Author</h3></hgroup> to delimit your headings. –  Nick Anderegg Jan 21 '11 at 21:50
    
@Nick Anderegg, I would say that's a semantic misuse of h3 to be used as an author, although if it were a sub-title the hgroup would be applicable. To be honest, it really makes very little difference overall. –  zzzzBov Jan 21 '11 at 21:52
1  
Sorry, that was a typo, I meant <h2></h2>. But I was trying to point out that if you are using multiple things under in a header for an article, one good option is <hgroup></hgroup>. I would use a <span></span> for the author, however. –  Nick Anderegg Jan 21 '11 at 21:58
    
<hgroup> has been removed from the HTML5 specification –  mchlslzmnn Mar 17 at 15:19

Headings are scoped to article elements (and other sectioning elements). The heading should be inside the article to which it applies.

The first element of heading content in an element of sectioning content represents the heading for that section

http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/sections.html#headings-and-sections

Choice A is better if it is the heading for that article.

Choice B is better if it is the heading for all the articles that follow it.

share|improve this answer

I'm using first option. Because , article's mean is a part of external content . So this content should have a header.

share|improve this answer
    
have you ever heard of w3fools? –  zzzzBov Jan 21 '11 at 21:48

Choice A. The chapter headings (which H1 is too) are part of you article.

share|improve this answer

I'd say that the heading is part of the article.

This is really down to personal taste as far as I can tell. You won't get a right or wrong answer as long as you're writing valid HTML5.

share|improve this answer

Headers that talk about the article (meta-headers) should be out of <article>, headers that are part of the article (chapters, for example) should be in <article>.

All of that just IMHO.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.