Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a better way programmatically using perl to track the timing of a unix process (start time, end time)??

For example, I have a perl script that launches a unix command using system(). I print the timestamp before the system() and after.

My log of the start time and end time are the same. I know for sure that when the process completes its a matter of minutes, so its not accurate.

Here's my code thus far:

my $dt  = strftime('%Y%m%d', localtime(time));
my $dt2 = strftime('%Y%m%d-%H:%M:%S', localtime(time)); 
my @tbls = qx(mysql -u foo -pmypw --database $dbsrc -h $node -ss -e "show tables");

open (CRLOG, ">dump-$dt.log") || die "cannot append";
foreach my $tbls (@tbls)
{
   chomp $tbls;
   print CRLOG "TIME START => $dt2\n";
   my $crfile = qq{mysql -u foo -pmypw --database $dbsrc -h $node.test.com -ss -e "SELECT 'a','b','c' UNION SELECT 1,2,3 FROM $tbls"| tr "\t" ",">$node-$tbls.$dt.csv};   system($crfile); 
   print CRLOG "COMMAND => $crfile\n";
   print CRLOG "TIME END => $dt2\n";
}; 
close (CRLOG);
share|improve this question
    
You're fetching $dt2 before calling the command, not after. –  Ether Jan 22 '11 at 17:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

$dt2 is a constant, but it looks like you want it to recompute the timestamp every time it is used. For that purpose, you should use a function.

sub dt2 {
    return strftime('%Y%m%d-%H:%M:%S', localtime(time))
}

...

open (CRLOG, ">dump-$dt.log") || die "cannot append";
foreach my $tbls (@tbls)
{
   chomp $tbls;
   print CRLOG "TIME START => ", &dt2, "\n";
   my $crfile = qq{mysql -u foo -pmypw ...};
   system($crfile); 
   print CRLOG "COMMAND => $crfile\n";
   print CRLOG "TIME END => ", &dt2, "\n";
}; 
close (CRLOG);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! this is cool. it works well! on my sample test of small table, i can see the secs change. –  jdamae Jan 21 '11 at 23:27
1  
If you need more granularity, also try use Time::HiRes qw/time/ –  mfontani Jan 22 '11 at 12:58

Have you tried using the "time" command to time the command execution?

http://www.computerhope.com/unix/utime.htm

So in your perl script it would be something like this to capture the output:

$time_me = `/usr/bin/time $my_command`;

Then parse the $time_me variable to get the values.

share|improve this answer
    
no, I haven't tried this, but thanks! i will check this out too as an option. –  jdamae Jan 21 '11 at 23:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.