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Hey Guys, I'm trying to builda media playlist that can advance the credits, play the video and change the title on thumb-hover, end of video and on next/prev click. So I need to write some functions that can then be called together. So like this:

    function showBox()
    {
        $(this).parents('.container').find('.box').show();
    };

    function hideBox()
    {
        $(this).parents('.container').find('.box').hide();
    };

    $('a').hover(
        function()
        {
            showBox();
        },
        function()
        {
            hideBox();
        }
    );

The problem is that $(this) does not carry through to the functions from the .hover. How do I do this?

Thanks for the help!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The this will carry through if you just do:

$('a').hover(showBox,hideBox);

EDIT: To address the question in the comment, this will work for any function you assign as an event handler. Doesn't matter if it is an anonymous function or a named one.

This:

$('a').click(function() { 
    alert( this.tagName ); 
});

...is the same as:

function alertMe() {
    alert( this.tagName );
}

$('a').click( alertMe );

...or this:

function alertMe() {
    alert( this.tagName );
}

$('a').bind('click', alertMe );
share|improve this answer
    
Really? That would be the best way I think. Would that work for .click and .bind events too? –  Drew Baker Jan 22 '11 at 0:07
    
@Drew: Absolutely. :o) It is simply assigning your functions directly as the handlers, and anytime a handler is called, the value of this in the handler will be the element that received the event. –  user113716 Jan 22 '11 at 0:09
1  
@Drew: No downsides. This is the simplest approach. The solution from @Šime Vidas is effectively the same, except that he's replacing your named functions with anonymous ones. I assume you want them named for a reason. Frankly, I think it is a good idea to use named functions in lieu of anonymous ones. Adds clarity. Not sure why it wasn't suggested. The plugin example that another user gave seems to only add complexity and overhead without any real benefit. The solutions that pass on some form of this as a parameter are also adding overhead without benefit. –  user113716 Jan 22 '11 at 0:19
1  
@DrewBaker Please accept patrickdw's answer here as the correct one; I'm unsure whether to delete mine or not, as it is helpful to learn about plug-ins and the ability to extend jQuery objects. This answer is, however, clearly the correct one. I'll be editing my answer to note this. –  Phrogz Jan 22 '11 at 14:46
1  
@DrewBaker Bah, silly me. $('a').click(function(){ doThis.call(this); andThis.call(this); }); Or if you need the event object: $('a').click(function(e){ doThis.call(this,e); andThis.call(this,e); }); –  Phrogz Jan 25 '11 at 0:44

Per @patrickdw's answer, jQuery sets the scope of a callback for an event to the DOM element upon which the event was fired. For example, see the eventObject parameter in the documentation for the click() handler.

My original answer (below) is useful when you want to create a jQuery plug-in so that you may invoke your own custom methods on jQuery objects and have the jQuery object set as this during execution. However, it is not the correct and simple answer to the original question.

// Within a plug-in, `this` is already a jQuery object, not DOM reference
$.fn.showBox = function(){ this.parents('.container').find('.box').show(); };
$.fn.hideBox = function(){ this.parents('.container').find('.box').hide(); };
$('a').hover(
  function(){ $(this).showBox() },
  function(){ $(this).hideBox() }
);

Edit: Or, if (as suggested) you want to add only one name to the ~global jQuery method namespace:

$.fn.myBox = function(cmd){
  this.closest('.container').find('.box')[cmd]();
};

$('a').hover(
  function(){ $(this).myBox('show') },
  function(){ $(this).myBox('hide') }
);

Or more generally:

$.fn.myBox = function(cmd){
  switch(cmd){
    case 'foo':
      ...
    break;
    case 'bar':
      ...
    break;
  }
  return this;
};

For more information, see the jQuery Plugin Authoring Guide.

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+1 - This is another great approach which doesn't require the closure. Good answer. –  g.d.d.c Jan 21 '11 at 23:45
1  
The nice, jQuery way of doing it. Though for the record, guidelines for plugins usually request a single namespace incursion. So .theBox('open') / .theBox('close') would be more to regs. –  Orbling Jan 21 '11 at 23:47
1  
Excellent point, @Orbling. I think that guideline is wholly sensible when wrapping up one's own code for a plugin, but perhaps violable for one-offs in a standalone script. I've updated my answer to show one way of doing this. –  Phrogz Jan 21 '11 at 23:50
    
@Phrogz: Aye, I quite agree. As the question looked like it was liable to be a part of a much more substantial endeavour I thought I'd throw it in. –  Orbling Jan 21 '11 at 23:52
    
This is great guys. I'm going to be doing a lot of functions (like nextCredit, prevCredit, nextTitle, prevTitle) so how would I deal with the namespace then? –  Drew Baker Jan 21 '11 at 23:58

In Javascript you can use call() or apply() to execute a function and explicitly specify this for it:

$('a').hover(
    function()
    {
        showBox.call(this);
    },
    function()
    {
        hideBox.call(this);
    }
);

The first parameter given to call() specifies the object that this will refer to in the function. Any further parameters are used as parameters in the function call.

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You need to modify your code to something like this:

function showBox(elem)
{
    elem.parents('.container').find('.box').show();
};

function hideBox(elem)
{
    elem.parents('.container').find('.box').hide();
};

$('a').hover(
    function()
    {
        var $this = $(this);

        showBox($this);
    },
    function()
    {
        var $this = $(this);

        hideBox($this);
    }
);
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work. hover(hoverOverFn, hoverOffFn) -- perhaps move the binding outside, but I'm not really clear what the question is asking :-) –  user166390 Jan 21 '11 at 23:45
    
@pst - caught it as I re-read it, updated to properly set the variable. –  g.d.d.c Jan 21 '11 at 23:46
    
@gddc Now that there's no need to cache it, how about just showBox($(this)); –  Phrogz Jan 21 '11 at 23:48
$('a').hover(function() {
    $(this).closest('.container').find('.box').show();
}, function()  {
    $(this).closest('.container').find('.box').hide();
});
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for closest() –  Phrogz Jan 21 '11 at 23:51

Add parameters to showBox and hideBox so that they can accept the element, and then call showBox($(this)) and hideBox($(this)).

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