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I was wondering what security method everyone uses to secure a web application at bank grade if possible.

from the best of my knowledge here are the methods/technologies that i know of.

Front - End-user Section
-------------------------
SSL (128 bit encryption)
htaccess (protection against bots and using mod-rewrite to hide parameter calls)
input field cleaning
session cleaning before use
PDO access to mysql ( although oracle is better yet expensive)
not being on a shared hosting account.
using a cisco based firewall (not very familiar with these)
restricting what can be uploaded (if the site requires an upload)
blocking off directory index access with htaccess
not storing credit card information locally
encrypting user passwords with sha1 or encryption with salt 
(never could figure these out)

not using hidden input fields
turn off global variables
turn off error displays
using another file extension displayed to the user rather than php , aspx, etc.
blocking ping/requests for server/apache information and version.


backend access
-------------------
not having its access being something like /admin (if you know what i mean)
"all of the above listed for end-user"
verifying if the user who logs in exists as an admin 

rather than using mysql_real_escape_string or htmlentities to clean input fields then there is filter_input() which doesnt work that good. it kind of messes up the cleaning. so what do you guys recommend. i know some of you might be thinking this might be a bit too much but if your working on a web application that was to be hit by over 50k users where ecommerce based transactions would occur. what would you do?

thanks

ps: this is what i have in my htaccess to protect against non-friendly bots and restricting access to important files.

#=============================================================================#
#          Deny access to hidden files
#=============================================================================#
<FilesMatch "\.(htaccess|log|sh)$">
 Order Allow,Deny
 Deny from all
</FilesMatch>

#=============================================================================#
#          Deny access to evil bots / security
#=============================================================================#

RewriteBase /
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^JetCar.* [NC]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^FlashGet.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Teleport.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^NetAnts.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebZIP.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Offline.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^GetRight.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Go!Zilla.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^GoZilla.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebReaper.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^ia_archiver.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^wget.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^HTTrack.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebStripper.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebCapture.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Scooter-W3.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebCopier.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^FlashGe.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Webdupe.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^NetAnts.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Pockey.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^DiscoPump.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^InternetNinja.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^BlackWidow [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Bot\ mailto:craftbot@yahoo.com [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^ChinaClaw [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Custo [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^DISCo [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Download\ Demon [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^eCatch [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^EirGrabber [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^EmailSiphon [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^EmailWolf [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Express\ WebPictures [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^ExtractorPro [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^EyeNetIE [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^FlashGet [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^GetRight [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^GetWeb! [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Go!Zilla [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Go-Ahead-Got-It [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^GrabNet [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Grafula [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^HMView [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^HTTrack [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Image\ Stripper [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Image\ Sucker [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Indy\ Library [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^InterGET [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Internet\ Ninja [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^JetCar [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^JOC\ Web\ Spider [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^larbin [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^LeechFTP [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Mass\ Downloader [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^MIDown\ tool [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Mister\ PiX [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Navroad [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^NearSite [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^NetAnts [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^NetSpider [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Net\ Vampire [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^NetZIP [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Octopus [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Offline\ Explorer [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Offline\ Navigator [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^PageGrabber [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Papa\ Foto [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^pavuk [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^pcBrowser [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^RealDownload [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^ReGet [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^SiteSnagger [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^SmartDownload [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^SuperBot [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^SuperHTTP [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Surfbot [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^tAkeOut [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Teleport\ Pro [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^VoidEYE [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Web\ Image\ Collector [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Web\ Sucker [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebAuto [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebCopier [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebFetch [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebGo\ IS [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebLeacher [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebReaper [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebSauger [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Website\ eXtractor [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Website\ Quester [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebStripper [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebWhacker [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebZIP [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Wget [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Widow [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WWWOFFLE [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Xaldon\ WebSpider [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^GoZilla.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^WebCapture.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Webdupe.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Pockey.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^DiscoPump.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^InternetSeer.com.* [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.hostitcheap.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.bravespider.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.bigweblist.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.weblinkvalidator.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://traffixer.com* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.youradultpaysite.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.paysiteprofits.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.hotlivewebcams.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.paysiteprofits.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} FormMail.*
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^www.addresses.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.business-socket.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^www.datashaping.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://cheapweb.biz/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://traffixer.com* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.hostitcheap.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^http://www.weblinkvalidator.com/* [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} FormMail.*
RewriteRule .* - [F,L]
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just a few things to add to this nice big list:

  • remove versions disclosure information from PHP as well (very verbose) : expose_php Off

rather than using mysql_real_escape_string or htmlentities to clean input fields then there is filter_input() which doesnt work that good. it kind of messes up the cleaning. so what do you guys recommend

Well the rule is not to filter one time and get with it. The rule is to filter based on the type of the output at the time you need it.

  • When the output is the database, escape/filter for the database (mysql_real_escape and such)
  • When the output is HTML escape for HTML (htmlspecialchars)
  • When the output is CSV escape for CSV (separators, carriage return, etc)
  • When the output is PDF escape for PDF (etc, ...)

And you should as well protect yourself with different policies for different types of inputs. Cast integer as ints, filter white list of values, limit lenght of string.

  • Filter entries (remove harmful things for next step)
  • validate entries
  • output entries (in database or in HTML, etc)

On a big system it is hard to ensure this is always done, so try to build early your own objects which ensure the security steps are ALWAYS done. Do not let any functionnal part of the application use directly user entries ($_GET, $_POST, $_COOKIE, $_SERVER). and do not let them output on a final output directly (database,HTML, etc).

One real good read on that and on Hugarian Apps: making Wrong Code Look Wrong. Second time this week I link this page, but it's really an amazing read :-)

Then for big application I would recommend (edit: Sorry @Cray I did'nt saw you've just said it as well) using 2 database access, one read-only and one read-write. Use the read-write access only when needed (transactions, etc), you'll get a better application for scalability and a more secure one with just one idea :-).

Edit: Some other things:

  • Session gives you an identity, this is not sufficient, you need to add ACL, access control. you must perform an acl check on each request, set it in a low-level i.e try to perform this check before any application cache occurs. Try to set an url policy in your application that will help you with this ACL policy. and do not forget AJAX calls in it.
  • Url base security is still hard to maitain, should a user be allowed to forge custom GET requests and search data he were not really completly allowed to see? Sometimes using hidden or GET tokens verified server-side in the session data can prevent this manual seek.
  • You may need to think about row level security in the database (like the Virtual Private Database in Oracle). With modern databases like PostgreSQL you could emulate it with some triggers/rules and sessions variables.
share|improve this answer
    
when you said do not let any functional part of the application use direct user entries. when i use ajax i have post parameters send over data such as user name, field data etc to be used through $_POST , which are then cleaned then dealt with accordingly to what is needed. is that wrong/ –  george melinda Jan 22 '11 at 1:37
    
It as to do with making your code look right, you should be able to track usage of $_POST and see it is used only in your 2 or 3 filter functions, not elsewhere. Of course your code can be good and secure, but maybe not, you won't be able to re-read all lines of a bank application everytime, you need code convention to help you code in a secure way. Why would you code your ajax-mode functions with different tools, what is different in ajax mode? only the final output! –  regilero Jan 22 '11 at 8:57

using another file extension displayed to the user rather than php , aspx, etc.

blocking ping/requests for server/apache information and version.

Using an Apache AddHandler to run php under .html (or whatever other file extension) can be fun to confuse amateur scriptkiddies, but anyone who knows what they are doing shouldn't have a hard time figuring out what server model you're running through various other pokes and prods...

encrypting user passwords with sha1 or encryption with salt (never could figure these out)

Salting your password hashes is easy. You write a script that runs the password, plus a "key" that varies per user through an encryption method like sha1, and this hash is stored in the database. When a user logs in, the password they supply is ran through the same script and the hashes are compared. The purpose of the "key" is that even if 2 users have the same password, their hashes will still be different due to different keys. However rather then storing hash keys, I find its best to use a more complex script that blends in username and password with multiple encryptions like this:

$hash = sha1(substr(sha1($password), 0, strlen($_POST['password'])).substr(sha1($loginUsername), 0, (40-strlen($_POST['password']))));

which encrypts the password, encrpyts the username, uses the string length of the password to determine how to concatenate substrings of the 2 sha hashs, then encrpyts the whole string again. That might seem a bit excessive but there is no way in hell anyone is going to crack that even if they know the username and associated hash.

not storing credit card information locally

actually I believe by law you are not allowed to store credit card numbers, just the last 4 digits and a credit card number hash. I've never had to deal with credit card transactions but this is what we were taught in an e-commerce class I took a few semesters back.

as for input sanitation, when I need something beyond mysql_real_escape_string, I usually write my own regex validation script depending on what the expected input is...

share|improve this answer
    
that $hash that you create. do you create a table where you identify each user by that hash through the session they are given rather than putting the username in there. or do you encrypt both user name and password with that encryption in the db? –  george melinda Jan 22 '11 at 2:00
    
In my user table, I store the username as plain text (its used several other places in the site) and the 40 character hash. Encrypting the username is not necessary, even if the database is stolen, the complexity of the hash pretty much guarantees they wont be able to reverse engineer the password (even if they got the hash function, the hash contains only a partial string of the password's sha). When a user logs in, it runs the hash function against the supplied username and password, and verifies with the database both username and sha hash match. –  WebChemist Jan 24 '11 at 19:52

Go through every script and really use good input sanitation. If the data should be numeral, then make sure it only accepts numbers and so on. This is where most of the middlelevel bugs are found.

Dont have patterns in your htaccess for files you want to block. Instead block everything and only allow a specific set of files that you know are going to be used.

Make application (or even different parts of application) run with specially designed users of the database, with limited access. If a part of an application just displays information from a table, the db user it uses to connect to the database should only be able to see that particular table, and should only be able to read that database, not modify it. Report all the strange database permission errors to a special file and check regularly.

Be very careful around eval(), obvisouly never just run anything that comes from the outside of the script, better yet don't use eval() at all.

Carefully set permissions on the user that the server runs with. It should only be able to write to the diretories it needs to, and files in those directories should never be allowed to execute.

And most importantly, never start to think that your application is safe. Nothing is safe. New bugs and even types of bugs are coming out all the time, keep an eye out for them. You can for example subscribe to some security bulletin, and check with new bugs and exploits that come out, and then try to think if the same kind of exploit could be used on some part of your application.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for that submission. regarding db access permissions. should i set a different user login based on what is being used on the site? for example. one login for non-signed in users reading read-only material. and one who has access to his/her own members login to change their name, address, etc. and another for administration access ? –  george melinda Jan 22 '11 at 1:01
    
Exactly, and of course, the first user should only get the rights in the database to read certain tables. The second should be able to read certain tables and write to others (but also only to those that are needed by the design of your application). This of course makes it a little less flexible during the developing, but there has to be some kind of tradeoff, right? :P –  Cray Jan 22 '11 at 1:04
    
yes your right. whenever i've developed the two things i've always lacked and i guess was too lazy to do was never closing a connection when it was done being used and using only one db user with all rights. its a little too much work with this method but whatever makes it more secure and less headache later on :) –  george melinda Jan 22 '11 at 1:10

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