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I am developing an interface-driven serialization framework for use with interfaces for data XML serialization.

The ultimate goal is, that that framework is capable of save/load the state of the object (or a part of it, visible thought interface prism) using interfaces as an abstraction.

While thinking of the design, I have found, that using C# attributes, I can provide framework with required info to save and load state of the object, and the way, how to perform a serialization/deserialization. As an advantages, I discovered that no solution exits, capable of partial object save/restore. If i describe the XML data in terms of an interface with data attributes, i have found that it is not requred anymore to have a dependency to that interface form the class (so that class does not require anymore to implement the given interface for the XML data).

I have a question about the usage of XmlObjectSerializer class, due to some usability issues. Here the example of the interface declaration, being tested:

Here is a primer:

    interface IPersonRoot
    {
        string Name { get; set; }
    }

    [XmlRootSerializer("Body")]
    interface IPersonCustomRoot
    {
        string Name { get; set; }
    }

    interface IPersonAttribute
    {
        [XmlAttributeRuntimeSerializer]
        string Name { get; set; }
    }

    interface IPersonCustomAttribute
    {
        [XmlAttributeRuntimeSerializer("Id")]
        string Name { get; set; }
    }

    interface IPersonElement
    {
        [XmlElementRuntimeSerializer]
        string Name { get; set; }
    }

    interface IPersonCustomElement
    {
        [XmlElementRuntimeSerializer("Head")]
        string Name { get; set; }
    }

    interface IPersonCustomElementString
    {
        [XmlElementRuntimeSerializer("Head", typeof(string))]
        string Name { get; set; }
    }

    interface IVeryImportantPersonRoot : IPersonRoot
    {
        Guid Id { get; set; }
    }

    interface IVeryImportantPersonCustomRoot : IPersonCustomRoot
    {
        Guid Id { get; set; }
    }

    [XmlRootSerializer("Spirit")]
    interface IVeryImportantPersonCustomRootOverride : IPersonCustomRoot
    {
        Guid Id { get; set; }
    }

    interface IVeryImportantPersonAttribute : IPersonAttribute
    {
        Guid Id { get; set; }
    }

    interface IVeryImportantPersonCustomAttribute : IPersonCustomAttribute
    {
        Guid Id { get; set; }
    }

    interface IVeryImportantPersonElement : IPersonElement
    {
        Guid Id { get; set; }
    }

    interface IVeryImportantPersonCustomElement : IPersonCustomElement
    {
        Guid Id { get; set; }
    }

    interface IVeryImportantPersonCustomElementOverride : IPersonCustomElement
    {
        [XmlElementRuntimeSerializer("Guid")]
        Guid Id { get; set; }
    }

    interface IVeryImportantPersonCustomElementOverrideGuid : IPersonCustomElement
    {
        [XmlElementRuntimeSerializer("Guid", typeof(Guid))]
        Guid Id { get; set; }
    }

    interface IVeryImportantPersonCustomRuntimeSerializer : IPersonCustomElement
    {
        Guid Id { get; set; }

        [XmlColorRuntimeSerializer]
        Color Color { get; set; }  
    }

    interface IVeryImportantPersonColor
    {
        string Name { get; set; }

        Guid Id { get; set; }

        [XmlColorRuntimeSerializer]
        Color Color { get; set; }
    }

Here is the XmlObjectSerializer class definition:

public class XmlObjectSerializer
{
        //...
        public static void Load<T>(string xml, Type type, object value)
        {
            using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(xml)))
            {
                XDocument root = XDocument.Load(XmlReader.Create(ms));
                string rootName = GetRootName(typeof(T), root.Root.Name.ToString());
                IXmlObjectSerializer serializer = Load(root.Root, CreateInternal(null, rootName));
                serializer.Deserialize(type, value);
            }
        }
        public static void Load<T>(string xml, object value)
        {
            using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(xml)))
            {
                XDocument root = XDocument.Load(XmlReader.Create(ms));
                string rootName = GetRootName(typeof(T), root.Root.Name.ToString());
                IXmlObjectSerializer serializer = Load(root.Root, CreateInternal(null, rootName));
                serializer.Deserialize(typeof(T), value);
            }
        }
        public static string Save<T>(Type type, object value)
        {
            string rootName = GetRootName(typeof(T), value.GetType().Name);
            XmlObjectSerializer result = CreateInternal(null, rootName);
            IXmlRuntimeSerializer serializer = result;
            serializer.Serialize(type, value);
            XDocument root = new XDocument();
            return result.ToXmlString();
        }
        public static string Save<T>(object value)
        {
            string rootName = GetRootName(typeof(T), value.GetType().Name);
            XmlObjectSerializer result = CreateInternal(null, rootName);
            IXmlRuntimeSerializer serializer = result;
            serializer.Serialize(typeof(T), value);
            return result.ToXmlString();
        }
        public static void Load(Stream data, Type type, object value)
        {
            XDocument document = XDocument.Load(XmlReader.Create(data));
            string rootName = GetRootName(type, document.Root.Name.ToString());
            IXmlObjectSerializer serializer = Load(document.Root, CreateInternal(null, rootName));
            serializer.Deserialize(type, value);
        }
        public static void Save(Stream data, Type type, object value)
        {
            string rootName = GetRootName(type, value.GetType().Name);
            XmlObjectSerializer serializer = CreateInternal(null, rootName);
            serializer.Save(type, data, value);
        }
}

Then, here is a question:

Is is better to change XmlObjectSerializer class to be more generic, like XmlObjectSerializer, or just hide all public methods, which uses an Type as as argument? I have the compiler static analyzer warning, saying that using a generic methods, (i.e. Load(...), Save(...)) in a non-generic class is a bad practices and should be changed to the method, accepting Type as an argument.

The problem is, should i change the design of a XmlObjectSerializer class following that rule (in this case, i will loose generic approach) and use object and Type as an arguments, or keep the methods intact.

Can you give me an advice to follow on, and code samples related to posted code sample?

Phanx,

share|improve this question
1  
Not an answer, but if you're developing framework I would primarly focus on eliminating "copy&paste" antipattern which can be observed in Save/Load methods (good advice) – dzendras Jan 22 '11 at 12:33
    
That's a good idea, I can explain. Sometimes, when you are doing job for someone quick, you have a time and money pressure. I worked in company, which agreed to preserve it as my intellectual property, internally used this mechanism, but it was developed in so short time frame, that you wouldn't believe me. Basically, i have no free time to improve my projects for the open source community. So it is well known "cut & copy problem", particularly when you are trying to close as much work sets per day as you probably can. Sorry for such a code, I hope I will improve it with the community help. ;) – Artur Mustafin Jan 22 '11 at 13:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think that particular compiler warning in the general case is garbage; you should always look at the specific case.

Having written a few such frameworks, I would agree that it is important to include a Type based API, since there are many scenarios for such libraries where generics are a nuisance. By optimising for the non-generic case (rather than using MakeGenericMethod) you can do the other very simply:

Foo(Type type, ...) {...}
Foo<T>(...) { Foo(typeof(T), ...); }

This coming from someone currently re-writing a library to move the optimised case to Type rather than <T>. This is especially important for compact framework etc, where otherwise you can start getting missing-method exceptions when it runs out of space.

Re the interfaces; looks messy and complex - tl;dr; on that. But as long as you're happy...

share|improve this answer
    
Phanx, really good advice. +1 – Artur Mustafin Jan 22 '11 at 13:58
    
I am trying to involve declarative approach to XML data serialization, like .NET FW serialization, using attributes. May be i missed something, but i thought that if, for example, you have interface only DLL, which can be used to describe XML data serialization, for data standart1, which uses custom properties serialization in shared library. Then, say, 10 years later, programmer2 is need to support data standart2, which is an extension to standart1. He declares new interface for standart2, add some serialization attributes to properties, and derives it from existing interface. – Artur Mustafin Jan 22 '11 at 14:10
    
And, theoretically, that is all he will be required, he do not event need to access to source codes, to previously written load/unload code, because all interface-driven serialization mechanism already built into the framework – Artur Mustafin Jan 22 '11 at 14:11
    
Is that really a likely scenario? I'm not convinced... But again I can't comment fully on the interface stuff without really understanding it - so if you are content it solves the problems : great! – Marc Gravell Jan 22 '11 at 14:44

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