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Let's say I have a number of base 3, 1211. How could I check this number is divisible by 2 without converting it back to base 10?

Update
The original problem is from TopCoder
The digits 3 and 9 share an interesting property. If you take any multiple of 3 and sum its digits, you get another multiple of 3. For example, 118*3 = 354 and 3+5+4 = 12, which is a multiple of 3. Similarly, if you take any multiple of 9 and sum its digits, you get another multiple of 9. For example, 75*9 = 675 and 6+7+5 = 18, which is a multiple of 9. Call any digit for which this property holds interesting, except for 0 and 1, for which the property holds trivially. A digit that is interesting in one base is not necessarily interesting in another base. For example, 3 is interesting in base 10 but uninteresting in base 5. Given an int base, your task is to return all the interesting digits for that base in increasing order. To determine whether a particular digit is interesting or not, you need not consider all multiples of the digit. You can be certain that, if the property holds for all multiples of the digit with fewer than four digits, then it also holds for multiples with more digits. For example, in base 10, you would not need to consider any multiples greater than 999.
Notes
- When base is greater than 10, digits may have a numeric value greater than 9. Because integers are displayed in base 10 by default, do not be alarmed when such digits appear on your screen as more than one decimal digit. For example, one of the interesting digits in base 16 is 15.
Constraints
- base is between 3 and 30, inclusive.

This is my solution:

class InterestingDigits {
public:
    vector<int> digits( int base ) {
        vector<int> temp;
        for( int i = 2; i <= base; ++i )
            if( base % i == 1 )
                temp.push_back( i );
        return temp;
    }
};

The trick was well explained here : http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/17242/how-does-base-of-a-number-relate-to-modulos-of-its-each-individual-digit

Thanks,
Chan

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This is a cool question! Where did this come up? –  templatetypedef Jan 22 '11 at 9:01
    
And in what form do you have that number? string? –  Henk Holterman Jan 22 '11 at 9:51
    
@templatetypedef & Henk Holterman: Thanks! This idea came from a problem that I solved at TopCoder site. You guys can check it out here : math.stackexchange.com/questions/17242/… –  Chan Jan 22 '11 at 20:53
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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If your number k is in base three, then you can write it as

k = a0 3^n + a1 3^{n-1} + a2 3^{n-2} + ... + an 3^0

where a0, a1, ..., an are the digits in the base-three representation.

To see if the number is divisible by two, you're interested in whether the number, modulo 2, is equal to zero. Well, k mod 2 is given by

k mod 2 = (a0 3^n + a1 3^{n-1} + a2 3^{n-2} + ... + an 3^0) mod 2
        = (a0 3^n) mod 2 + (a1 3^{n-1}) mod 2 + ... + an (3^0) mod 2
        = (a0 mod 2) (3^n mod 2) + ... + (an mod 2) (3^0 mod 2)

The trick here is that 3^i = 1 (mod 2), so this expression is

k mod 2 = (a0 mod 2) + (a1 mod 2) + ... + (an mod 2)

In other words, if you sum up the digits of the ternary representation and get that this value is divisible by two, then the number itself must be divisible by two. To make this even cooler, since the only ternary digits are 0, 1, and 2, this is equivalent to asking whether the number of 1s in the ternary representation is even!

More generally, though, if you have a number in base m, then that number is divisible by m - 1 iff the sum of the digits is divisible by m. This is why you can check if a number in base 10 is divisible by 9 by summing the digits and seeing if that value is divisible by nine.

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Hi, unrelated to the OP, but in reference to your last paragraph, is this related to checking the divisibility by 3 (in base 10) by summing the digits, as well? If so, can you expand on that for the general case? –  Sdaz MacSkibbons Jan 22 '11 at 9:05
1  
@Simon- Sure! It's a similar trick. Writing the number in base ten writes it as sum a_i 10^i for all the digits. Since 10 mod 3 == 1, taking this value mod 3 gives you sum a_i (1^i) = sum a_i. So if you sum up the digits and it comes up with a multiple of three, the number itself must be a multiple of three. An even cooler case is if you consider multiples of 11. Since 10 == -1 (mod 11), your sum ends up coming out to sum a_i (-1)^i, which is the alternating sum of the digits. For example, 121 -> +1 -2 +1 = 0 is divisible by eleven. Try generalizing to 101 if you want! –  templatetypedef Jan 22 '11 at 9:07
    
Ah, thank you! Hate to bug you again with irrelevant questions, but your sum a_i 10^i, in LaTeX notation, would that be \sum_{a_i} 10^i, or \sum a_i 10^i ? :-) I'm trying to test it, but not sure where the sum should go. –  Sdaz MacSkibbons Jan 22 '11 at 9:18
1  
@Simon- Yeah, my notation is pseudo-LaTeX that certainly won't render right. I think it's \sum{a_i 10^i}, since it's the product of the digits (a_i) and the power of ten (10^i). –  templatetypedef Jan 22 '11 at 9:18
    
Gotcha. Thank you very much. Really need to take a number theory course... –  Sdaz MacSkibbons Jan 22 '11 at 9:20
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You can always build a finite automaton for any base and any divisor:

Normally to compute the value n of a string of digits in base b you iterate over the digits and do

n = (n * b) + d

for each digit d.

Now if you are interested in divisibility you do this modulo m instead:

n = ((n * b) + d) % m

Here n can take at most m different values. Take these as states of a finite automaton, and compute the transitions depending on the digit d according to that formula. The accepting state is the one where the remainder is 0.

For your specific case we have

n == 0, d == 0: n = ((0 * 3) + 0) % 2 = 0
n == 0, d == 1: n = ((0 * 3) + 1) % 2 = 1
n == 0, d == 2: n = ((0 * 3) + 2) % 2 = 0
n == 1, d == 0: n = ((1 * 3) + 0) % 2 = 1
n == 1, d == 1: n = ((1 * 3) + 1) % 2 = 0
n == 1, d == 2: n = ((1 * 3) + 2) % 2 = 1

which shows that you can just sum the digits 1 modulo 2 and ignore any digits 0 or 2.

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Add all the digits together (or even just count the ones) - if the answer is odd, the number is odd; if it's even, the nmber is even.

How does that work? Each digit from the number contributes 0, 1 or 2 times (1, 3, 9, 27, ...). A 0 or a 2 adds an even number, so no effect on the oddness/evenness (parity) of the number as a whole. A 1 adds one of the powers of 3, which is always odd, and so flips the parity). And we start from 0 (even). So by counting whether the number of flips is odd or even we can tell whether the number itself is.

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I'm not sure on what CPU you have a number in base-3, but the normal way to do this is to perform a modulus/remainder operation.

if (n % 2 == 0) {
    // divisible by 2, so even
} else {
    // odd
}

How to implement the modulus operator is going to depend on how you're storing your base-3 number. The simplest to code will probably be to implement normal pencil-and-paper long division, and get the remainder from that.

    0 2 2 0
    _______
2 ⟌ 1 2 1 1 
    0
    ---
    1 2
    1 1
    -----
      1 1
      1 1
      -----
        0 1 <--- remainder = 1 (so odd)

(This works regardless of base, there are "tricks" for base-3 as others have mentioned)

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1  
he doesn't have a base 3 computer, he's just doing a thought experiment! –  David Heffernan Jan 22 '11 at 9:07
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Same as in base 10, for your example: 1. Find the multiple of 2 that's <= 1211, that's 1210 (see below how to achieve it) 2. Substract 1210 from 1211, you get 1 3. 1 is < 10, thus 1211 isn't divisible by 2

how to achieve 1210: 1. starts with 2 2. 2 + 2 = 11 3. 11 + 2 = 20 4. 20 + 2 = 22 5. 22 + 2 = 101 6. 101 + 2 = 110 7. 110 + 2 = 112 8. 112 + 2 = 121 9. 121 + 2 = 200 10. 200 + 2 = 202 ... // repeat until you get the biggest number <= 1211 it's basically the same as base 10 it's just the round up happens on 3 instead of 10.

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