Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Which construction is faster:

$a = $b * $c ? $b * $c : 0;  

or

$i = $b * $c;  
$a = $i ? $i : 0;  

All variables are local ones.

Does speed differs for mulitplication, addition, substraction and division?

Update:

Here's some clarification:

  1. This is a theoretical question about writing speed-optimized code from scratch. Not about "searching bottlenecks".
  2. I can measure code speed by myself. But it's was not a question about homework of using microtime(). It was a question about how PHP-interpreter works (what I tried to figure out by digging google myself but was unseccusfull).
  3. Moreover - I did measuring with myself and was a little confused. Different starting values of $a, $b and $c (combinations of zeros, negative, positive, integer and floats) produce different results between constructions. So I was confused.

BoltClock provide me usefull info but user576875 made my day by posting a link to opcode decoder! His answer contains also direct answer to my question. Thanks!

share|improve this question
8  
Why don't you compare yourself? – zerkms Jan 22 '11 at 9:55
7  
Anyway, are you sure it is the slowest part of your code? – zerkms Jan 22 '11 at 9:56
1  
the first one, but its insignificant, unless you happen to need to do this several thousand times on one page load – Dagon Jan 22 '11 at 9:56
2  
@Dagon: thousand is not enough to get the difference in such case. I vote for 100k+. – zerkms Jan 22 '11 at 9:57
    
Does a couple of microseconds matter? – Salman A Jan 22 '11 at 9:57
up vote 10 down vote accepted

If you have PHP 5.3, this is faster:

$a = $b * $c ?: 0; 

This is the same as $a = $b * $c ? $b * $c : 0;, but the $a*$b calcultation is done only once. Also, it doesn't do additional assignments as in your second solution.

Using Martin v. Löwis's benchmark script I get the following times:

$a = $b * $c ?: 0;               1.07s
$a = $b * $c ? $b * $c : 0;      1.16s
$i = $b * $c; $a = $i ? $i : 0;  1.39s

Now these are micro-optimizations, so there is probably many ways of optimizing your code before doing this :)

If it is not the case, you may also want to compare generated PHP OP codes:

1 $a = $b * $c ? $b * $c : 0; :

number of ops:  8
compiled vars:  !0 = $a, !1 = $b, !2 = $c
line     #  op                           fetch          ext  return  operands
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   1     0  MUL                                              ~0      !1($b), !2($c)
         1  JMPZ                                                     ~0, ->5
         2  MUL                                              ~1      !1($b), !2($c)
         3  QM_ASSIGN                                        ~2      ~1
         4  JMP                                                      ->6
         5  QM_ASSIGN                                        ~2      0
         6  ASSIGN                                                   !0($a), ~2
         7  RETURN                                                   null

2 $i = $b * $c; $a = $i ? $i : 0;

number of ops:  8
compiled vars:  !0 = $i, !1 = $b, !2 = $c, !3 = $a
line     #  op                           fetch          ext  return  operands
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   1     0  MUL                                              ~0      !1($b), !2($c)
         1  ASSIGN                                                   !0($i), ~0
         2  JMPZ                                                     !0($i), ->5
         3  QM_ASSIGN                                        ~2      !0($i)
         4  JMP                                                      ->6
         5  QM_ASSIGN                                        ~2      0
         6  ASSIGN                                                   !3($a), ~2
         7  RETURN                                                   null

3 $a = $b * $c ?: 0; :

number of ops:  5
compiled vars:  !0 = $a, !1 = $b, !2 = $c
line     #  op                           fetch          ext  return  operands
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   1     0  MUL                                              ~0      !1($b), !2($c)
         1  ZEND_JMP_SET                                     ~1      ~0
         2  QM_ASSIGN                                        ~1      0
         3  ASSIGN                                                   !0($a), ~1
         4  RETURN                                                   null

These OP code listings was generated by the VLD extension.

share|improve this answer
    
YEY! It's EXACTLY what I need! I didn't even know that this things possible! Which tool or function I should use to produce such results? – supernova.ws Jan 22 '11 at 11:12
    
@user576875 How have you generated the OP code? – DrColossos Jan 22 '11 at 11:17
    
Very very nice going. +1 – BoltClock Jan 22 '11 at 11:21
    
added a link to the VLD extension used for generating these listings – arnaud576875 Jan 22 '11 at 11:24
    
@user576875: Thanks! Now I really can get answers for such types of questions by myself! – supernova.ws Jan 22 '11 at 11:30
<?php
function run(){
$b=10;
$c=10;
$start=gettimeofday(TRUE);
for($k=0;$k<10000000;$k++){
  $a = $b * $c ? $b * $c : 0;  
}
printf("%f\n", gettimeofday(TRUE)-$start);
$start=gettimeofday(TRUE);
for($k=0;$k<10000000;$k++){
  $i = $b * $c;  
  $a = $i ? $i : 0;  
}
printf("%f\n", gettimeofday(TRUE)-$start);
}
run();
?>

On my system (PHP 5.3.3, Linux, Core i7 2.8GHz), I get

1.593521
1.512892

So the separate assignment is slightly faster. For addition, (+ instead of *), I get the reverse result:

1.386522
1.450358

So you really need to measure these on your own system - with a different PHP version, the outcome may change again.

share|improve this answer
    
Interestingly if you set $b = 0;, you get the $a = $b * $c ? $b * $c : 0; runs a lot faster than the other one. So conclusion is, depends on the inputs :) – Lionel Chan Jan 22 '11 at 10:30
    
@Lionel Chan: Interesting indeed. Also notice that this optimization only happens for multiplication - addition of 0 is apparently not special-cased. – Martin v. Löwis Jan 22 '11 at 10:32
    
@Lionel: It probably optimizes it to 0 given one of the operands is 0. – BoltClock Jan 22 '11 at 10:43
    
(I think) the optimization occurs because for the first block, it needs to do multiplication, comparing and assigning, and for 2nd block, it needs to do multiplication, assigning, comparing, and assigning. Whichever pattern doesn't really helps much in optimization, imo. – Lionel Chan Jan 22 '11 at 10:50
    
Martin, you are right. One have to know a few things about measuring code. Your test, for example, measures nothing and, therefore, useless one. – Your Common Sense Jan 22 '11 at 11:55

Your two pieces of code have a drawback each. One does an additional assignment; the other does an additional mathematical operation. Best would be to do neither, which, with the ternary operator in PHP 5.3, you can:

$a = $b * $c ?: 0;

Omitting the second part of the ternary causes PHP to put the result of the first part there instead.

Using Martin v. Löwis's benchmarking code, I reckon this is about 25% faster than either.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, yeah, only if OP is using PHP 5.3. – BoltClock Jan 22 '11 at 10:48
    
@BoltClock Quite, which is why I mentioned it in my answer... – lonesomeday Jan 22 '11 at 10:50
    
Unfortunatly I need to maintain compatibility with PHP 5.2.x – supernova.ws Jan 22 '11 at 10:51
    
$a = 1 OR 0; is ($a = 1) OR 0;, and OR always evaluates to a boolean – arnaud576875 Jan 22 '11 at 12:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.