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I'm wondering if this is legal:

<?php

is_null
(
    $var
);

Or perhaps this:

<?php
$items = array
(
    "Details" => array('controller' => 'event', 'action' => 'readall', 'tab' => 'details'),
    "Calendar" => array('controller' => 'event', 'action' => 'readall', 'tab' => 'calendar')
);

Or will some interpreters choke?

I know the popular mixed style of classes and functions have the opening curly brace on a new line and control structures, such as "if", on the same line. However, I like all one or the other. Newline or no newline. It would be nice to extend the concept to function calls and their parenthesis as well. This is the reason for my question.

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Interesting question. Common sense dictates that it should work, but I don't have any formal evidence of that. –  Victor Nicollet Jan 22 '11 at 11:06
4  
What's not legal is the semicolon after $var in the first example ;) –  weltraumpirat Jan 22 '11 at 11:07
    
Have you run the code and tested the results? –  BoltClock Jan 22 '11 at 11:30
    
(related) Code Conventions –  Gordon Jan 22 '11 at 11:38
    
@weltraumpirat: LOL! Obviously I have not run the code... Fixed. –  d-_-b Jan 23 '11 at 3:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

That is very legal. And there aren't many interpreters after all. :) Use do put parentheses on the next line too if I got a large amount of parameters or a large array declaration.

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Whitespace doesn't matter. The only time I'm aware that the interpreter cares about whitespace is when exiting HEREDOC syntax. Other than that, you can have as many spaces or newlines as you want.

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1  
except within a token :P –  Federico Culloca Jan 22 '11 at 11:08

It's legal. the interpreter should just ignore any white space it finds.

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